C.J. Cadoux, The Historic Mission of Jesus

C.J. Cadoux, The Historic Mission of Jesus 1

Cecil John Cadoux was Vice-Principal of Mansfield College Oxford and MacKennal Professor of Church History. He is remembered for his numerous books on pacifism. His brother was Arthur Temple Cadoux, the author of The Sources of the Second Gospel, which as the book I was looking for when I came across this one. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain work available for digitisation.

Cecil John Cadoux [1883-1947], The Historic Mission of Jesus. A Constructive Re-Examination of the Eschatological Teaching in the Synoptic Gospels. London & Redhill: Lutterworth Press, 1941. Hbk. pp.376. [Click here to visit the download page for this public domain title]

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Part 1: The Bringer of the Kingdom of God
    1. The Son of God
    2. The Loving and Intimate Servant of God
    3. The Friend of Sufferers and Sinners
    4. The Messiah of Israel
    5. The Conqueror of Satan
    6. The Rightful Lord of Men
    7. The Son of David
    8. The Son of Man
  • Part 2: The Nature and Presence of the Kingdom of God
    1. The Meaning of “The Kingdom of God”
    2. The New Way of Life
    3. The Kingdom Already Present
    4. The Kingdom for the Jews
    5. The Kingdom for the Gentiles
    6. The Political Significance of the Kingdom
    7. The Priceless Value of the Kingdom
  • Part 3: The Future of the Kingdom as First Envisaged
    1. Jesus’ Initial Expectations of Success
    2. The Future Coming of the Kingdom
    3. Rewards and Punishments in General
    4. Rewards and Punishments in the Life After Death
    5. Rewards and Punishments in the Coming Age
  • Part 4: The Future of the Kingdom as Last Envisaged
    1. The Cross Foreseen, Accepted, and Explained
    2. The Roman Invasion and Conquest
    3. The Return of the Son of Man
    4. The Disciples in the Interval
    5. The Consummation
  • Conclusion
  • Indices

Synopsis

In this book the author has aimed at presenting in systematic form the whole of the Synoptic evidence bearing on our Lord’s conception of the Kingdom of God and of his own mission in relation to it. For this purpose he has utilized Dr. Streeter’s important theories regarding the Gospel-documents.

Not only is the entire evidence presented, but its significance is fully discussed; and an attempt is made to show the interconnectedness of its several parts. Furthermore, the author advances one or two theories which–while not in the strict sense new–have never yet been generally accepted or fully utilized for the purpose of bringing out the real meaning and inward consistency of Jesus’ mission. Thus he emphasises (1) the nation-wide character of his appeal, (2) his concern for the redemption of the Gentiles through Israel’s fulfilment of the universalistic aspirations of the Old Testament, (3) his eager endeavour to avert a military clash between the Jews and the Roman Empire, and (4) his early expectation of being accepted and loyally followed by his fellow-countrymen as a whole.

His eschatological views are recognised as playing a real part in his general world-view; but reasons are given for rejecting the thorough-going interpretation urged by Schweitzer. On the other hand, the author finds himself unable to accept on its entirety the recently-broached theory of “released eschatology.” He pleads that the general coherence of the findings to which his study of the evidence leads him constitutes a very strong confirmation of their soundness.

The Synoptic material in handled frankly on its own merits as historical evidence, the author being convinced that untrammelled historical investigation and construction is an absolutely indispensible prerequisite for any really satifying doctrinal speculations.

From the back cover of the dustjacket.

Should you wish to purchase a hard copy of the new edition of this title, one is available from my friends at James Clarke Lutterworth Press.

Practical Commentary on Mark by James Morison

Practical Commentary on Mark by James Morison 2

James Morison offers a detailed commentary on the Gospel of Mark which does not require knowledge of Greek.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Greek. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

James Morison [1816-1893], A Practical Commentary on the Gospel According to St. Mark, 7th edn. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1892. Hbk. pp.481. [Click to visit the download page for this book]

Table of Contents

  • Prefatory note
  • Introduction
    1. Gospel and Gospels
    2. Title of St, Mark’s Gospel
    3. The Name ‘Mark’
    4. St Mark the Evangelist the ‘John Mark’ of the Acts of the Apostles
    5. Covert Reference to the Evangelist in the Body of the Gospel
    6. The Relation of the Apostle Peter to the Gospels: Patristic Evidence
    7. Relation of the Gospel to the Apostle Peter: Internal Evidence
    8. The Inner Relation of the Gospel to the Synoptic Gospels of St. Matthew and St. Luke
    9. Date of the Gospel
    10. The Place of the Gospel’s Publication and the Language in Which it was Originally Given Written
    11. The Plan, Aim, and Style of the Gospel
    12. Integrity of the Gospel
    13. The Topical Position of St. Mark’s Gospel in the Group of Gospels
    14. The Contents of the Gospel
  • Exposition of the Gospel
  • Index to the Exposition

Prefatory Note

The following Commentary on the Gospel according to St. Mark, though latently complementive of the author’s Commentary on the Gospel according to St. Matthew, is yet entirely ‘self contained.’ There are, indeed, occasional references to some fuller discussions or expositions in the Commentary on St. Matthew; but the thread of continuous exposition in St. Mark is never suspended or broken off. The author conceives that he was not entitled to postulate the reader’s possession of the earlier volume; and be imagines that it would have been a blunder in the structure of his present work, had it imposed, even on those readers who possess the companion volume, the irksome task of turning to it, and turning it up, ere they could ascertain his opinion on any particular passage in St. Mark.

