Evangelical Quarterly Volume 86 (2014) on-line

Evangelical Quarterly Volume 86 (2014) front cover

BiblicalStudies.org.uk provides the on-line archive for The Evangelical Quarterly, subject to the permission of the authors, who usually hold the rights to these articles. There is a five year delay between publication and the articles appearing in the archive. Most of the material from Volume 86 (2014) is now available for free download. It contains a good variety of subject matter: from the trinity to hermeneutics; early church history to eschatology, and so should provide something of interest to most readers.

My thanks to the authors who have granted permission for their articles to be hosted here. More may appear later, so be sure to visit the main Evangelical Quarterly archive for updates and the download links.

Table of Contents

86.1

John Wilks, “Editorial,”: 3-5.

Fred Sanders, “Redefining Progress in Trinitarian Theology: Stephen R. Holmes on the Trinity,”: 6-20.

Jason Radcliff, “T.F. Torrance in the light of Stephen Holmes’s Critique of Contemporary Trinitarian Thought,”: 21-38.

Jon Mackenzie, “A Double-Headed Luther? A Lutheran Response to The Holy Trinity by Stephen R. Holmes,”: 39-54.

Kevin Giles, “A personal response to Stephen R. Holmes,”: 55-62.

John E. Colwell, “A Conversation Overheard: Reflecting on the Trinitarian Grammar of Intimacy and Substance,”: 63-76.

86.2

Bernardo Cho, “Subverting Slavery: Philemon, Onesimus, and Paul’s Gospel of Reconciliation,”: 99-115.

Gregory R. Goswell, “The book of Ruth and the house of David,”: 116-129.

Peter Ensor, “Tertullian and penal substitutionary atonement,”: 130-142.

Andrew Gregory, “Patristic study debunked – or redivivus? A review article,”: 143-155.

86.3

Michael Strickland, “Redaction Criticism on Trial: The Cases of A.B. Bruce and Robert Gundry,” Andrew Gregory, “Patristic study debunked – or redivivus? A review article,”: 195-209.

Benjamin L. Merkle & W. Tyler Krug, “Hermeneutical Challenges for a Premillennial Interpretation of Revelation 20,”: 210-226.

Laurie Guy, “Back to the Future: The Millennium and the Exodus in Revelation 20,”: 227-238.

Nicholas P. Lunn, “‘Let my people go!’ The exodus as Israel’s metaphorical divorce from Egypt,”: 239-251.

86.4

Timothy C. Tennent, “Postmodernity, the Paradigm and the Pre-Eminence of Christ,”: 291-302.

Stanley E. Porter, “The Authority of the Bible as a Hermeneutical Issue,”: 303-324.

Benjamin Sargent, “Biblical hermeneutics and the Zurich Reformation,” Timothy C. Tennent, “Postmodernity, the Paradigm and the Pre-Eminence of Christ,”: 325-342.

Mark Saucy, “Personal Ethics of the New Covenant: How Does the Spirit Change Us?” Evangelical Quarterly 86.4 (Oct. 2014): 343-378.

Westminster Commentaries: Pastoral Epistles by Ernest Brown

Ernest Faulkner Brown [1854-1933], The Pastoral Epistles with Introduction and Notes. Westminister Commentaries

This is an exegetical commentary on the Pastoral Epistles of 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus from the Westminster Commentaries series. Ernest Faulkner Brown [1859-1933] was a leader of the Oxford Mission to Calcutta and a Canon of St. Paul’s Cathedral in that city.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Ernest Faulkner Brown [1854-1933], The Pastoral Epistles with Introduction and Notes. Westminister Commentaries. London: Methuen & Co. Ltd., 1917. Hbk. pp.121. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
    1. Timothy and Lystra
    2. Timothy as companion of S. Paul
    3. Titus as companion of S. Paul
    4. Authorship of the Letters
    5. Titus and Crete
    6. The Second Epistle of Timothy
  • Text and Commentary
    • The First Epistle of Timothy
    • The Second Epistle of Timothy
    • The Epistle of Titus
  • Index

