How to Study the English Bible by R.B. Girdlestone

Robert Baker Girdlestone [1836-1923], How to Study the English BibleThis little book was written to help new Christians understand how to read the Bible by Robert Baker Girdlestone [1836-1923], the first Principal of Wycliffe Hall in Oxford. As such it remains of enduring value. This title is in the public domain.

Robert Baker Girdlestone [1836-1923], How to Study the English Bible. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1887. Hbk. pp.112. [Click to visit the main download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  1. A Description of the English Bible
  2. The Bible the Word of God
  3. The Bible Demands Study
  4. Rules for Studying the Bible
  5. Hints on Special Books
  6. The Study of Doctrine
  7. The Practical and Devotional Use of the Bible
  8. Method and Order of Reading the Bible
  9. Useful and Order of Reading the Bible
  • Index of Subjects
  • Index of Texts

Preface

This little book is intended to supply a need felt by many students of God’s Word. They have taken in the message of salvation, they have dedicated their lives to the Master, and have said to Him, ‘Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?’ The answer to this question lies in the Scriptures, and they have begun to read their Bible in order to learn the will of God. But they soon feel that there are two ways of reading, – a right and a wrong way; and they look out for some practical guidance which may enable them to make the best of God’s Word.

The following pages are offered with a view of meeting this desire.

May God bless them to the reader’s use!

For more resources on how to read the Bible, please go here.

Abraham: His Life and Times by William J. Deane

Caravaggio's Sacrifice of Isaac - public domain - Source: Wikipedia
Caravaggio’s Sacrifice of Isaac – public domain – Source: Wikipedia

William J. Deane [1853-1943] provides a detailed study of the life of Abraham and assumes that the biblical account is reliable and accurate. This title is in the public domain.

William J. Deane [1853-1943], Abraham: His Life and Times. London: James Nisbet & Co., n.d. Hbk. pp.179. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
    1. Abram’s Birthplace
    2. First Call
    3. Second Call
    4. The Promised Land
    5. Egypt
    6. Separation
    7. Chedorlaomer
    8. The Covenant
    9. Hagar – Circumcision
    10. Sodom
    11. Gerar and Beersheba
    12. Temptation
    13. Machpaleh
    14. Isaac’s Marriage
    15. Closing years – Death

Preface

The materials for the facts of the life of Abraham are found in Holy Scripture, in the Book of Genesis, and in some of the later writings. I have taken it for granted that these statements are authentic, and have not thought it necessary to follow Ewald and his school in distinguishing the various authors of them, assigning this to” the Book of origins,” and that to the First narrator, and that to the Second, and so on. Nor have 1 esteemed the details thus given as accretions that have grown up round a great central figure in the lapse of centuries, the outcome of hero-worship, the result of a natural desire to accumulate on a great forefather anything that would tend to elevate his personal character ·or exalt the favour with which he was regarded by God…

Charles Ellicott’s Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905]
By Herbert R. Barraud (died 1896), Public Domain Source: Wikipedia.
In order to get the most from Bishop Charles Ellicott’s commentary on the Pastoral Epistles you will need a good grasp of Greek. Despite its age, this commentary still seems to be in demand, so I was very pleased to find one at Book Aid recently. This title is in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], The Pastoral Epistles of St. Paul: With a critical and Grammatical commentary and a revised translation, 3rd edn. London: Longmans, Green Reader & Dyer, 1869. Hbk. pp.263. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the Third Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on 1 Timothy
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on 2 Timothy
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on Titus
  • Translation: The First Epistle to Timothy
  • Translation: The Second Epistle to Timothy
  • Translation: The Epistle to Titus

Introduction

The date and general circumstances under which this and the accompanying Epistles were written have long been the subjects of discussion and controversy.

As our opinion on these points must first be stated, it may be said briefly,-(a) that when we duly consider that close connexion in thought, subject, expressions, and style, which exists between the First Epistle to Timothy and the other two Pastoral Epistles, it seems in the highest degree incredible that they could have been composed at intervals of time widely separated from each other. When we further consider (b) the almost insuperable difficulty in assigning any period for the composition of this group of Epistles in that portion of the Apostle’s life and labours included in the Acts; (c) the equally great or even greater difficulty in harmonizing the notes of time and place in these Epistles with those specified in the Apostle’s journeys as recorded by St Luke…