Blog Interview: Helen Thorne – London City Mission’s Pioneer Programme

My wife brought my attention to a post of the Affinity website about the training of ministers. She noted that there was a very helpful comment by Helen Thorne or London City Mission and suggested that I contact Helen to interview her for my blog series. Helen has kindly agreed to take part.

1) Please introduce yourself and your role at London City Mission

Helen ThorneMy name is Helen Thorne and I’m the Director of Training and Mentoring at London City Mission.

2) Tell us a little about London City Mission

London City Mission was founded in 1835 with the specific remit of taking the Good News of Jesus to the people of London, especially the poor. The Industrial Revolution created slums where many people lived in physical and spiritual poverty, London City Mission was established to bring them true and lasting hope. Today, our missionaries continue to work among the “least-reached” communities of our capital city – serving alongside local churches to share Jesus with those living on deprived estates, those from other cultures / faiths, those living or working on the streets and those caught up in gang or prison-life.

It’s an exciting ministry but not an easy one so we are committed to offering high-quality training to our staff and to local churches who share a passion for the lost. For newer Christians, we offer a 2-year, one day a week “Foundation Course” covering the basic biblical theology and practical evangelism needed for urban ministry. For more mature Christians, we offer our 2-year, one day a week “Urban Mission Course” which looks at biblical, historical, doctrinal and practical aspects of city mission in more depth. We work in partnership with Moorlands College and The Message Trust to offer a short course in “Christian Community Development and Evangelism” and are the London Hub for Union School of Theology’s Graduate Diploma in Theology. Each year we run a 5-day summer school in urban mission, a series of Practical Evangelism Training days and a range of Muslim Engagement Training courses too.

Our flagship course is our Pioneer Programme. Open to younger Christians from deprived backgrounds who may have few educational qualifications, we offer a 2-year, 3-day a week programme which enables people to access training while staying rooted in their local church. The programme includes lectures, mentoring, practical experience alongside one of our missionaries and a chance to spearhead a pioneering gospel-centred project in their local area.

3) Are the courses full time, part-time or a mixture of both?

London City Mission Training

All our courses are part-time which means people can stay serving in their local church and work around their studies.

4) How do London City Mission students fund their studies?

We keep our courses low-cost – and there are reduced rates for the retired, unemployed and those working in self-supporting ministry roles so most people can pay fees from their earnings. The Pioneer Programme is unique in that we pay people to train with us! Places are limited to about 10 a year but we love to serve local churches in this way.

5) Does London City Mission take students from overseas?

Usually our students are already living within commuting distance of London. International students who are interested in courses – particularly the summer school – should contact the training department for more details.

Pioneer Programme class

6) What type of ministry is London City Mission intended to prepare students for?

All our courses are designed to equip people for mission within the least-reached communities of the city. Our students range from new Christians with no qualifications to pastors who want to supplement their degrees – it’s a wonderful mix of people who can sharpen each other well.

7) When students leave London what kind of ministries / jobs do they go into?

Our aim is to equip people to serve where they are. We are passionate about training our own staff and volunteers – we are passionate about training people who want to serve better within their local church. A few of our students go off to serve in other mission agencies too and it’s a privilege to have equipped them.

LCM Pioneers May 2017

8) What is distinctive about what London City Mission offers compared with other colleges in the UK and overseas?

Our focus on part-time courses that concentrate on reaching the least-reached communities in our urban setting, welcome people with no prior learning and leave people embedded in their local chur

ch is a pretty unique combination. We hope and pray that’s a great spur to the church’s call to “equip the saints for works of service”

9) Please tell us about the library and other research facilities.

We’re working on the establishment of an Urban Mission library  … but we’re not quite there yet!

10) Does London City Mission offer a distance or on-line learning option?

Check back in 2019!

To read more blog interviews click here

Commentary on the Book of Joshua by G.F. Maclear

George Frederick Maclear [1833-1902], The Book of Joshua.

This commentary on the Book of Joshua was written by the Rev. George Frederick Maclear [1833-1902], Warden of St Augustine’s, Canterbury and headmaster of King’s College School, London. This book is in the public domain and includes a couple of helpful maps.

George Frederick Maclear [1833-1902], The Book of Joshua. J.J.S. Perowne, gen.ed., The Cambridge Bible for Schools. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 18973. Hbk. pp.228. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  1. Introduction
    1. The Book of Joshua
    2. The Life of Joshua
    3. The Work of Joshua
    4. Joshua as a type of Christ
    5. Analysis of the book
  2. Text and Notes
  3. General Index
  4. Index of Words and Phrases explained

Introduction

1. The Pentateuch is followed in the Jewish Canon by a series which bears the name of Neviim Rishonim, “the earlier Prophets 1”, and comprises Joshua, Judges, the first and second Books of Samuel, and the two Books of Kings. This series contains the history of the Israelites,

(a) As governed by the successor of Moses and the elders who outlived him;

(b) As governed by native kings;

(c) As subject to foreign invaders.

2. The first of these Books, the Book of Joshua, derives its name, not from its Author, but from the great hero, whose exploits are therein related, and who succeeded to the command of the people after the death of the great Hebrew Lawgiver, and led the nation into the Promised Land.

3. The claims of the Book to a place in the Canon of the Old Testament have never been disputed, and its authority is confirmed by allusions to the events recorded in it, which are found in other Books of Holy Scripture. [Continue reading]

More resources on the book of Joshua can be found here

Commentary on the Book of Judges by Professor J.J. Lias

John James Lias [1834-1923], The Book of JudgesAccording to WikiSource John James Lias [1834-1923] was Chancellor of Llandaff Cathedral and Hulsean Lecturer in Divinity and Lady Margaret Preacher at the University of Cambridge. This is the full text of his commentary on the Book of Judges. This title is in the public domain.

John James Lias [1834-1923], The Book of Judges, J.J.S. Perowne, gen.ed., The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1884. Hbk. pp.220. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Introduction
    1. Contents, Authorship and Date, Genuineness, Canonicity, of the Book of Judges
    2. The Political, Moral, and Religious condition of Israel under the Judges
    3. The Personal character of the Judges
    4. The Song of Deborah
    5. The Chronology of the Period
    6. Analysis
  2. Texts and Notes
  3. Appendix
  4. Index

Introduction

I. Contents. The book of Judges consists of three parts. The first part (ch. i. 1, iii. 7) forms an Introduction, obviously designed to connect the book with the previous narrative in Joshua. We have first a description of the condition of the Israelites immediately after Joshua’s death, and their relations with the Phoenician peoples whom Joshua had left only half subdued (ch. i. i-ii. 10). Then (ch. ii. ii-iii. 7) the writer proceeds to give a brief summary of his history chiefly from a moral and religious point of view, pointing out the cause of national misfortunes, namely the disobedience of the people to the national law, and their apostasy from the national religion. The second part (ch. iii. 8-xvi. 31) contains the history of the Judges. In the third part (ch. xvii. to end) the historian adds two episodes of a more private and personal character… [Continue reading]