J.B. Mayor’s Commentary on the Epistle of James

The first page of James in Minuscule 319, a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament.

The first page of James in Minuscule 319, a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament. Source: Wikipedia

James Bickersteth Mayor’s commentary is generally recognised as one of the finest works on the epistle of James of all time. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Joseph Bickersteth Mayor [1828-1916], The Epistle of James. The Greek Text with Introduction and Comments, 2nd edition. London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd. / New York: The Macmillan Company, 1897. Hbk. pp.cclx +256. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Addenda Et Corrigenda
  1. The Author
  2. External For the Authenticity of the Epistle
  3. Relation of the Epistle to Earlier Writings
  4. Relation of the Epistle to the Other Books of the New Testament
  5. The Contents of the Epistle
  6. Persons to Whom the Epistle is Addressed and Place From Which it is Written
  7. On the Date of the Epistle / Harnack and Spitta on the Date of the Epistle
  8. On the Grammar of St James
  9. On the Style of St. James
  10. Did St. James Write in Greek or in Aramaic?
  11. Bibliography
  12. Apparatus Criticus
  • Text of St James
  • Notes
  • Paraphrase and Comments
  • Index

Preface To The First Edition

In writing my Preface I bring to a close a work which has for some years been my chief occupation, and which has indeed been seldom out of my thoughts since the time when, as an undergraduate, I first made acquaintance with Coleridge’s Aids to Reflection, and was led in consequence to study with some care the Epistle of St. James, to which reference is made in the earlier Aphorisms of that book.

In the Introduction I have stated my reasons for believing this Epistle to be the earliest of the books of the New Testament, written probably in the fifth decade of the Christian era by one who had been brought up with Jesus from his childhood and whose teaching is in many points identical with the actual words of our Lord as recorded in the Synoptic Gospels. If I am not mistaken, it presents to its a picture of pre-Pauline Christianity, which is not only interesting historically, but is likely to be of special value in an age of religious doubt and anxiety like the present…

Page vii.

Commentary on Paul’s Letter to the Philippians by J.B. Lightfoot

J.B. Lightfoot’s commentary on Philippians has been continuously in print for 146 years – surely proof of its enduring value for Bible students.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Joseph Barber Lightfoot [1828-1889], Saint Paul’s Epistle to the Philippians. A revised text with introduction, Notes and Dissertations. London & Cambridge: Macmillan & Co. Ltd., 1873. Hbk. pp.346. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Introduction:

  1. St Paul in Rome
  2. Order of the Epistles of Captivity
  3. The Church of Philippi
  4. Character and Contents of the Epistles; The Genuineness of the Epistle

Text and Notes

Dissertations

  1. The Christian Ministry
  2. St Paul; and Seneca; The Letters of Paul and Seneca

Index

St Paul in Rome

The arrival of St Paul in the metropolis marks. a new and important epoch in the history of the Christian. Church. Hitherto he had come in contact with Roman institutions modified by local circumstances and administered by subordinate officers in the outlying provinces of the Empire. Now he was in the very centre and focus of Roman influence; and from this time forward neither the policy of the government nor the character of the reigning prince was altogether a matter of indifference to the welfare of Christianity. . The change of scene had brought with it a change in the mutual relations between the Gospel and the Empire. They were now occupying the same ground, and a collision· was inevitable. Up to this time the Apostle had found rather an ally than an enemy in a power which he had more than once successfully invoked against the malignity of his fellow-countrymen.

Book of Judges with Introduction and Notes by Charles Fox Burney

Maop of Central Palestine from C.F> Burney, The Book of Judges

This is Charles Fox Burney’s 1918 commentary on the book of Judges, complete with colour maps and greyscale plates. This title is in the public domain.

Charles Fox Burney [1868-1925], editor, The Book of Judges with Introduction and Notes. London: Rivingtons. 1918. Hbk. pp.528. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Addenda
  • Principle Abbreviations Employed
  • Introduction
    1. Title, Scope, and Place in the Canon
    2. Structure
    3. The Old Narratives
    4. The Editors
    5. Chronology
    6. External Information Bearing on the Period of Judges
    7. The Permanent Religious Value of Judges
    8. The Hebrew Text and Ancient Versions
  • Translation and Commentary
  • Additional Notes
    • External Evidence for the Use of the Terms ‘Cana’an’ and ‘The Land of the Amorite’
    • Sedek as a Divine Name
    • The Meaning of the Name Kiriath-Arba’
    • The Conquest of the Negeb
    • The Original Form of J’s Account of the Settlement of the Tribes of Israel in Cana’an
    • A Detailed Examination of the Rhythm of the Song of Deborah
    • The Climactic Parallelism of the Song of Deborah
    • The Language of the Song of Deborah
    • Yahweh or Yahu Originally an Amorite Deity
    • Early Identification of Yahweh with the Moon-God
    • The Use of Writing Among the Israelites at the Time of the Judges
    • Human Sacrifice Among the Israelites
    • The Women’s Festival of Judges 11:40
    • The Mythical Elements in the Story of Samson
    • The Origin of the Levites
  • Description of the Plates
  • Note on the Maps of Palestine
  • Indices:-
    1. General Index
    2. Index of Grammatical and Philological Observations
    3. Index of Foreign Terms: Hebrew (Including Cana’anite); Babylonian and Assyrian (Including Sumerian); Aramaic (Including Syriac); Arabic; Greek, Latin
    4. Index of Passages from Other Books Discussed
  • Maps:-
    • Western Asia in the Second Millennium B.C.
    • The District Round Gibe’ah
    • Palestine (five maps)
  • Plates