Commentary on James and Jude by Alfred Plummer

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], The General Epistles of St. James and St. Jude

This is the third edition of Alfred Plummer’s commentary on the letters of James and Jude. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], The General Epistles of St. James and St. Jude. The Expositor’s Bible. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1899. Hbk. pp.476. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  1. The Catholic Epistles
  2. The Authenticity of the Epistle of St. James
  3. The Author of the Epistle: James the Brother of the Lord
  4. The Persons Addressed in the Epistle: The Jews of the Diaspora
  5. The Relation of the Epistle to the Writings of St. Paul amd of St. Peter.—The Date of the Epistle—The Doctrine of Joy in Temptation
  6. The Relation of this Epistle to the Books of Ecclesiastes and of the Wisdom of Solomon.—The Value of the Apocrypha, and the Mischief of Neglecting it
  7. The exaltation of the Lowly, and the fading away of the rich.—The metaphors of Str. James and the parables of Christ
  8. The source of temptations, and the reality of sin.—The difficulties of the determinist
  9. The delusion of hearing without doing.—The mirror of God’s word
  10. The Christology of St. James.—The practical unbelief involvged in showing a wordly respect of persons in public worship
  11. The iniquity of respecting the rich and despising the poor.—The solidarity of the divine law
  12. Faith and works: Three views of the relation of the teaching of St. James to the teaching of St. Paul.—The relation of Luther to both
  13. The faith of demons; the faith of Abraham; and the faith of Rehab the Harlot
  14. The heavy responsibilities of teachers.—The powers and propensities of the tongue.—The self-defilement of the reckless talker
  15. The moral contradictions in the reckless talker
  16. The wisdom that is from below
  17. The wisdom that is from above
  18. St. James and Plato on lusts as the cause of strife; Their effect on prayer
  19. The seductions of the world, and the jealousy of the divine love
  20. The power of Satan and its limits.—Humility the foundation of penitence and of holiness
  21. Self-assurance and invasion of divine prerogatives involved in hte love of censuring others
  22. Self-assurance and invasion of divine prerogatives involved in presuming upon our future.—The doctrine of prababilism
  23. The follies and inequalities of the rich; Their miserable end
  24. Patience in waiting.—The Endurance of Job.—The significance of the mention of Job by James
  25. The prohibition of swearing.—The relation of the language of St. James to recorded sayings of Christ
  26. Worship the best outlet and remedy for excitement.—The connexion between worship and conduct
  27. The elders of the church.—The anointing of the sick and extreme unction
  28. The public and private confesson of sins.—The lawfulness of prayers for rain
  29. The work of converting sinners; its conditions and rewards

    The General Epistle of Jude
  30. The authenticity of the epistle of St. Jude
  31. The purpose of the epistle.—The faith once for all delivered and the development of Christian doctrine
  32. The persons denounced in the epistle.—Its relation to 2 Peter
  33. Doubtful readings and the theory of verbal inspiration.—Three palmary instances of divine vengeance upon grevious sin
  34. Railing at dignities.—”The Assumption of Moses.”—St. Jude’s use of apocryphal literature
  35. The description corresponding to Cain. The libertines at the Love-feasts.—The Book of Enoch
  36. The description to Balaam: the impious discontent and greed of the libertines.—The Apostolic warning respecting them
  37. The description corresponding to Korah; Making separations.—Exhortations to the faithful to build up themselves, and then rescue others
  38. The final doxology: praise to God, the protection of his servants
  • Index

International Critical Commentary on Romans

William Sanday [1843-1920] & Arthur Cayley Headlam [1862-1947], A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans

William Sanday and Arthur Headlam’s Commentary on Romans is often recommended as being one of the best in the International Critical Commentary old series. Even if you have the replacement by C.E.B. Cranfield, this one is still worth referring to. This title entered the public domain in 2018.

William Sanday [1843-1920] & Arthur Cayley Headlam [1862-1947], A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans. The International Critical Commentary, 5th Edn. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1908. Hbk. pp.450.

Click here to visit the Romans page for the link to this commentary and other free material.

