Ad-Blocking and the Future of Free Stuff on the Web

Opening a web page recently I was alerted to a new feature in the Firefox browser: its automatic ad and cookie blocker. While ad-blockers are nothing new, the fact that this feature is active by default is. I suspect that it also extends to Amazon and Google Analytics cookies.  In my opinion, as ad revenue falls, this will speed up the demise of the ever dwindling number of sites offering material for free online. While you can turn off the Firefox ad-blocker by following the instructions here, I think the writing is on the wall.

No Paywalls!

I am committed to keeping access to Theology on the Web completely free, with no paywalls or privileged content. For this reason I am encouraging everyone who uses the sites regularly – and can afford to do so – to consider supporting them regularly using a PayPal subscription or by a Bank Standing Order (though it is worth noting that PayPal no longer appears to offer this service to personal account holders).

Regular support will mean that I can increase the amount of material I make freely available each month. You can support the sites for as little as £1 ($2) a month. Alternatively, if you would like to make a one-off donation you can do it via PayPal in the normal way or through the tip jar (which you will find on each page). If your Bible College or Seminary makes use of the sites, they might also consider supporting them. I hope shortly to announce a new partnership which will illustrate one way in which that might be done.

If you are able to support Theology on the Web in this way (or in ways that won’t cost you anything) please visit this page. I want to say a big thank you to everyone who supports the sites, whether that is on a regular basis or by one-off donation. Every contribution is gratefully received!

Commentary on the Gospel of Luke by F.W. Farrar

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Gospel According to Luke with Maps, Notes and IntroductionThis is another of the Cambridge Bible for Schools series, a commentary on the Gospel of Luke by F.W. Farrar. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Gospel According to Luke with Maps, Notes and Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1888. Hbk. pp.392. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

I. Introduction

  1. The Gospels
  2. Life of St John
  3. Authenticity of the Gospel
  4. Characteristics of the Gospel
  5. Analysis of the Gospel; Chief Uncial MSS. of the Gospels; The Herods

II. Text and Notes

III. Excursus I-VII

IV. Index

Introduction, Chapter 1

The word Gospel is the Saxon translation of the Greek Euangelion. In early Greek (e.g. in Homer) this word meant the reward given to one who brought good tidings. In Attic Greek it also meant a sacrifice for good tidings but was always used in the plural euangelia. In later Greek, as in Plutarch and Lucian, euangeli’on meant the good news actually delivered. Among all Greek-speaking Christians the word was naturally adopted to describe the best and gladdest tidings ever delivered to the human race, the good news of the Kingdom of God. In the address of the Angel to the shepherds we find the words “I bring you good tidings of great joy,” where the verb used is euangelizomai. From this Greek word are derived the French Evangile, the Italian Evangelio, the Portuguese Evangelio, &c. Naturally the word which signified “good news” soon came to be used as the title of the books which contained the history of that good news….

B.W. Newton & Dr. S.P. Tregelles, Teachers of Faith and the Future

Samuel Prideaux Tregelles (30 January 1813 – 24 April 1875)Samuel Prideaux Tregelles (1813 – 1875) is best known today for his critical Greek text of the New Testament. This book provides a summary of his life and work and that of his colleague, B.W. Newton.

F.F. Bruce writes in the Foreword:

I am glad for several reasons to commend the memoir which Mr. Fromow has prepared of B. W. Newton and S. P. Tregelles. One reason is that, as Mr. Fromow has mentioned, some of the material has appeared in The Evangelical Quarterly during my editorship of that periodical.

Another reason is that the name of S. P. Tregelles is one that must always be held in grateful honour by Biblical students for the great work which he did last century on the text of the New Testament. His Greek New Testament is his legacy and monument, and there is no need to enlarge here upon its character and worth. But it is unlikely that Tregelles would ever have begun this work but for the influence which B. W. Newton exercised upon him in his early days; and when at a later date Tregelles was prevented by paralysis from continuing and completing his work, it was Newton who undertook the responsibility of seeing the concluding part through the press. Newton thus merits a share in the gratitude which the world of Biblical learning owes to Tregelles….

My thanks to The Sovereign Grace Advent Testimony for their kind permission to place this book on-line. This title may be downloaded and used for free educational purposes, but not sold for profit without written permission from the copyright holder.

George H. Fromow, ed., B.W. Newton and Dr. S.P. Tregelles. Teachers of the Faith and the Future. The Life and Works of B.W. Newton & Dr. S.P. Tregelles. Taunton: The Phoenix Press, n.d. Hbk. pp.174. [Click here to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. B. W. Newton’s Call by Grace
  2. Newton’s Life and Career
  3. How He Learned Prophetic Truth
  4. Testimonies to His Character and Work
  5. Samuel Prideaux Tregelles, LL.D., Life and Letters
  6. Evangelists in Welsh
  7. Tregelles Greek New Testament
  8. Christians Influenced by their Writings
  9. A Page from Church History
  10. A Statement of Doctrinal Belief
  11. Propositions for Christian Consideration
  12. Extracts from the Teachings of Tregelles
  13. Dr. Tregelles as a Hymn Writer
  14. The Eternal Sonship and the Suretyship of Christ
  15. Principles for the Reading of Scripture
  16. Matthew’s Gospel is Characteristically Christian
  17. Thoughts on Romans Chapters 1 : 2 and 3
  18. The Church in the Epistle to the Ephesians
  19. Imputed Righteousness
  20. Christ, the Church and the Nations
  21. The Renewal of the Near East
  22. Newton’s Forecasts Up-To-Date
  23. Revelation Chapter 13 and the Pope
  24. Some Revised Translations
  25. The Goal of Godless Governments
  26. Daniel’s Visions Illustrated

Appendices

  • Mr. Newton’s Prayers
  • A Statement and Acknowledgment
  • A Humble Letter
  • Books
  • The Sovereign Grace Advent Testimony Manifesto
  • Indices