Expository & Devotional Study of the Life of Elisha

Elisha raising the Shunammites Son. Source: Wikipedia
Elisha raising the Shunammites Son. Source: Wikipedia

Alexander Stewart’s study of the life of Elisha reminds me very much of A.W. Pink’s book on Elijah which was published 30 years or so later. My thanks to Book Aid’s London Bookshop for providing me with a copy to digitise. This title is in the public domain.

Alexander Stewart [1870-1937], A Prophet of Grace. An Expository & Devotional Study of the Life of Elisha. Edinburgh: W.F. Henderson, [1925]. Hbk. pp.268. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. The Call to Office
  2. The Equipment for the Work
  3. The Quest of the Strong Men
  4. The Healing of the Waters
  5. The Judgment of Bethel
  6. Elisha and the Kings
  7. The Widow’s Cruse
  8. The Raising of the Shunammite’s Son
  9. The Poisoned Pottage
  10. The Man from Baal-Shalisha
  11. Naaman and the Jewish Maid
  12. Naaman and Elisha
  13. Elisha and Gehazi
  14. The Iron that Swam
  15. Elisha in Dothan
  16. The Scoffer’s Doom
  17. The Lamb Take the Prey
  18. The Restored Inheritance
  19. Carrying om Elijah’s Work
  20. Thr Arrow of the Lord’s Deliverance
  21. The Final Victory

Preface

The following pages deal with a portion of the Old Testament Scriptures which can scarcely be supposed to offer any special attraction to the modern mind, and which therefore, as a matter of fact, is to a great extent neglected alike by preachers and by. writers on Bible themes. It is indeed not too much to say. that in many quarters to-day the claim that the recorded events of the life of Elisha should be regarded as serious history would be dismissed with a derisive smile as the survival of a discredited doctrine of Scripture. This attitude is of course due to the miraculous element which occupies so large a place in the narrative. In an age when a daring challenge is being offered to the miracles of Jesus Christ Himself, it is hardly to be expected that the marvels associated with a shadowy figure which looms out from the mists of a much more distant past should be accepted as literal historical happenings. [Continue reading]

Further resources on this biblical character can found on this page.

Latest Issue of Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology available

Evangelical Association of the Caribbean

BiblicalStudies.org.uk serves as the on-line home for the Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology. CJET is the academic journal of Caribbean Evangelical Theological Association, Jamaica Theological Seminary and Caribbean Graduate School of Theology. I am very pleased to announce that Volume 16 (2017) is now available for here for free download in PDF.

Vol. 16 (2017) Table of Contents

Julie-Ann Dowding, “1 Corinthians 6: 9-11 As A Caribbean Response To The Homosexual Agenda,” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 1-26.

Zifus James, “The Reception of the Sermon on The Mount in a Caribbean Context: Matthew 5:4,” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 29-51.

Teddy Jones, “A Caribbean Theology of the Environment (Part 2),” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 52-80.

Paul Hemmings, “The Relevance of Systematic Theology For Ministry in the Caribbean,” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 81-98.

Dionne Lindo-Witter, “Book Review: Biblical Exegesis In The Apostolic Period (Richard N Longenecker),” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 99-104.

Andre Scarlett, “A Theodicy Concerning Caribbean Slavery: Towards A Theology Of Black Identity (Part 1),” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 105-131.

Delano V. Palmer, “Romans 7 Once Again,” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 132-164.

Click here to visit the volume 16 download page and explore the contents of the earlier volumes.

Tyndale House Newsletter – October 2016

Tyndale House October Newsletter

This Tyndale House Newsletter is reproduced here by permission of the Tyndale House Communications Dept.

P. Beatty III (𝔓47): The Codex, Its Scribe, and Its Text

Peter Malik, one of our recently appointed Research Associates

Peter Malik, one of our recently appointed Research Associates, is working on a daily basis on the Codex Climaci Rescriptus. Amidst this work Peter is preparing to publish his Cambridge PhD dissertation successfully completed while at Tyndale House.

Malik investigated the earliest extensive handwritten copy of the Book of Revelation. In P. Beatty III (𝔓47): The Codex, Its Scribe, and Its Text, he applies codicology, palaeography and a knowledge of scribal practice to shed new light on the text.

