Greek Text Commentary on Jude and 2 Peter by J.B. Mayor

Joseph Bickersteth Mayor [1828-1916], The Epistle of St. Jude and the Second Epistle of St Peter. Greek Text with Introduction and Comments

Those with a good command of Greek will benefit most from this commentary, but even those with no Greek should find the massive introduction of interest. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

Joseph Bickersteth Mayor [1828-1916], The Epistle of St. Jude and the Second Epistle of St Peter. Greek Text with Introduction and Comments. London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd. / New York: The Macmillan Company, 1907. Hbk. pp.ccii +239. [Click to visit the 2 Peter page for the download link for this and other resources]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  1. Relation of the Second Epistle of Peter to the Epistle of Jude
  2. Grammar and Style of Jude and of 2 Peter
  3. Further Remarks on the Style of the Two Epistles
  4. Comparison Between 1 Peter and 2 Peter
  5. Comparison Between the Peter of the Two Epistles and the Peter of the Rest of the N.T.
  6. Authenticity of the Epistle of Jude and of the Second Epistle of Peter Considered
  7. Under What Circumstances were the Epistle of Jude and the Two Epistles of Peter Written?
  8. The Author of the Epistle of Jude
  9. Use of Apocryphal Books by Jude
  10. Story of the Fallen Angels
  11. False Teachers in the Church Towards the End of the First Century
  • Text of Jude and 2 Peter
  • Notes on the Second Epistle of St Peter
  • 2 Peter: Paraphrase and Comments
  • Index of Greek Words
  • Index of Subjects

Commentary on Ephesians by James S Candlish

John MacGregor Candlish [1821–1901], The Epistle of Paul to the Ephesians with Introduction and Notes

This is a short commentary on Paul’s letter to Ephesians by James S. Candlish, Professor of Theology at the Free Church College in Glasgow. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

John MacGregor Candlish [1821–1901], The Epistle of Paul to the Ephesians with Introduction and Notes. Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1901. Hbk. pp.132. [Click to visit the Ephesians page for the download link for this title and other resources]

Table of Contents

Introduction

  1. Authorship
  2. To Whom Addressed
  3. Time and Circumstances of Writing
  4. Scope and Contents of the Letter
  5. Relation of the Epistle to Other Parts of the New Testament

The Epistle with Notes

  • The Salutation. Ch. 1.1, 2
  • Prauise for God’s Salvation. Ch. 1.3-14
  • Prayer for Believers. Ch. 1.1—2-10
  • Reminder of their Changed Position. Ch. 2.11-12
  • Appeal as the Prisoner of Christ for the Gentiles. Ch. 3.1-21
  • Exhorttion to Loving Unity. Ch. 4.1-16.
  • Exhortation to Christian Living. Ch. 4.17—5.21
  • Exhortation to Mutual Subjection. Ch. 5.22—6.9
  • Call to Arms Against Spiritual Foes. Ch. 6.10-20
  • Conclusion. Ch. 6.21-24.

Keil and Delitzsch’s Commentary on Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther

Franz Delitzsch [1813-1890
Franz Delitzsch [1813-1890

Keil & Delitzsch’s Commentary on Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther has proved itself a valuable work over the years, even for those with no command of Hebrew. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Carl Friedrich Keil [1807-1888] & Franz Delitzsch [1813-1890], Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament. The Books of Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1878. Hbk. pp.380. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Ezra

§ 1. Name and Contents, Object and Plan
§ 2. Unity and Composition
§ 3. Composition and Historical Character

Commentary

Nehemiah

§ 1. Contents, Division, and Object
§ 2. Integrity and Date of Composition
Commentary

Esther

§ 1. Name, Contents, Object, and Unity
§ 2. Historical Character
§ 3. Authorship and Date
§ 4. Canonicity

Commentary

The Book of Ezra. Introduction

The book of Ezra consists of two parts. The first part, comprising a period anterior to Ezra, begins with the edict of Coresh (Cyrus), king of Persia, permitting the return to their native land of such Jews as were exiles in Babylon, and prescribing the rebuilding of the temple at Jerusalem (i. 1-4); and relates that when the heads of the nation, the priests and Levites, and many of the people, made preparations for returning, Cyrus had the sacred vessels which Nebuchadnezzar had carried away from Jerusalem brought forth and delivered to Sheshbazzar (Zerubbabel), prince of Judah (i. 5-11). Next follows a list of the names of those who returned from captivity (chap. ii.), and the account of the building of the altar of burnt-offerings, the restoration of divine worship, and the laying of the foundation of the temple ( chap. iii.)…

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