Commentary on Revelation by Alfred Plummer

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], Revelation. The Pulpit Commentary

This is a commentary on the book of Revelation in The Pulpit Commentary series by Alfred Plummer. It presented difficulties in scanning because of the very poor quality of the paper used. My previous scanner was unequal to the challenge, but my new one has at least provided a readable result, even if it is not up the quality I would like. Plummer also wrote a commentary on the letters of John in the same series, which I will look out for.

My thank to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain work for digitisation.

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], Revelation. The Pulpit Commentary. London & New York: Funk & Wagnalls Co., 1909. Hbk. pp.585. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
    1. The Title
    2. Author
    3. Date
    4. Place
    5. Manuscripts
    6. Versions
    7. Quotations
    8. History of the Printed Text
    9. Character of the Greek
    10. Authenticity
  • Commentary
  • Index

Introduction. 1. The Title

The Revelation. – The name given to this book in our Bibles is the English form of the Latin equivalent of the Greek title Apokaluphis. This Greek title is as old as the book itself, and forms the first word of the original text, where it constitutes an essential member of the opening sentence and paragraph. It was consistent with the Hebrew cast of the whole document that the Hebrew fashion of naming books by their initial words should be followed in this instance; but the classical and modern method of designating a. literary work by the name ‘of its principal theme happened here ‘to lead to the same resnlt: Apokaluphis is not only the initial word of the book, but also a subject-title, descriptive of the largest portion of the contents.

In the Vulgate version the Greek word is retained, both in the title and at the commencement of the text. Its proper Latin equivalent, however, is not found by merely writing it in Latin letters, apocalypsis, but by combining the Latin renderings of its two component parts, taking re to represent apo and velatio as synonymous with kaluphis. According to the etymological genius of the respective languages, just as the simple substantive velatio, or kaluphis, signified the act of covering with a veil, so the compound re-velatio, or apo-kaluphis, meant the act of removing, turning back, or taking off the veil, in such a manner as to discover what previously was hidden from view.

The Latin compound, unaltered except by the Anglicizing of its termination, has become thoroughly naturalized in our English language; and on that account it is, for biblical and ministerial use, preferable to the original title, which, even in its Anglicized form, “Apocalypse,” has never ceased to be “Greek” to ordinary English ears….

Pages i-ii

Evangelical Quarterly Volume 86 (2014) on-line

Evangelical Quarterly Volume 86 (2014) front cover

BiblicalStudies.org.uk provides the on-line archive for The Evangelical Quarterly, subject to the permission of the authors, who usually hold the rights to these articles. There is a five year delay between publication and the articles appearing in the archive. Most of the material from Volume 86 (2014) is now available for free download. It contains a good variety of subject matter: from the trinity to hermeneutics; early church history to eschatology, and so should provide something of interest to most readers.

My thanks to the authors who have granted permission for their articles to be hosted here. More may appear later, so be sure to visit the main Evangelical Quarterly archive for updates and the download links.

Table of Contents

86.1

John Wilks, “Editorial,”: 3-5.

Fred Sanders, “Redefining Progress in Trinitarian Theology: Stephen R. Holmes on the Trinity,”: 6-20.

Jason Radcliff, “T.F. Torrance in the light of Stephen Holmes’s Critique of Contemporary Trinitarian Thought,”: 21-38.

Jon Mackenzie, “A Double-Headed Luther? A Lutheran Response to The Holy Trinity by Stephen R. Holmes,”: 39-54.

Kevin Giles, “A personal response to Stephen R. Holmes,”: 55-62.

John E. Colwell, “A Conversation Overheard: Reflecting on the Trinitarian Grammar of Intimacy and Substance,”: 63-76.

86.2

Bernardo Cho, “Subverting Slavery: Philemon, Onesimus, and Paul’s Gospel of Reconciliation,”: 99-115.

Gregory R. Goswell, “The book of Ruth and the house of David,”: 116-129.

Peter Ensor, “Tertullian and penal substitutionary atonement,”: 130-142.

Andrew Gregory, “Patristic study debunked – or redivivus? A review article,”: 143-155.

86.3

Michael Strickland, “Redaction Criticism on Trial: The Cases of A.B. Bruce and Robert Gundry,” Andrew Gregory, “Patristic study debunked – or redivivus? A review article,”: 195-209.

Benjamin L. Merkle & W. Tyler Krug, “Hermeneutical Challenges for a Premillennial Interpretation of Revelation 20,”: 210-226.

Laurie Guy, “Back to the Future: The Millennium and the Exodus in Revelation 20,”: 227-238.

Nicholas P. Lunn, “‘Let my people go!’ The exodus as Israel’s metaphorical divorce from Egypt,”: 239-251.

86.4

Timothy C. Tennent, “Postmodernity, the Paradigm and the Pre-Eminence of Christ,”: 291-302.

Stanley E. Porter, “The Authority of the Bible as a Hermeneutical Issue,”: 303-324.

Benjamin Sargent, “Biblical hermeneutics and the Zurich Reformation,” Timothy C. Tennent, “Postmodernity, the Paradigm and the Pre-Eminence of Christ,”: 325-342.

Mark Saucy, “Personal Ethics of the New Covenant: How Does the Spirit Change Us?” Evangelical Quarterly 86.4 (Oct. 2014): 343-378.

BETH Conference 2019 Day 4: Regent’s Park College & Angus Library

Regent’s Park College

Today delegates to the BETH Conference were able to visit the library at Regent’s Park College, a permanent private hall of the University of Oxford. The pictures below are of the theology and church history sections in the library.

Angus Library and Archive

Within Regent’s Park College is housed the Angus Library and Archive, which holds over 100,000 books and other items in its collection. These consist of the papers of leading Baptist figures from the 18h Century to today, the archive of the Baptist Missionary Society (BMS), as well as historic Baptist church records and minute books. The librarian was kind enough to put out on display some of the more unusual items from the collection, including a copy of the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493), the diaries of the pioneering female medical missionary Dr Ellen Farrer, one of William Carey’s Journals, a Tyndale New Testament, a first edition of John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress and a necklace made from leopard’s teeth!