Due out in 2017 and using the latest developments in digital photography this data-rich publication by Brill will offer, for the first time, high-resolution colour photographs of the manuscript.

‘Where Art Thou, O Hezekiah’s Tunnel?’

Another scholar to bring a fresh look on Biblical scholarship is Dr Mary Hom with her publication in the Journal of Biblical Literature this autumn.

Dr Mary Hom with her publication in the Journal of Biblical Literature this autumn

‘Where Art Thou, O Hezekiah’s Tunnel? A Biblical Scholar Considers the Archaeological and Biblical Evidence concerning the Waterworks in 2 Chronicles 32:3-4, 30 and 2 Kings 20:20’

Journal of Biblical Literature  Vol. 135, No. 3 (Fall 2016), pp. 493-503.

Mary writes: “The increase of Iron Age archaeological discoveries in the City of David in recent years has precipitated debates regarding the identification of the tunnel that Hezekiah built, as described in 2 Chronicles 32:30 (cf. 2 Kings 20:20). The possibility of Channel II instead of Tunnel VIII as the actual conduit that Hezekiah built in response to the approaching Assyrian threat has gained increasing attention among both archaeologists and biblical literary scholars, and new discoveries in the past fifteen years have both answered questions and raised new ones. This article is a rigorous interdisciplinary evaluation of the evidence from both fields, and it may be seen that when the issue of identifying Hezekiah’s tunnel is taken in consideration with an understanding of the biblical text in its ancient Near Eastern literary milieu along with the most reliably expert findings in archaeology, several recent questions may be resolved.”

Scholarship in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Revd Christophe Sadiki of the Anglican Church of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is a land of past troubles, but future potential. Thanks to our International Scholars Programme we were able to welcome the Revd Christophe Sadiki of the Anglican Church of the Congo to Tyndale House for three months over the summer.

Christophe’s dissertation topic is “The Corruption of the Monarchy in Israel with Reference to Deuteronomy 17: 14-20; 1 Samuel 8; 1 and 2 Kings; a Look at the DRC”. He explains: “I think that this topic is pertinent in our African context where corruption is a scourge that is contributing to poverty among our people. It will challenge scholars to think about and interpret the Word of God in a way that speaks to the DRC context. Upon graduation I am planning to join the faculty at the Anglican University of Congo where I will be engaged to train leaders for the Anglican Communion in the Province of the Anglican Church of Congo.”

Christophe has clearly found these months a huge stimulus to his doctoral research and it has opened a new world of enquiry to him. The community at Tyndale House have welcomed him warmly, assisted him in so many ways, practical and academic, and provided a supportive environment for his studies. A mentor allocated to him has been assiduous in his supervision, meeting him weekly and prompting Christophe to take new avenues of thought, and compare different traditions and methods of study.

Christophe himself seems to have made the most of every moment, refusing to allow the newness of the culture and climate to stand in his way. It has been difficult to get him to take time off and rest! On his final day in Cambridge he was extremely positive about every aspect of his time here. He was very pleased to have had the opportunity to meet readers and was very grateful to everybody who had helped and encouraged him during his stay.


Tyndale Fellowship conferenceOver 120 scholars attended the Tyndale Fellowship conference, held at High Leigh Conference Centre this summer. The theme was ‘Marriage, Family and Relationships’. Each study group held six sessions, with plenary lectures including:

  • The Old Testament Lecture: ‘The Patricentric Vision of Family Order in the Book of Deuteronomy’ (Dr Daniel I. Block)
  • The Philosophy of Religion Lecture: ‘Marriage and the State: Cut the connection’ (Dr Daniel Hill)
  • The Ethics and Social Theology Lecture: ‘Does English law need “marriage”?’ (Professor Julian Rivers)
  • Special lecture: ‘Scars Across Humanity’ (Dr Elaine Storkey)

 

marriagefamilyrelationships20161


These are examples of the many ways in which we here at Tyndale House are seeking to support and foster high level biblical scholarship in service of the church. Churches, seminaries and universities across the world need people who are intellectually and spiritually equipped to provide the most informed Christian teaching and education.

Will you help the next generation of biblical scholars by praying for us and supporting us financially? If you are outside the UK, your support is particularly powerful at this time when the Pound Sterling is so low.

With warmest regards,

Peter Williams