Charles Ellicott’s Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905]
By Herbert R. Barraud (died 1896), Public Domain Source: Wikipedia.
In order to get the most from Bishop Charles Ellicott’s commentary on the Pastoral Epistles you will need a good grasp of Greek. Despite its age, this commentary still seems to be in demand, so I was very pleased to find one at Book Aid recently. This title is in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], The Pastoral Epistles of St. Paul: With a critical and Grammatical commentary and a revised translation, 3rd edn. London: Longmans, Green Reader & Dyer, 1869. Hbk. pp.263. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the Third Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on 1 Timothy
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on 2 Timothy
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on Titus
  • Translation: The First Epistle to Timothy
  • Translation: The Second Epistle to Timothy
  • Translation: The Epistle to Titus

Introduction

The date and general circumstances under which this and the accompanying Epistles were written have long been the subjects of discussion and controversy.

As our opinion on these points must first be stated, it may be said briefly,-(a) that when we duly consider that close connexion in thought, subject, expressions, and style, which exists between the First Epistle to Timothy and the other two Pastoral Epistles, it seems in the highest degree incredible that they could have been composed at intervals of time widely separated from each other. When we further consider (b) the almost insuperable difficulty in assigning any period for the composition of this group of Epistles in that portion of the Apostle’s life and labours included in the Acts; (c) the equally great or even greater difficulty in harmonizing the notes of time and place in these Epistles with those specified in the Apostle’s journeys as recorded by St Luke…

Biblical Interpretation by Edwin Cyril Blackman

Edwin Cyril Blackman, Biblical Interpretation. The Old Difficulties and the New OpportunityThis book on biblical interpretation deals with the issue of biblical authority and surveys the history of biblical interpretation. According to the blurb on the dustjacket the author “…shows the Bible is still the Word of God for mankind, and the work of the scholars enables it to be more easily understood and proclaimed by this generation”. Edwin Cyril Blackman is perhaps best known for his classic work Marcion and His Influence (SPCK, 1948).

This book is still in copyright. Permission to reproduce it on-line has been granted by E.C. Blackman’s family and the United Reformed Church. It can be used for educational purposes, but not sold for profit without permission from the copyright holders.

Edwin Cyril Blackman, Biblical Interpretation. The Old Difficulties and the New Opportunity. London: Independent Press Ltd., 1957. Hbk. pp.212. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
    1. Introductory
    2. The Question of Authority
    3. The Development of Exegesis
    4. Modern Criticism
    5. The Present Task in Biblical Interpretation
  • Index

Preface

The aim of this book is to serve ‘the cause of true exposition. The three longer chapters IV-VI are more obviously related to that purpose than the others. Chapter IV is historical, and tries to give an impression of how Christian teachers and preachers through nineteen centuries have in fact expounded the Bible. Chapter VI is intended to be a climax in that it ventures to lay down canons of exegesis for the preacher today. It seemed advisable to preface these larger chapters with some discussion of issues about which it is essential for the preacher to have a right judgment: the significance of the Bible as Revelation, the authority of the Bible in the setting of the general problem of moral and spiritual authority, and the function and limits of historical criticism as applied to the Bible….

For more resources on biblical hermeneutics click here.

Charles J. Ellicott’s Commentary on the New Testament

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], editor, A New Testament commentary for English readers various writers, 3 Vols., 3rd ednCharles J. Ellicott edited a multi-volume commentary on the Bible in the 1870s which is still being reprinted today. This is the three volume New Testament set.

I am looking for the Old Testament volumes in poor condition which I can disbind and scan. If anyone knows of one, please let me know. These volumes are in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], editor, A New Testament commentary for English readers various writers, 3 Vols., 3rd edn. London: Cassell, Petter & Galpin, [1877-79]. Hbk. pp.554+468+641. [Click to visit the download page]

Volume 1

The Gospel According to St. Matthew, St. Mark, and St. Luke by Edward Hayes Plumtre [1821-1891]

The Gospel According to St. John by Henry William Watkins [1844-1922]

Volume 2

The Acts of the Apostles by Edward Hayes Plumtre [1821-1891]

Romans by William Sanday [1843-1920]

1 Corinthians by Thomas Teignmouth Shore [1841-1911]

2 Corinthians by Edward Hayes Plumtre [1821-1891]

Galatians by William Sanday [1843-1920]

Volume 3

Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and Philemon by Alfred Barry [1826-1910]

Thessalonians, I & II and St. Peter I by Arthur James Mason [1851-1928]

Timothy I & II, and Titus by Henry Donald Maurice Spence [1836-1917]

Hebrews by William Fiddian Moulton [1835-1898]

St. James by Elgood George Punchard [1844-1917]

St Peter II and Jude by Alfred Plummer [1841-1926]

St John, Epistles I, II & 3 by William Macdonald Sinclair [1850-1917]

Revelation by William Boyd Carpenter [1841-1918]