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
    § 1. Romans in A.D. 58
    § 2. The Jews in Rome
    § 3. The Roman Church
    § 4. Time and Place, Occasion and Purpose
    § 5. Argument
    § 6. Language and Style
    § 7. Text
    § 8. Literary History
    § 9. Integrity
    § 10. Commentaries
  • Commentary
  • Detached Notes
    The Theological Terminology of Rom. i. 1-7
    The word dikaios and its cognates
    The Meaning of Faith in the New Testament and in some Jewish Writings
    The Righteousness of God
    St. Paul’s Description of the Condition of the Heathen World.
    Use of the Book of Wisdom in Chapter i 5
    The Death of Christ considered as a Sacrifice
    The History of Abraham as treated by St. Paul and by St. James
    Jewish Teaching on Circumcision
    The Place of the Resurrection of Christ in the teaching of St. Paul
    Is the Society or the Individual the proper object of Justification?
    The Idea of Reconciliation or Atonement
    The Effects of Adam’s Fall in Jewish Theology
    St. Paul’s Conception of Sin and of the Fall
    History of the Interpretation of the Pauline doctrine of dikaiosis
    The Doctrine of Mystical Union with Christ
    The Inward Conflict
    St. Paul’s View of the Law
    The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit
    The Renovation of Nature
    The Privileges of Israel
    The Punctuation of Rom. ix. 5
    The Divine Election
    The Divine Sovereignty in the Old Testament
    The Power and Rights of God as Creator
    The Relation of St. Paul’s Argument in chap. ix to the Book of Wisdom
    A History of the Interpretation of Rom. ix. 6-29
    The Argument of ix. 30-x. 21: Human Responsibility
    St. Paul’s Use of the Old Testament
    The Doctrine of the Remnant
    The Merits of the Fathers
    The Argument of Romans ix-xi
    St. Paul’s Philosophy of History
    The Salvation of the Individual: Free-Will and Predestination
    Spiritual Gifts
    The Church and the Civil Power
    The History of the word agape
    The Christian Teaching on Love
    The early Christian belief in the nearness of the parousia
    The relation of Chapters xii-xiv to the Gospels
    What sect or party is referred to in Rom. xiv?
    Aquila and Priscilla
  • Index
    • Subjects
    • Latin Words
    • Greek Words

Commentary on Epistles of Timothy and Titus by A.E. Humphreys

Alfred Edward Humphreys [1844-?], The Epistles of Timothy and Titus

This is a short commentary on the letters of 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus intended for use in Schools and Colleges. The author argues strongly for Pauline authorship in what appears to be a very useful introduction.

My thanks to Book Aid for making available a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Alfred Edward Humphreys [1844-?], The Epistles of Timothy and Titus. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1897. Hbk. pp.271. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
    1. The Genuineness and Date of the Epistles
    2. The Friends Addressed in the Epistles
    3. The Theme and Content of the Epistles
  3. Appendix
  4. Indices
    Map

External Evidence

There was never any doubt in the Church, from the first century down to the present, but that St Paul was the author of these epistles. The rejection by Marcion, as has been well pointed out, increases the force of this testimony, as it shews that attention was expressly called to the subject. And Marcion’s, Canon of Scripture was fixed not by the evidence of authenticity, but by his own approval of the contents, of any book.

The attack made in the present century upon the genuineness of the epistles relies upon arguments drawn from their internal characteristics. In estimating the weight to be attached to these arguments it is of importance to be first sufficiently impressed by the strength of the external evidence. Instead therefore of dismissing this side of the question in a sentence, it is well to place in view the different groups of testimonies down to the acknowledged position given to the epistles by the Church in Canon and Council.

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Greek Text Commentary on 1 & 2 Thessalsonians by George Milligan

Greek Text Commentary on 1 & 2 Thessalsonians by George Milligan 1

If you have a good grasp of New Testament Greek, George Milligan’s commentary on Paul’s letters to the Thessalonians will be of interest to you.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

George Milligan [1860-1934], St Pauls Epistles to the Thessalonians. The Greek text with Introduction and Notes. London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., 1908. pp.195. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

  • The City of Thessalonica
  • St. Paul and the Thessalonian Church
  • General Character and Contents of the Epistles
  • Langauge, Style, and Literary Affinities
  • Doctrine
  • Authenticity and Integrity
  • Authorities for the Text
  • Commentaries

Text and Notes

Analysis of 1 Thessalonians

  • Text and Notes of 1 Thessalonians
  • Analysis of 2 Thessalonians
  • Text and Notes of 2 Thessalonians

Additional Notes

  • St. Paul as a Letter-Writer
  • Did St Paul use the Epistolary Plural?
  • The Thessalonian Friends of St Paul
  • The Divine Names in the Epistles
  • On the history of euangelion, euangelizomai
  • Parousia. Epithaneia. Apokaluphis
  • On atakteo and its cognates
  • On the meanings of katexo
  • The Biblical Doctrine of Antischrist
  • The history of the interpretation of 2 Thess. ii. 1-12

Indexes

Subjects

Authors

References

  1. Inscriptions and Papyri
    (a) Inscriptions
    (b) Papyri
  2. Judaistic Writings

Greek Words

Preface

The Epistles to the Thessalonians can hardly be said to have received at the hands of English scholars the attention they deserve, in view not only of their own intrinsic interest, but of the place which they occupy in the Sacred Canon. They are generally believed to be the earliest of St Paul’s extant Epistles, and, if so, are, in all probability, the oldest Christian documents of importance that have come down to us. Certainly no other of the Pauline writings give us a clearer idea of the character of the Apostle’s missionary preaching, or present a more living picture of the surroundings of the primitive Christian Church. A detailed study of their contents is essential, therefore, to· a proper understanding of the Apostolic Age, and forms the best introduction to the more developed interpretation of Christian thought, which we are accustomed to describe as Paulinism.

p.vii.

