Commentary on the Epistles of John by Alfred Plummer

Alfred Plummer, master of University College Durham, was a prolific writer of biblical commentaries. He wrote the volumes on Luke, 1 Corinthians and 2 Corinthians in the International Critical Commentary (ICC) old series, as well as four of the The Cambridge Bible for Schools series.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of his commentary on John’s letters for digitisation. This volume is in the public domain.

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], The Epistles of John. The Cambridge Bible for Schools. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1892. Hbk. pp.220. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
  3. Appendices
  4. Indices

The Last Years of S. John

A sketch of the life of S. John as a whole has been given in the Introduction to the Fourth Gospel. Here it will not be necessary to do more than retouch and somewhat enlarge what was there said respecting the closing years of his life, in which period, according to all probability, whether derived from direct or indirect evidence, our three Epistles were written. In order to understand the motive and ton,e of the Epistles, it is requisite to have some clear idea of the circumstances, local, moral, and intellectual, in the midst of which they were written.

(i) The Local Surroundings-Ephesus

Unless the whole history of the century which followed upon the destruction of Jerusalem is to be abandoned as chimerical and untrustworthy, we must continue to believe the almost universally accepted statement that S. John spent the last portion of his life in Asia Minor, and chiefly at Ephesus. The sceptical spirit which insists upon the truism that well-attested facts have nevertheless not been demonstrated with all the certainty of a proposition in Euclid, and contends that it is therefore right to doubt them, and lawful to dispute them, renders history impossible. The evidence of S. John’s residence at Ephesus is too , strong to be shaken by conjectures. It will be worth while to state the main elements of it.

Commentary on Revelation by William Henry Simcox

The Reverend William Henry Simcox was the Rector of Harlaxton in Lincolnshire. This is his contribution to the Cambridge Bible for Schools series on the Book of Revelation.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

William Henry Simcox [1843-1889], The Revelation of S. John the Divine with Notes and Introduction, 2nd edn. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1910. Hbk. pp.176. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
  3. Appendices

Introduction: Authorship and Canonicity

In the case of some of the books of Scripture, the questions of their authorship and of their canonical authority are quite independent of one another. Many books are anonymous, many have their authors known only by a post-canonical tradition; and the rejection, in any case where it may be called for, of this tradition need not and ought not to involve a denial of the divine authority of the book. Even in cases where the supposed author is named or unmistakeably indicated in the book itself, it does not always follow that the book must either be written by him, or can owe none of its inspiration to the Spirit of truth: the person of the professed author may be assumed dramatically without any mala fides. On the other hand, there are books which plainly exclude any such hypothesis, and must either be forgeries, more or less excusable but hardly consistent with divine direction, or else must be accepted as genuine and inspired works of their professed authors.

Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles in 2 Volumes – Thomas M. Lindsay

Thomas M. Lindsay [1802-1866], The Acts of the Apostles with Introduction, Notes and Maps, Volume 1This is Thomas Martin Lindsay’s 2 Volume commentary on Acts. Lindsay is best known for his writings on the Reformation (see here and here for some examples).

My thanks to Book Aid for making these public domain works available for digtisation.

Thomas M. Lindsay [1802-1866], The Acts of the Apostles with Introduction, Notes and Maps, Volume 1. Chapters I-XII. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, [1884]. Hbk. pp.143. [Click here to visit the download page]

Thomas M. Lindsay [1802-1866], The Acts of the Apostles with Introduction, Notes and Maps, Volume 2. Chapters XIII-XXVIII. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, [1884]. Hbk. pp.165. [Click here to visit the download page]

Introduction

In the more important MSS. of the New Testament, the title ls not ” The Acts of the Apostles,” but “Acts of Apostles,” and in one very important MS., the Sinaitic, the book is called simply “Acts.” These titles describe the book much better; it does not contain all the acts, nor even the principal acts of all the Apostles, but only a few selected deeds of some of the Apostles. It is a record of Apostolic Acts, not of the Acts of the Twelve Apostles. In this respect, the book may be fitly compared to the Gospels. They are not, nor do they pretend to be, a complete record of that Life of untiring activity which found “no leisure so much as to eat” (Mark vi. 31). They were written that the readers “might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God….