Commentary on Ephesians by James S Candlish

John MacGregor Candlish [1821–1901], The Epistle of Paul to the Ephesians with Introduction and Notes

This is a short commentary on Paul’s letter to Ephesians by James S. Candlish, Professor of Theology at the Free Church College in Glasgow. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

John MacGregor Candlish [1821–1901], The Epistle of Paul to the Ephesians with Introduction and Notes. Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1901. Hbk. pp.132. [Click to visit the Ephesians page for the download link for this title and other resources]

Table of Contents

Introduction

  1. Authorship
  2. To Whom Addressed
  3. Time and Circumstances of Writing
  4. Scope and Contents of the Letter
  5. Relation of the Epistle to Other Parts of the New Testament

The Epistle with Notes

  • The Salutation. Ch. 1.1, 2
  • Prauise for God’s Salvation. Ch. 1.3-14
  • Prayer for Believers. Ch. 1.1—2-10
  • Reminder of their Changed Position. Ch. 2.11-12
  • Appeal as the Prisoner of Christ for the Gentiles. Ch. 3.1-21
  • Exhorttion to Loving Unity. Ch. 4.1-16.
  • Exhortation to Christian Living. Ch. 4.17—5.21
  • Exhortation to Mutual Subjection. Ch. 5.22—6.9
  • Call to Arms Against Spiritual Foes. Ch. 6.10-20
  • Conclusion. Ch. 6.21-24.

Commentary on the Gospel of Luke by Thomas M. Lindsay

Thomas M. Lindsay [1843-1914], The Gospel According to St. Luke, Chapters I-XII with Introduction, Notes, and Maps

Thomas M. Lindsay’s 2 volume commentary on Luke’s Gospel is part of the Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students series. I recently came across a partial set of these commentaries at Book Aid and will be putting them on-line over the next few weeks. These titles are in the public domain.

Thomas M. Lindsay [1843-1914], The Gospel According to St. Luke, Chapters I-XII with Introduction, Notes, and Maps. Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1887. Hbk. pp.171. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Thomas M. Lindsay [1843-1914], The Gospel According to St. Luke, Chapters XIII-End, with Introduction, Notes, and Maps. Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1887. Hbk. pp.95. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

  • The Gospel
  • The Gospel of Luke
  • The Writer of the Gospel
  • Its Relation to the other Gospels
  • Characteristics of Luke’s Gospel
  • When, where, and for whom written
  • Analysis of the Gospel
  • The Land of Palestine during our Lord’s Ministry
  • The Journeys of Jesus
  • The Jews of the Dispersion
  • Note I. Miracles and Parables recorded by Luke
  • Note II. Genealogical Table of the Herod Family

The Commentary

Commentary on Romans by David Brown

David Brown [1803-1897], The Epistle to the Romans with Introduction and Notes

David Brown’s commentary on Romans is part of the handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students series. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

David Brown [1803-1897], The Epistle to the Romans with Introduction and Notes. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1950. Hbk. pp.152. [Click to visit the Romans page for the download link for this title and other free resources]

Table of Contents

Introduction

  1. Authenticity of the Epistle
  2. The Traing of the Writer
  3. When and Where this Epistle was Written
  4. Origin of the Roman Church
  5. Was the Roman Church a Jewish or a Gentle Church
  6. The Plan and Character of this Epistle
  • Address and Salutation
  • Theme of the Epistle
  • Salvation needed alike by all, and first, by the whole gentile world
  • The Jew under condemnation no less than the gentile
  • Jewish objections answered
  • The doctrine of justification by faith illustrated from the Old Testament
  • The blessedness of the justified
  • Comparison and contrast between Adam and Christ in their relation to the human family
  • The fruits of justification in the new life
  • The completedness of them that are in Christ Jesus stretching over all time into eternity
  • The true Israel has not been rejected—How Israel after the flesh has has fallen—and how, in the case of both, and in the calling of the Gentiles, the word of God has taken effect
  • The ultimate infringing of all israel to form, with the Gentiles, one kingdom of God on the earth
  • Christian service
  • Political and Social Relations
  • Christian Forbearance
  • Conclusion