J.B. Lightfoot’s Unfinished Commentaries on Paul’s Letters

Joseph Barber Lightfoot
Joseph Barber Lightfoot

Bishop J.B. Lightfoot died before completing his commentaries on Romans, 1 Corinthians, Ephesians and 1 & 2 Thessalonians. His notes on these books were gathered together and published in this volume. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Joseph Barber Lightfoot [1828-1889], Notes on the Epistles of Paul from Unpublished Commentaries. London & New York: MacMillan & Co., 1895. Hbk. pp.336. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Introductory Note
  1. The First Epistle to the Thessalonians
  2. The Second Epistle to the Thessalonians
  3. The First Epistle to the Corinthians
  4. The Epistle to the Romans
  5. The Epistle to the Ephesians
  • Indices

Introductory Note

The present work represents the fulfilment of the undertaking announced in the preface to ‘Biblical Essays’ a year and a half ago. As that volume consisted of introductory essays upon New Testament subjects, so this comprises such of Dr Lightfoot’s notes on the text as in the opinion of the Trustees of the Lightfoot Fund are sufficiently complete to justify publication. However, unlike ‘Biblical Essays,’ of which a considerable part had already been given to the world, this volume, as its title-page indicates, consists entirely of unpublished matter. It aims at reproducing, wherever possible, the courses of lectures delivered at Cambridge by Dr Lightfoot upon those Pauline Epistles which he did not live to edit in the form of complete commentaries. His method of trusting to his memory in framing sentences in the lecture room has been alluded to already in the preface to the previous volume…

page v.

Commentary on the First Book of Samuel by Frank Marshall

Hannah presenting Samuel to Eli, by Jan Victors, 1645.
Hannah presenting Samuel to Eli, by Jan Victors, 1645. Source: Wikipedia.

This is Frank Marshall’s Commentary on 1 Samuel – part of a series written for Schools and Colleges. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Frank Marshall [1848-1906], The First Book of Samuel, 17th edn., 1932. London: George Gill & Sons, Ltd., 1894. Hbk. pp.136. [Click to visit the download page

Table of Contents

  • Introduction to the First Book of Samuel
    • The Title
    • The Author
    • The Design of the Writer
    • Date
    • Scope of the First Book of Samuel
    • Sources of the Narrative
    • The Ark
    • The God of the Heathen
    • Prophets and Prophesying
    • Sacrifices
    • Historical Summary
      • The Days of Eli
      • The Family of Eli
      • The Days of Samuel
      • The Days of Saul
      • The Family of Saul
      • The Days of David
        • His Character and Personal Qualitiies
        • His Early Life
        • His Life at Court
        • David in Exile
        • The Family of Jesse
    • Geographical Notes Biographical Note
      • The Land
      • Nations and Tribes
      • Geographical Notes
      • Biographical Notes
    • Analysis of the First Book of Samuel
  • The First Book of Samuel, Marginal and Footnotes
  • Comments on the Revised Version
  • Words. and Phrases Explained
  • Passages Illustrative of First Book of Samuel
  • Appendix

Preface

The First Book of Samuel is one of a series of manuals on the books of the Old· Testament, which are primarily intended for the use of Students preparing for the Local Examinations of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

The Introduction treats fully of the several subjects with which the Student should be acquainted, comprising full Geographical and Biographical Notes, and other important details, which are clearly set forth in the Table of Contents. The special features in the narrative are fully commented upon.

The chief alterations of the Revised Version are pointed out in footnotes, the Student being referred to the Revised Version. In the Appendix will be found (1) a Commentary upon the most important differences between the Authorised and Revised Versions, the alterations being pointed out and explanations given of the reasons for the changes; (2) an Explanation of words and phrases, thus avoiding constant reference to the text and notes…

J.B. Mayor’s Commentary on the Epistle of James

The first page of James in Minuscule 319, a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament.

The first page of James in Minuscule 319, a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament. Source: Wikipedia

James Bickersteth Mayor’s commentary is generally recognised as one of the finest works on the epistle of James of all time. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Joseph Bickersteth Mayor [1828-1916], The Epistle of James. The Greek Text with Introduction and Comments, 2nd edition. London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd. / New York: The Macmillan Company, 1897. Hbk. pp.cclx +256. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Addenda Et Corrigenda
  1. The Author
  2. External For the Authenticity of the Epistle
  3. Relation of the Epistle to Earlier Writings
  4. Relation of the Epistle to the Other Books of the New Testament
  5. The Contents of the Epistle
  6. Persons to Whom the Epistle is Addressed and Place From Which it is Written
  7. On the Date of the Epistle / Harnack and Spitta on the Date of the Epistle
  8. On the Grammar of St James
  9. On the Style of St. James
  10. Did St. James Write in Greek or in Aramaic?
  11. Bibliography
  12. Apparatus Criticus
  • Text of St James
  • Notes
  • Paraphrase and Comments
  • Index

Preface To The First Edition

In writing my Preface I bring to a close a work which has for some years been my chief occupation, and which has indeed been seldom out of my thoughts since the time when, as an undergraduate, I first made acquaintance with Coleridge’s Aids to Reflection, and was led in consequence to study with some care the Epistle of St. James, to which reference is made in the earlier Aphorisms of that book.

In the Introduction I have stated my reasons for believing this Epistle to be the earliest of the books of the New Testament, written probably in the fifth decade of the Christian era by one who had been brought up with Jesus from his childhood and whose teaching is in many points identical with the actual words of our Lord as recorded in the Synoptic Gospels. If I am not mistaken, it presents to its a picture of pre-Pauline Christianity, which is not only interesting historically, but is likely to be of special value in an age of religious doubt and anxiety like the present…

Page vii.