Intrroduction

I. Timothy and Lystra.

‘The very brilliant colony of Lystra’ as it delighted to call itself1 was a place of some importance in the middle of the first century. Though merely a small rustic town in the Lycaonian territory of southern Asia Minor, it had been raised some fifty years before to the dignity of a Roman ‘ colony’ by the Emperor Augustus, i.e. it had received a garrison of Roman veterans, with the view of holding in check the wild tribes of the !saurian mountains in its neighbourhood. These Romans would be few in number and would keep very much to themselves ; though they were found in several of the towns which S. Paul visited, Philippi is the only one where they have left any trace on the narrative ; and there they did so owing to peculiar circumstances. The commerce and civic life of such a town would be carried on mainly by the educated Jews and Greeks; by the latter term is meant not only Greeks by race, but also those indigenous inhabitants who had imbued themselves with Greek culture and manners~. The most numerous class of the population would be the Lycaonians, rough and uncultured, from the country round. In these conditions we have an almost exact parallel to many of the country towns in India, more especially those in the hill districts. A small body of Europeans holding themselves aloof may answer to the Roman colonists. The educated Musulmans and Hindus represent the Jews and Greeks by whom the business of the city is carried on. The crowd of aboriginal inhabitants, mostly poor and uneducated, form the main part of the population’. Between the last three classes no very sharp line of demarcation exists. The aboriginals may at any time pse to the level of the educated. The Mahomedans and Hindus mix together freely in the ordinary affairs of life. They draw the line however at intermarriage, whereas between the Jews and Greeks of such a city as Lystra marriage might occasionally take place, as in the case of Timothy’s parents, though owing to the difference of religion and the abhorrence of the stricter Jews for idolatry it could not have been common.

Sir William Ramsay has proved, to the satisfaction of nearly all critics, that Lystra in common with Derbe, Antioch and Iconium belonged to the Roman 1 province of Galatia, and ‘Galatians’ was the name by which their inhabitants would prefer to be called….

Pages xi-xii.

C.J. Cadoux, The Historic Mission of Jesus

C.J. Cadoux, The Historic Mission of Jesus 1

Cecil John Cadoux was Vice-Principal of Mansfield College Oxford and MacKennal Professor of Church History. He is remembered for his numerous books on pacifism. His brother was Arthur Temple Cadoux, the author of The Sources of the Second Gospel, which as the book I was looking for when I came across this one. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain work available for digitisation.

Cecil John Cadoux [1883-1947], The Historic Mission of Jesus. A Constructive Re-Examination of the Eschatological Teaching in the Synoptic Gospels. London & Redhill: Lutterworth Press, 1941. Hbk. pp.376. [Click here to visit the download page for this public domain title]

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Part 1: The Bringer of the Kingdom of God
    1. The Son of God
    2. The Loving and Intimate Servant of God
    3. The Friend of Sufferers and Sinners
    4. The Messiah of Israel
    5. The Conqueror of Satan
    6. The Rightful Lord of Men
    7. The Son of David
    8. The Son of Man
  • Part 2: The Nature and Presence of the Kingdom of God
    1. The Meaning of “The Kingdom of God”
    2. The New Way of Life
    3. The Kingdom Already Present
    4. The Kingdom for the Jews
    5. The Kingdom for the Gentiles
    6. The Political Significance of the Kingdom
    7. The Priceless Value of the Kingdom
  • Part 3: The Future of the Kingdom as First Envisaged
    1. Jesus’ Initial Expectations of Success
    2. The Future Coming of the Kingdom
    3. Rewards and Punishments in General
    4. Rewards and Punishments in the Life After Death
    5. Rewards and Punishments in the Coming Age
  • Part 4: The Future of the Kingdom as Last Envisaged
    1. The Cross Foreseen, Accepted, and Explained
    2. The Roman Invasion and Conquest
    3. The Return of the Son of Man
    4. The Disciples in the Interval
    5. The Consummation
  • Conclusion
  • Indices

Synopsis

In this book the author has aimed at presenting in systematic form the whole of the Synoptic evidence bearing on our Lord’s conception of the Kingdom of God and of his own mission in relation to it. For this purpose he has utilized Dr. Streeter’s important theories regarding the Gospel-documents.

Not only is the entire evidence presented, but its significance is fully discussed; and an attempt is made to show the interconnectedness of its several parts. Furthermore, the author advances one or two theories which–while not in the strict sense new–have never yet been generally accepted or fully utilized for the purpose of bringing out the real meaning and inward consistency of Jesus’ mission. Thus he emphasises (1) the nation-wide character of his appeal, (2) his concern for the redemption of the Gentiles through Israel’s fulfilment of the universalistic aspirations of the Old Testament, (3) his eager endeavour to avert a military clash between the Jews and the Roman Empire, and (4) his early expectation of being accepted and loyally followed by his fellow-countrymen as a whole.

His eschatological views are recognised as playing a real part in his general world-view; but reasons are given for rejecting the thorough-going interpretation urged by Schweitzer. On the other hand, the author finds himself unable to accept on its entirety the recently-broached theory of “released eschatology.” He pleads that the general coherence of the findings to which his study of the evidence leads him constitutes a very strong confirmation of their soundness.

The Synoptic material in handled frankly on its own merits as historical evidence, the author being convinced that untrammelled historical investigation and construction is an absolutely indispensible prerequisite for any really satifying doctrinal speculations.

From the back cover of the dustjacket.

Should you wish to purchase a hard copy of the new edition of this title, one is available from my friends at James Clarke Lutterworth Press.