Call for Papers: Theological Education in the Majority World – A Pentecostal Perspective

Editors: Dave Johnson (D.Miss.) and Rick Wadholm Jr. (Ph.D.)

A joint project between the APTS Press and The World Alliance for Pentecostal Theological Education

Purpose and Philosophy

To reflect on current trends and needs in Pentecostal Theological Education in the Majority World. This could be used as a textbook for training theological educators.

Scope

The current plan calls for a two volume work, the first dealing with the graduate level and the second the undergraduate and Bible Institute level. Articles should be approximately 20 pages each in length. A call for proposals for the second volume will be issued at a later date.

Target Audience

English-speaking Majority World educational leaders, theologians and pastors.

Authorship

Multi-author—Priority to Majority World Pentecostal Scholars and others with long experience in theological education in the Majority World.

Publication Dates

Proposed 2020.

Publishing procedure

Digital—E-book and print-on-demand worldwide

Deadlines

Abstract deadline December 1, 2018; submission deadline: July 1, 2019. Articles are subject to peer review.

Potential authors should submit CVs plus an abstract of approximately 300 words for approval to either Dave Johnson ([email protected]) or Rick Wadholm Jr. ([email protected]).

Potential topics: (any topic related to the overall theme is welcome for consideration)

  • The role of a theological institution in relationship to churches and communities.
  • Integration of theological education and ministries of social concern.
  • Balancing academics and practical ministry foci.
  • Training non-western missionaries in our theological institutions.
  • Leadership development models.
  • Developing Pentecostal theological educators.
  • The role of the Holy Spirit in theological education.
  • Resourcing a Majority World seminary.
  • Integrating Majority World supernatural worldviews into Western-oriented theological curricula.
  • The role of the theologian in the Majority World today.
  • An evaluation of Western theological concepts and curricula in the Majority World and a call for change.
  • A brief overview of the growth and development of Pentecostal theological education in the Majority World (specific contexts).
  • Building, maintaining and resourcing a research culture at our theological institutions.

Open Source Commentary Survey – October Update

Open Access Commentary SurveyThere are currently six volunteers working on the Open Source Commentary Survey – a big “thank you” to those who have agreed to take part so far. See here to see which books still need to be surveyed. Tyndale House library have very kindly supplied me with a copy of their commentary catalogue in XML format. This will enable me to work out which commentaries are in the the Public Domain with a fair degree of accuracy. In return I will be supplying them with a copy of my list.

A number of people have suggested that I download commentaries already digitised on-line and use them. I did some work this week to see if this would be possible. Below is a screenshot of C.F. Burney’s commentary on Judges.

To me this well below the standard that I would want to use. The page colour is uneven and makes the text difficult to read. I experimented extracting the images, which removes the shadows and the colour-cast, but the resulting text is very pale and, again, difficult to read.

Fortunately I have access to commentaries through Book Aid locally and can order what they don’t have elsewhere, provided that the cost is reasonable. I will consider crowd-funding this if the cost becomes too great.

 

Commentary on Psalms 1-41 by A.F. Kirkpatrick

Alexander Francis Kirkpatrick [1849-1940], ed., The Book of Psalms with Introduction and Notes. Books I. Psalms I-XLIThis is the first part of the Rev A.F. Kirkpatrick’s Commentary on Psalms in the Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges series.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Alexander Francis Kirkpatrick [1849-1940.], ed., The Book of Psalms with Introduction and Notes. Books I. Psalms I-XLI. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1892. Hbk. pp.227. pdf [This material is in the Public Domain]

Table of Contents

Preface by the General Editor J.J.S. Perowne, D.D.

I. Introduction:

  1. The Book of Psalms
  2. The Position, Names, Numbering, and Divisions of the Psalter
  3. The Titles of the Psalms
  4. The Authorship and Age of the Psalms
  5. The Collection and Growth of the Psalter
  6. The Form of Hebrew Poetry
  7. The Hebrew Text, the Ancient Versions, and the English Versions
  8. The Messianic Hope
  9. On some points in the Theology of the Psalms

II. Text and Notes

III. Appendices

Index

Chapter 1

Lyric poetry is the most ancient kind of poetry, and Hebrew poetry is mainly lyric. Neither epic nor dramatic poetry flourished in ancient Israel. Some indeed of the historical Psalms may be said to have an epic colouring, but they belong to the class of didactic narrative: Job and the Song of Songs may be called in a sense dramatic, but they do not appear to have been intended for performance on the stage. The only independent branch of poetry in Israel was Gnomic or Proverbial poetry, which in the hands of the ‘Wise Men’ attained to a rich development, and must have exercised an important influence on the education of the people.

The Old Testament is the religious history of Israel, and the poetry preserved in the Book of Psalms is, as might be expected, religious poetry. Secular poetry no doubt existed, but it has not come down to us….