Commentary on Paul’s Letters to the Thessalonians by G.G. Findlay

The Rev George G. Findlay was Professor of Biblical Languages at the training college for Methodist ministers at Headingly, Leeds. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain book available for digitiation.

George Gillanders Findlay [1849-1919], The Epistles to the Thessalonians with Introduction and Map. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1894. Hbk. pp.183. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Preface

I. Introduction:

Chapter I. The City of Thessalonica

Chapter II. How the Gospel Came to Thessalonica

Chapter III. The Gospel of Paul at Thessalonica

Chapter IV. The Occasion of the Two Epistles

Chapter V. The Style and Character of the Two Epistles

Chapter VI. Analysis and Digest of the Epistles

II. Text and Notes

III. Appendix. On the Man of Lawlessness

IV. Index

Introduction. The City of the Thessalonians

Most of the ancient cities in which St Paul laboured have in the course of ages either perished or sunk into insignificance. Rome still remains, “the eternal city,” holding a unique place amongst the world’s great capitals. And along with Rome, though in a far inferior position, Thessalonica has retained its identity and its importance throughout the immense changes of the last two thousand years.

The town first appears in Greek history under the name of Therma,–so called from the warm mineral springs in its vicinity. Its later designation was given to it by Cassander, who on seizing the vacant throne of Alexander the Great in Macedonia married his sister Thessalonica. Her name was, no doubt, a memorial of some victory gained by her father Philip of Macedon over his neighbours in Thessaly.

Founding a new city upon this site in 315 B.C., the usurper called it after his high born wife. Cassander’s foundation rapidly grew into a place of commercial and political consequence…

Commentary Survey for Public Domain Commentaries

New Testament Commentary Survey by D.A. CarsonDon Carson’s excellent New Testament Commentary Survey fulfils a very specific and valuable purpose: it evaluates modern commentaries and allows readers who have access to books to choose the best ones for them.

For Bible teachers in the Majority World, such surveys may be of less value. The commentaries recommended, even if they were available in their country, would cost far more than the average person could afford. Older commentaries, that are now in the public domain, are poorly covered (though understandably so, given the book’s purpose), often being dismissed with phrases like “The key insights have been incorporated into more recent works…”.

Given that the primary purpose of Theology on the Web is to provide good biblically-based resources for the Majority World and those without access to physical books, I want to find a way around this problem – with your help.

How You Can Help

I want to upload (on BiblicalStudies.org.uk) a survey of public domain biblical commentaries. This survey would identify the strengths and weaknesses of each. It would then rank them as suitable for (a) the general reader; (b) for ministers, or (c) for scholars.  Once the survey is completed I would ensure that the best commentaries are all available via BiblicalStudies.org.uk.

I am therefore seeking a number of contributors who would agree to evaluate commentaries on a biblical book, or group of books e.g. the Pastoral Epistles or the Minor Prophets.

Please let me know if you are interested in contributing to this Project by e-mailing me at [email protected] Please feel free to make comments and suggestions below. If you are not sure which commentaries might be in the Public Domain, I can help you to narrow down your list.


This Project was initially proposed on the Theology on the Web Facebook Group. I am grateful for the Group’s feedback, which has enabled me to refine its parameters.