F.F. Bruce Copyright International: Guest Post by Larry Stone

Professor FF Bruce
Professor F.F. Bruce [12 October 1910 – 11 September 1990]
When Robert Hicks, a British book publisher, realized that many of the works of F.F. Bruce were not readily available, he wanted to correct that situation. He believed in the importance of Bruce’s excellent content and in Bruce’s example as a leading evangelical scholar. Of the nearly 60 books and hundreds of magazine articles written by the “Dean of Evangelical Scholarship,” Robert felt many of those that were not in print could be presented in a visually appealing way for the modern reader.

F.F. Bruce let the Bible speak freely and did not make it fit a particular system of theology. He was humble and gentle, and he respected those with whom he disagreed. He was a superb scholar, and his scholarship had the purpose of helping people encounter Jesus Christ. J.I. Packer said, “No Christian was ever more free of narrow bigotry, prejudice and eccentricity. . . . No man did more to demonstrate how evangelical faith and total academic integrity may walk hand in hand.”

Robert has a history of keeping the best of older Christian works in front of today’s Bible students. In the 1990s he brought Vine’s Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words (which F.F. Bruce had edited) back into copyright for the benefit of W.E. Vine’s daughters and he encouraged the promotion of the book.

After receiving the support of F.F. Bruce’s daughter, Sheila Lukabyo, Robert enlisted the help of Larry Stone, former editorial vice president of Thomas Nelson Publishers in the U.S. and co-founder of Rutledge Hill Press. They formed a new company, F.F. Bruce Copyright International, and they contacted nearly twenty of F.F. Bruce’s publishers. They will now make many of Bruce’s works available in 2017.

First, a few will be reformatted into printed booklets suitable for evangelism and Bible study in universities and in church groups. Second, about 20 of Professor Bruce’s books and collections of articles will be published as reasonably-priced ebooks, which can be easily distributed around the world to places such as Zambia, Australia, and India – places where it is expensive and time consuming to ship printed books.

Third will be a promotion of all of F.F. Bruce’s books – including those now in print and those already available as ebooks. Professor Bruce’s works can help young students and scholars understand the truths of the faith and the techniques of handling Scripture. As Tim Grass said in his biography of F.F. Bruce, “The issues which, for Bruce, were non-negotiable may be summarized as the reliability of the New Testament, the person and work of Christ, the Christian life as one of forgiveness and liberty as befits those who are being led by the Spirit, and the right and duty of every believer to use whatever gifts God has given them.”

Larry Stone
November 2016

An on-line bibliography of F.F. Bruce’s books and articles is available here.

Christians in Academia

Below is a series of videos produced by the Forum of Christian Leaders (FOCL) intended to equip Christians entering the world of Academia. They should prove of great interest to anyone considering or who has already begun an academic course in Theology.

Why should a Christian pursue an academic career? Daryl McCarthy. For more information, see here.

Embracing our Calling to the Academy. Daryl McCarthy. For more information, see here.

“Scholarship is a holy calling. Scholarship has played a critical role in the development and expansion of the world Christian movement over the centuries. So it is critical that as Christian educators we do our work with hearts aflame with worship, minds guided by Christ’s lordship, hands ready to serve, all in our effort to glorify God through our teaching and scholarship.”

Christians in Higher Education: Living Worthy of the Calling. Dirk Jongkind. For more information, see here.

“Every profession possesses its own particular dangers and offers its own specific opportunities for service. Those of us who are living and working in the Academy are faced with a specific set of challenges. In this talk, we take a step back and look at the ideals and dreams the Academy offers. What is the University at its best, what is it at its worst, and do we really have to sell our soul to succeed? And what about our role in the body of Christ and in the grand project of world missions?”

Serving Christ in Academia. Daniel Hill. For more information, see here.

“How should our Christian faith influence our academic endeavours? In particular, what should our motivation for doing academic work be, as Christians? How should we do our academic work? How should we choose among the various options available to us in administration, teaching, and research? And what does our faith have to say about the content of our administration, teaching, and research? In this talk, we try to apply the Bible’s teaching to answer these questions.”

Tyndale House Newsletter – October 2016

Tyndale House October Newsletter

This Tyndale House Newsletter is reproduced here by permission of the Tyndale House Communications Dept.

P. Beatty III (𝔓47): The Codex, Its Scribe, and Its Text

Peter Malik, one of our recently appointed Research Associates

Peter Malik, one of our recently appointed Research Associates, is working on a daily basis on the Codex Climaci Rescriptus. Amidst this work Peter is preparing to publish his Cambridge PhD dissertation successfully completed while at Tyndale House.

