Charles Ellicott’s Commentary on Ephesians on-line

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905]
Charles J. Ellicott By Herbert R. Barraud (died 1896), Public Domain. Source: Wikipedia Commons,
Charles J. Ellicott [1819-1905] was during his distinguished career Professor of Divinity at King’s College London, Hulsean Professor of Divinity at Cambridge University and Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol [See Wikipedia article]. Ellicott wrote several detailed commentaries on the Greek Text of several New Testament books. Readers with good NT Greek will benefit most from this book. This title is in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], St. Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians: With a critical and grammatical commentary, and a revised translation, 4th revised edn. London: Longmans, Green Reader & Dyer, 1868. Hbk. pp.190. [Click to visit the main download page]

Table of Contents

  • Advertisement to the Fourth Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Introduction
  • Commentary
  • Translation

Preface to First Edition

The following pages form the second part of a Commentary on St Paul’s Epistles, founded on the same principles and constructed on the same plan as that on the Epistle to the Galatians.

As I explained somewhat at length in the preface to that Epistle the general principles, critical, grammatical, and exegetical, upon which this Commentary has been attempted, I will now only make a few special observations on this present portion of the work, and record my obligations to those expositors who have more particularly devoted themselves to this Epistle.

With regard to the present Commentary, I must remind the reader, that as in style, matter, and logical connexion, this sublime Epistle differs considerably from that to the Galatians, so the Commentary must necessarily in many respects reflect these differences and distinctions. Several points of grammatical interest which particularly characterized the former Epistle are scarcely perceptible in the present…

For more resources on the Book of Ephesians visit this page.

Samuel and His Age by George C.M. Douglas

George Cunningham Monteath Douglas [1826-1904], Samuel and His Age. A Study in the Constitutional History of Israel. This is a detailed study of the life and times of the prophet Samuel. I picked this copy up at Book Aid whilst assisting with the reorganisation of the bookshop and noticed that it had previously been part of Professor Donald J. Wiseman’s library. This title is in the public domain.

George Cunningham Monteath Douglas [1826-1904], Samuel and His Age. A Study in the Constitutional History of Israel. Edinburgh: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1901. Hbk. pp.276. [CLick to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  1. Historical Position of Samuel Vindicated
  2. Relation of Samuel and David to Moses and Joshua
  3. The Childhood and Youth of Samuel
  4. The Prophetic Office of Samuel
  5. The Priestly Work of Samuel
  6. Samuel as Judge
  7. Samuel hands over his Office as Judge to a King
  8. How Saul was There Times made King by Samuel
  9. The Completeness of this quiet Revolution by Samuel
  10. Literary Relationship of 1 Samuel to the earlier Books
  11. Recapitulation
  • Appendix
  • Index

Preface

There are certain conspicuous personalities in the history of the Kingdom of God in the Old Testament, men whose lives form epochs in the opening up of His ways to His people. Moses is immeasurably the grandest of these. Probably the next to him is Samuel ; and just as we understand Samuel, his character, his position, his offices, and his work, or fail to understand him, we shall succeed in understanding, or shall fail to understand, very much of Jehovah’s dealings with Israel. There is one very marked resemblance between Moses and Samuel-both exercised the three great functions in the Hebrew Commonwealth, those of prophet, priest, and supreme ruler, combining in their own persons three offices which in ordinary circumstances were jealously kept separate.

It is matter of deep and unfeigned regret to me that the scholars who form what is commonly known as the Critical School….

How to Study the English Bible by R.B. Girdlestone

Robert Baker Girdlestone [1836-1923], How to Study the English BibleThis little book was written to help new Christians understand how to read the Bible by Robert Baker Girdlestone [1836-1923], the first Principal of Wycliffe Hall in Oxford. As such it remains of enduring value. This title is in the public domain.

Robert Baker Girdlestone [1836-1923], How to Study the English Bible. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1887. Hbk. pp.112. [Click to visit the main download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  1. A Description of the English Bible
  2. The Bible the Word of God
  3. The Bible Demands Study
  4. Rules for Studying the Bible
  5. Hints on Special Books
  6. The Study of Doctrine
  7. The Practical and Devotional Use of the Bible
  8. Method and Order of Reading the Bible
  9. Useful and Order of Reading the Bible
  • Index of Subjects
  • Index of Texts

Preface

This little book is intended to supply a need felt by many students of God’s Word. They have taken in the message of salvation, they have dedicated their lives to the Master, and have said to Him, ‘Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?’ The answer to this question lies in the Scriptures, and they have begun to read their Bible in order to learn the will of God. But they soon feel that there are two ways of reading, – a right and a wrong way; and they look out for some practical guidance which may enable them to make the best of God’s Word.

The following pages are offered with a view of meeting this desire.

May God bless them to the reader’s use!

For more resources on how to read the Bible, please go here.