Commentary on the Book of Joshua by G.F. Maclear

George Frederick Maclear [1833-1902], The Book of Joshua.

This commentary on the Book of Joshua was written by the Rev. George Frederick Maclear [1833-1902], Warden of St Augustine’s, Canterbury and headmaster of King’s College School, London. This book is in the public domain and includes a couple of helpful maps.

George Frederick Maclear [1833-1902], The Book of Joshua. J.J.S. Perowne, gen.ed., The Cambridge Bible for Schools. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 18973. Hbk. pp.228. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  1. Introduction
    1. The Book of Joshua
    2. The Life of Joshua
    3. The Work of Joshua
    4. Joshua as a type of Christ
    5. Analysis of the book
  2. Text and Notes
  3. General Index
  4. Index of Words and Phrases explained

Introduction

1. The Pentateuch is followed in the Jewish Canon by a series which bears the name of Neviim Rishonim, “the earlier Prophets 1”, and comprises Joshua, Judges, the first and second Books of Samuel, and the two Books of Kings. This series contains the history of the Israelites,

(a) As governed by the successor of Moses and the elders who outlived him;

(b) As governed by native kings;

(c) As subject to foreign invaders.

2. The first of these Books, the Book of Joshua, derives its name, not from its Author, but from the great hero, whose exploits are therein related, and who succeeded to the command of the people after the death of the great Hebrew Lawgiver, and led the nation into the Promised Land.

3. The claims of the Book to a place in the Canon of the Old Testament have never been disputed, and its authority is confirmed by allusions to the events recorded in it, which are found in other Books of Holy Scripture. [Continue reading]

More resources on the book of Joshua can be found here

Commentary on the Book of Judges by Professor J.J. Lias

John James Lias [1834-1923], The Book of JudgesAccording to WikiSource John James Lias [1834-1923] was Chancellor of Llandaff Cathedral and Hulsean Lecturer in Divinity and Lady Margaret Preacher at the University of Cambridge. This is the full text of his commentary on the Book of Judges. This title is in the public domain.

John James Lias [1834-1923], The Book of Judges, J.J.S. Perowne, gen.ed., The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1884. Hbk. pp.220. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Introduction
    1. Contents, Authorship and Date, Genuineness, Canonicity, of the Book of Judges
    2. The Political, Moral, and Religious condition of Israel under the Judges
    3. The Personal character of the Judges
    4. The Song of Deborah
    5. The Chronology of the Period
    6. Analysis
  2. Texts and Notes
  3. Appendix
  4. Index

Introduction

I. Contents. The book of Judges consists of three parts. The first part (ch. i. 1, iii. 7) forms an Introduction, obviously designed to connect the book with the previous narrative in Joshua. We have first a description of the condition of the Israelites immediately after Joshua’s death, and their relations with the Phoenician peoples whom Joshua had left only half subdued (ch. i. i-ii. 10). Then (ch. ii. ii-iii. 7) the writer proceeds to give a brief summary of his history chiefly from a moral and religious point of view, pointing out the cause of national misfortunes, namely the disobedience of the people to the national law, and their apostasy from the national religion. The second part (ch. iii. 8-xvi. 31) contains the history of the Judges. In the third part (ch. xvii. to end) the historian adds two episodes of a more private and personal character… [Continue reading]

Problem of Deuteromomy by James Simon Griffiths

James Simon Griffiths [1869-1947], The Problem of Deuteronomy. Being the Bishop Jeune Memorial Fund Prize Essay (1909) on "The Historical Truth and Divine Authority of the Book of Deuteronomy"This is an expanded version of a prize-winning essay that summarises the arguments for and against the Mosaic authorship of Deuteronomy. This title entered the public domain on 1st January and still retails for around £10, so I trust that it will prove useful. This copy originally formed part of a Bible College library and came to me via book-aid.org.

James Simon Griffiths [1869-1947], The Problem of Deuteronomy. Being the Bishop Jeune Memorial Fund Prize Essay (1909) on “The Historical Truth and Divine Authority of the Book of Deuteronomy”. London: SPCK, 1911. Hbk. pp.128. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Analysis
    1. Clearing the Ground
    2. The Testimony of the Book
    3. Witness of Prophecy and History
    4. The Critical Theory
    5. The Critical Theory: Its Difficulties
    6. The Historical Truth of Deuteronomy
    7. The Divine Authority of Deuteronomy
  • Scripture Passages Referred to

Preface

This little book is a revised and enlarged edition of the Bishop Jeune Memorial Fund Prize Essay (1909) on “The Historical Truth and Divine Authority of the Book of Deuteronomy.” It is mainly an attempt to present as clearly and concisely as possible the chief arguments for and against the Mosaic origin of Deuteronomy, so that the English reader may be able to test them for himself, and arrive at a just conclusion on this important and much-debated question. When the author first thought of competing for the Jeune Prize it was his intention to make the “critical theory” as set forth in Dr. Driver’s Commentary, the Hastings Dictionary, etc., the starting-point of his own Essay. His change of plan is, he believes, fully vindicated in the following pages. He has earnestly endeavoured to be quite fair to those from whom he differs, to avoid any misrepresentation of their views, and to abstain from anything in the nature of special pleading. [Continue reading]