Book of Judges with Introduction and Notes by Charles Fox Burney

Maop of Central Palestine from C.F> Burney, The Book of Judges

This is Charles Fox Burney’s 1918 commentary on the book of Judges, complete with colour maps and greyscale plates. This title is in the public domain.

Charles Fox Burney [1868-1925], editor, The Book of Judges with Introduction and Notes. London: Rivingtons. 1918. Hbk. pp.528. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Addenda
  • Principle Abbreviations Employed
  • Introduction
    1. Title, Scope, and Place in the Canon
    2. Structure
    3. The Old Narratives
    4. The Editors
    5. Chronology
    6. External Information Bearing on the Period of Judges
    7. The Permanent Religious Value of Judges
    8. The Hebrew Text and Ancient Versions
  • Translation and Commentary
  • Additional Notes
    • External Evidence for the Use of the Terms ‘Cana’an’ and ‘The Land of the Amorite’
    • Sedek as a Divine Name
    • The Meaning of the Name Kiriath-Arba’
    • The Conquest of the Negeb
    • The Original Form of J’s Account of the Settlement of the Tribes of Israel in Cana’an
    • A Detailed Examination of the Rhythm of the Song of Deborah
    • The Climactic Parallelism of the Song of Deborah
    • The Language of the Song of Deborah
    • Yahweh or Yahu Originally an Amorite Deity
    • Early Identification of Yahweh with the Moon-God
    • The Use of Writing Among the Israelites at the Time of the Judges
    • Human Sacrifice Among the Israelites
    • The Women’s Festival of Judges 11:40
    • The Mythical Elements in the Story of Samson
    • The Origin of the Levites
  • Description of the Plates
  • Note on the Maps of Palestine
  • Indices:-
    1. General Index
    2. Index of Grammatical and Philological Observations
    3. Index of Foreign Terms: Hebrew (Including Cana’anite); Babylonian and Assyrian (Including Sumerian); Aramaic (Including Syriac); Arabic; Greek, Latin
    4. Index of Passages from Other Books Discussed
  • Maps:-
    • Western Asia in the Second Millennium B.C.
    • The District Round Gibe’ah
    • Palestine (five maps)
  • Plates

Open Source Commentary Survey – December Update

Commentaries for Digitisation
A collection of books and Commentaries recently supplied by Book Aid for Digitisation
Dr Pieter Lalleman has now completed the first three commentary reviews. I have uploaded them so that you can see how they function within the Biblical Studies site here. I think that placing them within the bibliographies – and not on a separate page – will maximise their accessibility. They also serve as exemplars of the type and length of review I am looking for. I have also added a new information page here.
 
I am still looking for more volunteers to write reviews, so if you are able to help, please contact me.
 
 

Commentary on 2 Peter and Jude by E.H. Plumptre

Edward Hayes Plumptre [1821-1891], St. Peter & St. Jude with Notes and IntroductionEdward Hayes Plumptre was Dean of Wells Cathedral. Wikipedia notes, Plumptre:

…wrote much on the interpretation of scripture, endeavouring to combine and popularise, in no superficial fashion, the results attained by labourers in special sections of the subject. He contributed to the commentaries known respectively as the Cambridge Bible, the Speaker’s Commentary, that edited by Bishop Ellicott, and the Bible Educator. He also wrote Biblical Studies, 1870 (3rd edit. 1885), St. Paul in Asia (1877), a Popular Exposition of the Epistles to the Seven Churches (1877 and 1879), Movements in Religious Thought: Romanism, Protestantism, Agnosticism (1879), and Theology and Life (1884). His most remarkable theological work was The Spirits in Prison, and other studies on Life after Death (1884 and 1885). The book comprises a review of previous teaching on the subject of eschatology. His characteristic sympathy with ‘the larger hope’ is moderated throughout by a characteristic caution. He had passed beyond the influence of Maurice, and, though his loyal admiration for his earlier teacher remained unchanged, he had rejected his conclusions.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Edward Hayes Plumptre [1821-1891], St. Peter & St. Jude with Notes and Introduction. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1893. Hbk pp.220. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
  3. Index

Introduction. The Training of the Disciple

The early years of the Apostle whose writings are now before us appear to have been passed in the village of Bethsaida (=Fishtown, or more literally Home of Fish), on the West coast of the Sea of Galilee, not far from Chorazin and Capernaum (John i. 44). Its exact position cannot be determined with any certainty, but it has been identified with the modern ‘Ain et Tabi’galt, and must be distinguished from the town of the same name on the North-Eastern shore of the Lake, which, after it had been enlarged and rebuilt by Philip the Tetrarch, was known as Bethsaida Julias, the latter name having been 1 given to it in honour of the daughter of the Emperor Augustus.

Among the fishermen from whose occupation the town derived its name was one who bore the name either of Jona (John i. 42; Matt. xvi. 17) or Joannes (in the best MSS. of John xxi. 15-17)…