Commentary on Romans by Handley Moule

Handley Carr Glyn Moule [1841-1920], The Epistle to the Romans

Handley Moule’s Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans is still regarded as being of value to preachers. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

Handley Carr Glyn Moule [1841-1920], The Epistle to the Romans. London: Pickering & Inglis Ltd., n.d. Hbk. pp.437. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Time, Place and Occasion
  2. The Writer and His Readers (Romans 1. 1-7)
  3. Good Report of the Roman Church: Paul Not Ashamed of the Gospel (Romans 1. 8-17)
  4. Need for the Gospel: God’s Anger and Man’s Sin (Romans 1. 18-23)
  5. Man Given up to his own Way: The Heathen (Romans 1. 24-32)
  6. Human Guilt Universal: He Approaches the Conscience of the Jew (Romans 2. 1-17)
  7. Jewish Responsibility and Guilt (Romans 2. 17-29)
  8. Jewish Claims: No Hope in Human Merit (Romans 3. 1-20)
  9. The One Way of Divine Acceptance (Romans 3. 21-31)
    Detached Note
  10. Abraham and David (Romans 4. 1-12)
    Detached Note
  11. Abraham (2) (Romans 4. 13-25)
  12. Peace, Love, and Joy for the Justified (Romans 5. 1-11)
    Detached Notes
  13. Christ and Adam (Romans 5. 12-21)
  14. Justification and Holiness (Romans 6. 1-13)
  15. Justification and Holiness: Illustrations from Human Life (Romans 6. 14—7. 6)
  16. The Function of the Law in the Spiritual Life (Romans 7. 7-25)
  17. The Justified: Their Life by the Holy Spirit (Romans 8. 1-11)
  18. Holiness by the Spirit, and the Glories that Shall Follow (Romans 8. 12-25)
  19. The Spirit of Prayer in the Saints: Their Present and Eternal Welfare in the Love of God (Romans 8. 26-39)
  20. The Sorrowful Problem: Jewish Unbelief: Divine Sovereignty (Romans 9. 1-33)
    Detached Note
  21. Jewish Unbelief and Gentile Faith: Prophecy (Romans 10. 1-21)
  22. Israel However Not Forsaken (Romans 11. 1-10)
  23. Israel’s Fall Overruled, for the World’s Blessing, and for Israel’s Mercy (Romans 11. 11-24)
  24. The Restoration of Israel Directly Foretold: All is of and for God (Romans 11. 25-36)
  25. Christian Conduct the Issue of Christian Truth (Romans 12. 1-8)
  26. Christian Duty: Details of Personal Conduct (Romans 12. 8-21)
  27. Christian Duty; in Civil Life and Otherwise: Love (Romans 13. 1-10)
  28. Christian Duty in the Light of the Lord’s Return and in the Power of His Presence (Romans 13. 11-14)
  29. Christian Duty: Mutual Tenderness and Tolerance: The Sacredness of Example (Romans 14.1-23)
  30. The Same Subject: The Lord’s Example: His Relation to Us all (Romans 15. 1-13)
  31. Roman Christianity: St. Paul’s Commission: His Intended Itinerary: He Asks for Prayer (Romans 15. 14-33)
  32. A Commendation: Greetings: A Warning: A Doxology (Romans 16. 1-27)

Preface

He who attempts to expound the Epistle to the Romans, when his sacred task is over, is little disposed to speak about his Commentary; he is occupied rather with an ever deeper reverence and wonder over the Text which he has been permitted to handle, a Text so full of a marvellous man, above all so full of GOD.

But it seems needful to say a few words about the style of the running Translation of the Epistle which will be found interwoven with this Exposition. The writer is aware that the translation is often rough and formless. His apology is that it has been done with a view not to a connected reading but to the explanation of details. A rough piece of rendering, which would be a misrepresentation in a continuous version, because it would be out of scale with the general style, seems to be another matter when it only calls the reader’s attention to a particular point presented for study at the moment.

Page v.