Commentary on St Matthew by M.F. Sadler

Michael Ferrebee Sadler [1819-1895], The Gospel to St Matthew with Notes Critical and Practical, 2nd edn.

Rev Michael Ferrebee Sadler [1819-1895] provides a fairly detailed commentary on the English text of Matthew’s Gospel.

My thanks to Book Aid for making available a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Michael Ferrebee Sadler [1819-1895], The Gospel to St Matthew with Notes Critical and Practical, 2nd edn. London: George Bell & Sons, 1901. Hbk. pp.494. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  1. Preface to Second Edition
  2. Introduction
  3. Commentary
  4. Excursus I. The Genealogies
  5. Excursus II. The Star of the Magi
  6. Excursus III. The Primacy of St. Peter

Introduction. 1. The Origin and Sources of the Four Gospels

The account of the Life, Death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ, which has come down to us in the Four Gospels, was not at the first given to the Church in a. written form, but was taught orally by the preaching of the Apostles. Thus in the notice of the first Church-that which was founded in Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost-it is said of those who belonged to it, that they “continued stedfastly in the Apostles’ teaching,” or “doctrine,” though no Gospel was written till many years afterwards.

Throughout the history of the planting of the Christian Church in various cities and countries, which we have in the Acts of the Holy Apostles-an account covering at least thirty years-we have no mention of any book from which the first Christians were taught respecting the Son of God.

That book of the New Testament which almost all agree in considering the first put into writing is the First Epistle of St. Paul to the Thessalonians, and throughout that Epistle it is taken for granted that the members of the local Church, for whose sake it was written, had been instructed in all needful truth, and only required to be reminded of what they had learnt.

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Brooke Foss Westcott’s Commentary on the Epistles of John

Brooke Foss Westcott [1825-1901], The Epistles of John. The Greek Text with Notes and Essays, 2nd edn.

This is the fourth of Bishop Westcott’s commentaries that I have been able to digitise. You can find the full list here. My thanks to Book Aid for making this public domain title for digitisation.

Brooke Foss Westcott [1825-1901], The Epistles of John. The Greek Text with Notes and Essays, 2nd edn. Cambridge & London: Macmillan & Co. Ltd., 1886. Hbk. pp.378. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Introduction to the First Epistle
  • Introduction to the Second and Third Epistles
  • First Epistle: Text and Notes
  • Second Epistle: Text and Notes
  • Third Epistle: Text and Notes
  1. The Two Empires: The Church and the World
  2. The Gospel of Creation
  3. The Relation of Christianity to Art

Preface

In the present Commentary I have endeavoured to follow the plan which I sketched in the notes on the Gospel of St John in The Speaker’s Commentary. It formed no part of my design to collect and discuss the conflicting opinions which have been held on the structure of the writings or on the interpretation of separate passages. Such a labour is indeed of the deepest interest and utility; but it appeared to me that I might help the student more by giving the results at which I have arrived, and by indicating the lines of inquiry by which they have been reached. In pursuing this end it has been my main desire to call attention to the minutest points of language, construction, order, as serving to illustrate the meaning of St John. I do not venture to pronounce that any variation is trivial or unimportant. The exact words are for us the decisive expression of the Apostle’s thought….

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Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles by Richard Belward Rackham

Richard Belward Rackham [1863-1912], The Acts of the Apostles. An Exposition, 10th edn., 1925

Richard Belward Rackham’s commentary on Acts is written from a conservative viewpoint, focusing on the Greek text and historical background. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy for digitisation.

Richard Belward Rackham [1863-1912], The Acts of the Apostles. An Exposition, 10th edn., 1925. London: Methuen & Co. Ltd., 1901. Hbk. pp.524. [Click to visit the Acts page for the download link for this title and other resources on this book]

Table of Contents

  1. The Book
  2. The Author
  3. The Composition of Acts
  4. The History of the Acts
  5. The Theology of the Acts
  6. The Church and Ministry in the Acts
  • The Analysis of the Acts
  • Chronological Table
  • Addenda
  • Commentary
  • Index
  • Map of the Eastern Mediterranean

Preface

The form of this commentary upon The Acts of the Apostles requires some words of explanation. Instead of breaking up the comment into disjointed notes, an attempt has been made to give a continuous interpretation which the reader can read straight on without interruption, just as he would read the book of The Acts itself. The aim has been simply to ascertain the meaning of the original text and to add the necessary information. Thus the commentary is practically a paraphrase of The Acts, in which the words of the text commented upon are distinguished by being printed in italics, and such general information or discussion as is required from time to time is inserted in the paraphrase fu separate paragraphs: further illustration which the reader can leave on one side is relegated to footnotes. If, however, this method on the one hand aims at consulting the reader’s convenience, on the other it is liable to err on the side of length and repetition, from which faults this commentary can hardly claim to be free.

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