Commentary on Philippians by Alfred Plummer

Ancient theatre - Philippi
Ancient theatre – Philippi. Photo Credit: MrPanyGoff

Alfred Plummer’s Commentary on Philippians has been reprinted many times, which I take as a confirmation of its ongoing value to Bible students. The text uses some Greek, but not enough to make it difficult for those with no knowledge of the original language to use. This title is in the public domain.

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], A Commentary on St. Paul’s Epistle to the Philippians. London: Robert Scott, 1919. Hbk. pp.115. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Commentary
  • Index

Introduction

The passage of the Gospel from Eastern to Western civilization is an event of the highest importance and interest in the history of the Christian Church. With the exception of the extension of the offer of salvation from Jews to Gentiles, there is hardly anything of greater importance in the progress of Apostolic Christianity. It was an advance from a world in which the best elements of civilization were to be found in Judaism, to a world in which the best elements were centred in the art and literature of Greece, and in the military and political organization of Rome. Divine religion was seeking friendship with human philosophy and human law.

It did not come uninvited. Macedonia, half Greek and half Roman, took the initiative under special guidance from heaven. The Spirit intimated that St. Paul, Silas and Timothy were not to preach the word in Asia, Mysia, or Bithynia….

Commentaries on Philippians, Colossians and Philemon by Charles J. Ellicott

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905]
Charles J. Ellicott By Herbert R. Barraud (died 1896), Public Domain. Source: Wikipedia Commons,
Charles J. Ellicott [1819-1905] was Professor of Divinity at King’s College London, Hulsean Professor of Divinity at Cambridge University and Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol [See Wikipedia article]

These are detailed commentaries on the Greek text of Paul’s letters to the Philippians, Colossians and to Philemon. Despite their age Charles Ellicott’s commentaries are still being reprinted. This title is in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], A Critical and Grammatical Commentary on St. Paul’s Epistles to the Philippians, Colossians and to Philemon with a Revised Translation. London: John W. Parker & Son, 1857. Hbk. pp.268. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • The Epistle to the Philippians
  • The Epistle to the Colossians
  • The Epistle to Philemon

Preface

The present volume forms the fourth portion of my Commentary on St. Paul’s Epistles, and contains an exposition of the important Epistles to the Philippians and Colossians, and of the graceful and touching Epistle to Philemon.

The notes will be found to reflect the same critical and grammatical characteristics, and to recognise the same principles of interpretation as those which I endeavoured to follow in the earlier portions of this work, and on which the experiences slowly and laboriously acquired during this undertaking have taught me year by year more confidently to rely. There is, however, a slight amount of additional matter which it is perhaps desirable to briefly specify.

In the first place, I have been enabled to carry out more fully and completely a system of reference to the great Versions of antiquity, and have spared no pains to approach a little more nearly to those fresh and clear, yet somewhat remote, well-heads of Christian interpretation…

Charles J. Ellicott’s Commentary on the Letters to the Thessalonians

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905]
Portrait of Bishop Charles Ellicott By Herbert R. Barraud (died 1896) – Public Domain. Source: Wikipedia
This is a detailed commentary on the Greek text of Paul’s Letters to the Thessalonians by Biship Charles Ellicott. As such those with a good knowledge of Greek will benefit most from it. This title is in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], St. Paul’s Epistles to the Thessalonians: With a critical and Grammatical commentary and a revised translation, 4th edn. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts & Green, 1880. Hbk. pp.167. [Click here to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the Third Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • 1 Thessalonians
  • 2 Thessalonians

Introduction

This calm, practical, and profoundly consolatory Epistle was written by the Apostle to his converts in the wealthy and populous city of Thessalonica not long after his first visit to Macedonia ( Acts xvi. 9), when in conjunction with Silas and Timothy he laid the foundations of the Thessalonian Church (Acts xvii. 1 sq.). See notes on ch. i. 1.

The exact time of writing the Epistle appears to have been the early months of the Apostle’s year and a half stay at Corinth (Acts xviii. 11), soon after Timothy had joined him (1 Thess. iii. 6) and reported the spiritual state of their converts, into which he had been sent to enquire (eh. iii. 2), probably from Athens; see notes on eh. iii. 1. We may thus consider the close of A.D. 52, or the beginning of A.D. 53, as the probable date, and, if this be correct, must place the Epistle first on the chronological list of the Apostle’s writings….