Malik investigated the earliest extensive handwritten copy of the Book of Revelation. In P. Beatty III (𝔓47): The Codex, Its Scribe, and Its Text, he applies codicology, palaeography and a knowledge of scribal practice to shed new light on the text.

Due out in 2017 and using the latest developments in digital photography this data-rich publication by Brill will offer, for the first time, high-resolution colour photographs of the manuscript.

‘Where Art Thou, O Hezekiah’s Tunnel?’

Another scholar to bring a fresh look on Biblical scholarship is Dr Mary Hom with her publication in the Journal of Biblical Literature this autumn.

Dr Mary Hom with her publication in the Journal of Biblical Literature this autumn

‘Where Art Thou, O Hezekiah’s Tunnel? A Biblical Scholar Considers the Archaeological and Biblical Evidence concerning the Waterworks in 2 Chronicles 32:3-4, 30 and 2 Kings 20:20’

Journal of Biblical Literature  Vol. 135, No. 3 (Fall 2016), pp. 493-503.

Mary writes: “The increase of Iron Age archaeological discoveries in the City of David in recent years has precipitated debates regarding the identification of the tunnel that Hezekiah built, as described in 2 Chronicles 32:30 (cf. 2 Kings 20:20). The possibility of Channel II instead of Tunnel VIII as the actual conduit that Hezekiah built in response to the approaching Assyrian threat has gained increasing attention among both archaeologists and biblical literary scholars, and new discoveries in the past fifteen years have both answered questions and raised new ones. This article is a rigorous interdisciplinary evaluation of the evidence from both fields, and it may be seen that when the issue of identifying Hezekiah’s tunnel is taken in consideration with an understanding of the biblical text in its ancient Near Eastern literary milieu along with the most reliably expert findings in archaeology, several recent questions may be resolved.”

Scholarship in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Revd Christophe Sadiki of the Anglican Church of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is a land of past troubles, but future potential. Thanks to our International Scholars Programme we were able to welcome the Revd Christophe Sadiki of the Anglican Church of the Congo to Tyndale House for three months over the summer.

Christophe’s dissertation topic is “The Corruption of the Monarchy in Israel with Reference to Deuteronomy 17: 14-20; 1 Samuel 8; 1 and 2 Kings; a Look at the DRC”. He explains: “I think that this topic is pertinent in our African context where corruption is a scourge that is contributing to poverty among our people. It will challenge scholars to think about and interpret the Word of God in a way that speaks to the DRC context. Upon graduation I am planning to join the faculty at the Anglican University of Congo where I will be engaged to train leaders for the Anglican Communion in the Province of the Anglican Church of Congo.”

Christophe has clearly found these months a huge stimulus to his doctoral research and it has opened a new world of enquiry to him. The community at Tyndale House have welcomed him warmly, assisted him in so many ways, practical and academic, and provided a supportive environment for his studies. A mentor allocated to him has been assiduous in his supervision, meeting him weekly and prompting Christophe to take new avenues of thought, and compare different traditions and methods of study.

Christophe himself seems to have made the most of every moment, refusing to allow the newness of the culture and climate to stand in his way. It has been difficult to get him to take time off and rest! On his final day in Cambridge he was extremely positive about every aspect of his time here. He was very pleased to have had the opportunity to meet readers and was very grateful to everybody who had helped and encouraged him during his stay.


Tyndale Fellowship conferenceOver 120 scholars attended the Tyndale Fellowship conference, held at High Leigh Conference Centre this summer. The theme was ‘Marriage, Family and Relationships’. Each study group held six sessions, with plenary lectures including:

  • The Old Testament Lecture: ‘The Patricentric Vision of Family Order in the Book of Deuteronomy’ (Dr Daniel I. Block)
  • The Philosophy of Religion Lecture: ‘Marriage and the State: Cut the connection’ (Dr Daniel Hill)
  • The Ethics and Social Theology Lecture: ‘Does English law need “marriage”?’ (Professor Julian Rivers)
  • Special lecture: ‘Scars Across Humanity’ (Dr Elaine Storkey)

 

marriagefamilyrelationships20161


These are examples of the many ways in which we here at Tyndale House are seeking to support and foster high level biblical scholarship in service of the church. Churches, seminaries and universities across the world need people who are intellectually and spiritually equipped to provide the most informed Christian teaching and education.

Will you help the next generation of biblical scholars by praying for us and supporting us financially? If you are outside the UK, your support is particularly powerful at this time when the Pound Sterling is so low.

With warmest regards,

Peter Williams