In thus endeavouring to avoid a ‘rock ‘ on which many had struck, the author was not unmindful that there was a little malstrom-like ‘Charybdis’ on the other side of ‘Scylla,’ no less dangerous to navigators. Hence he has been on his guard not to allow any of the materials which have done duty in the Commentary on St. Matthew to float silently away into the whirlpool of circulatory repetition, in order to do double service in expounding the coincident representations in St. Mark. He hopes that whatever else his readers may miss in the present volume, they will find throughout fresh veins of representation and illustration, the result of fresh labour and research.

In St. Mark’s Gospel, moreover, there 1s a pervading peculiarity of phraseology, (inartificial indeed, yet idiosyncratic,) which to the lover of delicate tints and flickers of presentation affords a continual incentive to fresh investigation. Hence, in truth, much of the charm, as also much of the difficulty, in expounding St. Mark. The charm is intensified if the conviction can be substantiated, (as it undoubtedly can, provided the sum of the existing evidence be impartially weighed,) that St. Peter’s teaching within the circle of the early catechumens was the chief fountainhead from which St. Mark drew the substance and even the minutiae of his Gospel. The flicker of St. Peter’s subjective conceptions is thus passing before us as we read. It is a fact fitted to stimulate. We feel as if we should not like to let slip any of that subtle essence, or quintessence, of mind which made the primary observations of the chief of the Lord’s personal attendants distinctive as well as distinct, and his subsequent reminiscences and representations invariably vivid and frequently picturesque.

Whether attributable to St. Peter’s tenacity of memory, or to that unique element in his dialect which made his manner of speech, like that of every other original mind, peculiarly his own, or whether merely attributable to the reproductive idiosyncrasy of the writer, ‘vexed expressions’ abound in St. Mark, and give ample scope for patient, yet exciting, research.

Pages ix-x

Commentary on Mark’s Gospel by Allan Menzies

Allan Menzies [1845-1916], The Earliest Gospel. A Historical Study of the Gospel According to Mark

Allan Menzies was Professor of Biblical Criticism at the University of St Andrews. His commentary of the Gospel of Mark (which contains both a Greek and English text) argues for a date of composition around 70 AD. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Allan Menzies [1845-1916], The Earliest Gospel. A Historical Study of the Gospel According to Mark. London: Macmillan & Co. Ltd., 1901. Hbk. pp.306. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Table of Sections and of the Parallel Passages in the Gospel according to Matthew and Luke

I. Introduction

  • The Synoptic Problem. The Gospel not originally written
  • Motives of the formation of the Gospel tradition. The Gospel to be understood from the Apostolic Age
  • Why the Gospels appear so late
  • Absense from the earliest Christian writings of the details of the gospel ministry
  • Early Christian theology did not require the Gospels
  • The tradition was important practically
  • Aetiological motive in the Gospel tradition
  • Apologetic motive
  • Devotional motive
  • Yet the Gospels are also historical
  • State of the tradition before Mark wrote. Its fragmentary nature
  • Early collections of Gospel materials
  • Nature of Mark’s Gospel as gathered from itself
  • Absence of discourses
  • Sources of this Gospel
  • Mark’s order
  • Progress of Mark’s narrative
  • He treats his materials with freedom
  • Descriptive touches. Was the Gospel written to be read at meetings?
  • The Gospel is addressed to Western readers
  • Aramaisms and Latin words
  • Traces of Paulinism
  • Date of the Gospel
  • Personal history of Mark
  • Mark and Paul
  • Mark and Peter
  • Church traditions of Mark
  • Account of Papias
  • Conclusion

II. Text, Versions and Commentary

III. Index of Subjects

IV. Index of Passages Referred to

Preface

The Gospel according to Mark is now regarded by nearly all scholars as the earliest and also the most original of those which we possess; and if this is the case the study of the Life of Christ must begin with it. As Professor Pfleiderer points out in his Urchristenthum, this Gospel alone admits of examination apart from any other; and the first step in the attempt to see Christ as history reveals him, must be to apprehend as clearly as we can the individual testimony of Mark’s Gospel.

Several recent works on the second Gospel appreciate its importance on this ground. What is now presented to the reader does not enter into competition with the commentaries of Professor Swete or of Professor Gould, but may perhaps to some extent supplement them. On textual and philological questions Dr. Swete’s book must always be consulted, and that of Dr. Gould is full of suggestion on the side of thought. Another English book which should be named is the commentary on the Synoptic Gospels in The Expositor’s Greek Testament, by the late lamented Dr. A. B. Bruce.

The present work seeks to determine the historical outcome of the earliest Gospel taken by itself. On the one hand it strives to approach to the original facts handed down by the tradition; on the other to understand those special interests of the age in which the Gospel was written which necessarily determined in some degree both its contents and its form. The writer has learned most from two German works which are perhaps too solid ever to be translated, Das Marcus-evangelium by Dr. B. Weiss, 1872, and the treatment of the Synoptic Gospels by Dr. H. J. Holtzmann in the Hand-Commentarzum Neuen Testament, first edition, 1889. But he has exercised throughout an independent judgment.

For the sake of the student who may use this work the Greek text which is adopted is given, and the principal variants are pointed out. The English version will show him how the text is understood. The commentary can be read continuously, and the reader who does not know Greek will yet, it is hoped, find the book serviceable. It is written with a profound conviction that as criticism declares the second Gospel to be the porch by which we must go in to find the Saviour as he was and is, the earnest reader of that Gospel may indeed find him there. For his teaching, it is true, we have to look elsewhere; and his figure as here disclosed is homelier and more subject to human limitations than that to which we are accustomed. But though more human it need not be less divine.

Pages v-vi.