Commentary on Hebrews by F.W. Farrar

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the HebrewsF.W. Farrar, latterly Dean of Canterbury Cathedral, is probably best known of his Life of Christ (1874). The title is somewhat misleading, being taken from title given to the letter by the KJV and Revised Version. In fact, Farrar argues at length that Apollos, rather than Paul, is the best known authorial candidate (see extract below).

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Hebrews. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1902. Hbk. pp.196. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

I. Introduction.

  1. Character, Analysis, and Object of the Epistle to the Hebrews
  2. Where was the Epistle written? and to whom?
  3. The Date
  4. Style and Character of the Epistle
  5. Theology of the Epistle
  6. The Author of the Epistle
  7. Canonicity

II. Text and Notes

III. Index

Introduction, pp.48-49.

Apollos meets every one of the necessary requirements. (1) He was a Jew. (2) He was a Hellenist. (3) He was an Alexandrian. (4) He was famed for his eloquence and his powerful method of applying Scripture. (5) He was a friend of Timotheus (6) He had ·acquired considerable authority in various Churches. (7) He had been taught b· an Apostle. (8) He was of the School of St Paul; yet (9) he adopted an independent line of his own (1 Cor. iii. 6). (10) We have no trace that he was ever at Jerusalem; and yet, we may add to the above considerations, that his style of argument-like that of the writer of this Epistle was specially effective as addressed to Jewish hearers. The writer’s boldness of tone (Acts xviii. 26) and his modest self-suppression (1 Cor. xvi. 12) also point to Apollos. The various allusions to Apollos are found in Acts xviii. 24-28; 1 Cor. iii. 4-6, xvi. 12; Tit. iii. 13; and in every single particular they agree with such remarkable cogency in indicating to us a Christian whose powers, whose training, whose character, and whose entire circumstances would have marked him out as a man likely to have written such a treatise as the one before us, that we may safely arrive at the conclusion either that AP0LLOS wrote the Epistle or that it is the work of some author who is to us entirely unknown.

Commentary on Matthew by Frank Marshall

Rev. Frank Marshall (left) portrayed in a satirical cartoon
 Rev. Frank Marshall (left) portrayed in a satirical cartoon. Source: Wikipedia

The Reverend Frank Marshall, the British schoolmaster, cleric and rugby administrator, wrote a whole series of commentaries for students preparing for their University entrance examinations (see here for a list). I am planning to make them all available as and when I gain access to printed copies.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing access to this public domain title.

Frank Marshall [1848-1906], The School and College St. Matthew. London: George Gill & Sons, Ltd., [1920]. Hbk. pp.165. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Preface

I. Introduction to the Gospel

  • Title
  • Origin of the Gospels
  • The Author
  • Life of St. Matthew
  • For What Readers
  • Date, Place, and Language
  • Characteristics of the Gospel
  • Peculiarities of St. Matthew’s Gospel
  • Miracles Recorded by St. Matthew
  • Parables Recorded by St. Matthew
  • Kings and Governors
  • Apostles
  • Biographical Notices
  • Geographical Notes
  • The Synagogue
  • The Sanhedrin
  • The Temple
  • Jewish Festivals
  • Sects and Orders of Men
  • The Nazarite Vow
  • The Kingdom of Heaven
  • Teaching of Our Lord
  • Use Of The Old Testament In St. Matthew
  • Demoniacal Possession
  • Titles of Our Lord
  • Testimony Borne to Our Lord
  • Ministry of Our Lord
  • Siege of Jerusalem

The Gospel According To St. Matthew, With Marginal And Foot Notes

Important Changes in the Revised Version, with Comments

Glossary of Words and Phrases Maps. Palestine in the Time of Our Lord

  • The Temple
  • Galilee
  • The Sea of Galilee
  • Jerusalem
  • Environs of Jerusalem
  • Sketch Map of Palestine (for reproduction)

 

 

Commentary on the Gospel of Luke by F.W. Farrar

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Gospel According to Luke with Maps, Notes and IntroductionThis is another of the Cambridge Bible for Schools series, a commentary on the Gospel of Luke by F.W. Farrar. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Gospel According to Luke with Maps, Notes and Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1888. Hbk. pp.392. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

I. Introduction

  1. The Gospels
  2. Life of St John
  3. Authenticity of the Gospel
  4. Characteristics of the Gospel
  5. Analysis of the Gospel; Chief Uncial MSS. of the Gospels; The Herods

II. Text and Notes

III. Excursus I-VII

IV. Index

Introduction, Chapter 1

The word Gospel is the Saxon translation of the Greek Euangelion. In early Greek (e.g. in Homer) this word meant the reward given to one who brought good tidings. In Attic Greek it also meant a sacrifice for good tidings but was always used in the plural euangelia. In later Greek, as in Plutarch and Lucian, euangeli’on meant the good news actually delivered. Among all Greek-speaking Christians the word was naturally adopted to describe the best and gladdest tidings ever delivered to the human race, the good news of the Kingdom of God. In the address of the Angel to the shepherds we find the words “I bring you good tidings of great joy,” where the verb used is euangelizomai. From this Greek word are derived the French Evangile, the Italian Evangelio, the Portuguese Evangelio, &c. Naturally the word which signified “good news” soon came to be used as the title of the books which contained the history of that good news….