Cambridge Greek Testament on Revelation by William Henry Simcox

William Henry Simcox [1843-1889], The Revelation of S. John the Divine with Notes and Introduction. Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

William Henry Simcox’s Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools on Revelation is the last of the series I have been able to find in the library of Spurgeon’s College. As you will see from the full list here, I am still working on 3 volumes, all kindly provided by the Library at Sarum College, Salisbury.

William Henry Simcox [1843-1889], The Revelation of S. John the Divine with Notes and Introduction. Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1893 Hbk. pp.248. [Click here to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface by the General Editor
  • Editor’s Preface
  • Analysis of the Introduction
  1. Introduction
    1. Authorship and Canonicity of the Revelation
    2. Date and Place of Composition
    3. Principles of Intepretation
    4. Analysis of the Book
    5. Greek Text
  2. Text
  3. Notes
  4. Appendix
    1. The Angels of the Churches: Elemental Angels: the Living Creatures
    2. On the Heresies controverted in the Revelation
    3. On the supposed Jewish origin of the Revelation of St. John
    4. On the Millennium and the First Resurrection
  5. Indices
    1. Greek
    2. General

Swete’s Commentary on the Apocalypse of John

Henry Barclay Swete [1835-1917], The Apocalypse of St. John. The Greek Text with Introduction and Notes, 3rd edn.

H.B. Swete’s Commentary on the Apocalypse of John receives the following comment from Don Carson in his New Testament Commentary Survey:

Swete is normally stodgy and often dull, but although he never shakes of his pedestrianism, in this commentary there is some really useful and thorough material that helps the reader to see the depth of the book

Page 162.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain work available for digitisation.

Henry Barclay Swete [1835-1917], The Apocalypse of St. John. The Greek Text with Introduction and Notes, 3rd edn. London: Macmillan & Co. Ltd., 1922. Hbk. pp.338. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to Third Edition
  • Preface to Second Edition
  • Preface to First Edition
  • Introduction
    1. Prophecy in the Apostolic Church
    2. Apocalypses, Jewish and Christian
    3. Contents and plan of the Apocalypse of John
    4. Unity of the Apocalypse
    5. Destination
    6. Christianity in the Province of Asia
    7. Antichrist in the Province of Asia
    8. Purpose of the Apocalypse
    9. Date
    10. Circulation and reception
    11. Vocabulary, Grammar, and Style
    12. Symbolism
    13. Use of the Old Testament and of other Literature
    14. Doctrine
    15. Authorship
    16. Text
    17. Commentaries
    18. History and methods of Interpretation
  • Text and Notes
  • Index of Greek Words used in the Apocalypse
  • Index to the Introductoon and Notes

Commentary on Revelation by Alfred Plummer

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], Revelation. The Pulpit Commentary

This is a commentary on the book of Revelation in The Pulpit Commentary series by Alfred Plummer. It presented difficulties in scanning because of the very poor quality of the paper used. My previous scanner was unequal to the challenge, but my new one has at least provided a readable result, even if it is not up the quality I would like. Plummer also wrote a commentary on the letters of John in the same series, which I will look out for.

My thank to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain work for digitisation.

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], Revelation. The Pulpit Commentary. London & New York: Funk & Wagnalls Co., 1909. Hbk. pp.585. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
    1. The Title
    2. Author
    3. Date
    4. Place
    5. Manuscripts
    6. Versions
    7. Quotations
    8. History of the Printed Text
    9. Character of the Greek
    10. Authenticity
  • Commentary
  • Index

Introduction. 1. The Title

The Revelation. – The name given to this book in our Bibles is the English form of the Latin equivalent of the Greek title Apokaluphis. This Greek title is as old as the book itself, and forms the first word of the original text, where it constitutes an essential member of the opening sentence and paragraph. It was consistent with the Hebrew cast of the whole document that the Hebrew fashion of naming books by their initial words should be followed in this instance; but the classical and modern method of designating a. literary work by the name ‘of its principal theme happened here ‘to lead to the same resnlt: Apokaluphis is not only the initial word of the book, but also a subject-title, descriptive of the largest portion of the contents.

In the Vulgate version the Greek word is retained, both in the title and at the commencement of the text. Its proper Latin equivalent, however, is not found by merely writing it in Latin letters, apocalypsis, but by combining the Latin renderings of its two component parts, taking re to represent apo and velatio as synonymous with kaluphis. According to the etymological genius of the respective languages, just as the simple substantive velatio, or kaluphis, signified the act of covering with a veil, so the compound re-velatio, or apo-kaluphis, meant the act of removing, turning back, or taking off the veil, in such a manner as to discover what previously was hidden from view.

The Latin compound, unaltered except by the Anglicizing of its termination, has become thoroughly naturalized in our English language; and on that account it is, for biblical and ministerial use, preferable to the original title, which, even in its Anglicized form, “Apocalypse,” has never ceased to be “Greek” to ordinary English ears….

Pages i-ii