C.J. Cadoux, The Historic Mission of Jesus

Cecil John Cadoux was Vice-Principal of Mansfield College Oxford and MacKennal Professor of Church History. He is remembered for his numerous books on pacifism. His brother was Arthur Temple Cadoux, the author of The Sources of the Second Gospel, which as the book I was looking for when I came across this one. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain work available for digitisation.

Cecil John Cadoux [1883-1947], The Historic Mission of Jesus. A Constructive Re-Examination of the Eschatological Teaching in the Synoptic Gospels. London & Redhill: Lutterworth Press, 1941. Hbk. pp.376. [Click here to visit the download page for this public domain title]

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Part 1: The Bringer of the Kingdom of God
    1. The Son of God
    2. The Loving and Intimate Servant of God
    3. The Friend of Sufferers and Sinners
    4. The Messiah of Israel
    5. The Conqueror of Satan
    6. The Rightful Lord of Men
    7. The Son of David
    8. The Son of Man
  • Part 2: The Nature and Presence of the Kingdom of God
    1. The Meaning of “The Kingdom of God”
    2. The New Way of Life
    3. The Kingdom Already Present
    4. The Kingdom for the Jews
    5. The Kingdom for the Gentiles
    6. The Political Significance of the Kingdom
    7. The Priceless Value of the Kingdom
  • Part 3: The Future of the Kingdom as First Envisaged
    1. Jesus’ Initial Expectations of Success
    2. The Future Coming of the Kingdom
    3. Rewards and Punishments in General
    4. Rewards and Punishments in the Life After Death
    5. Rewards and Punishments in the Coming Age
  • Part 4: The Future of the Kingdom as Last Envisaged
    1. The Cross Foreseen, Accepted, and Explained
    2. The Roman Invasion and Conquest
    3. The Return of the Son of Man
    4. The Disciples in the Interval
    5. The Consummation
  • Conclusion
  • Indices

Synopsis

In this book the author has aimed at presenting in systematic form the whole of the Synoptic evidence bearing on our Lord’s conception of the Kingdom of God and of his own mission in relation to it. For this purpose he has utilized Dr. Streeter’s important theories regarding the Gospel-documents.

Not only is the entire evidence presented, but its significance is fully discussed; and an attempt is made to show the interconnectedness of its several parts. Furthermore, the author advances one or two theories which–while not in the strict sense new–have never yet been generally accepted or fully utilized for the purpose of bringing out the real meaning and inward consistency of Jesus’ mission. Thus he emphasises (1) the nation-wide character of his appeal, (2) his concern for the redemption of the Gentiles through Israel’s fulfilment of the universalistic aspirations of the Old Testament, (3) his eager endeavour to avert a military clash between the Jews and the Roman Empire, and (4) his early expectation of being accepted and loyally followed by his fellow-countrymen as a whole.

His eschatological views are recognised as playing a real part in his general world-view; but reasons are given for rejecting the thorough-going interpretation urged by Schweitzer. On the other hand, the author finds himself unable to accept on its entirety the recently-broached theory of “released eschatology.” He pleads that the general coherence of the findings to which his study of the evidence leads him constitutes a very strong confirmation of their soundness.

The Synoptic material in handled frankly on its own merits as historical evidence, the author being convinced that untrammelled historical investigation and construction is an absolutely indispensible prerequisite for any really satifying doctrinal speculations.

From the back cover of the dustjacket.

Should you wish to purchase a hard copy of the new edition of this title, one is available from my friends at James Clarke Lutterworth Press.

Westminster Commentaries: Job by Edgar Gibson

Edgar Charles Sumner Gibson [1848-1924], The Book of Job with Introduction and Notes. Westminister Commentaries, 3rd edn., 1919.

The Westminster Commentaries series was intended to be exegetical in nature: more advanced than the Cambridge Bible for Schools, but not as critical as the International Critical Commentary. This volume on Job by Edgar Gibson is still considered to be of some value, according to John F. Evan’s in his Guide to Biblical Commentaries [p.157]. I have added the series to my list to digitise and will add more volumes as I get access to them.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Edgar Charles Sumner Gibson [1848-1924], The Book of Job with Introduction and Notes. Westminister Commentaries, 3rd edn., 1919. London: Methuen & Co. Ltd., 1899. Hbk. pp.236. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Prefatory Note
  • Introduction
    1. The place of the book in the Canon
    2. The contents, structure, and main divisions of the book
    3. The object and character of the book
    4. The date of the book
    5. The integrity of the book
    6. Versions
    7. Commentaries
  • Commentary
  • Index

The Object and Character of the Book

The fact that the book is written in poetry, and that its character is so beautifully symmetrical, the well-ordered arrangement of the speeches, their length and artistic character, show at once that we are not dealing with literal history. Even in the prose narrative of the prologue and epilogue there are indications that it is a work of art rather than an exact record of historical facts with which we are concerned. The symmetrical character of Job’s fourfold trial has often been noticed. The exact reward meted out to him at the close, the number of his flocks and herds being literally doubled, and the precise number of children born to him after his trial equalling those whom he had lost in it-all these features point to the same conclusion. The work as a whole is a poem, and is meant to be regarded as such. There may of course be some historical basis, but, to put it at the very lowest, the same license and freedom in dealing with his materials must be granted to the author of Job that is conceded to other poets treating of historical situations. How much literal history may lie at the basis of the narrative does not really greatly concern us. That Job was a historical character is probable from the allusion to him in Ezekiel xiv. 14, ‘Though these three men, Noah, Daniel, and Job, were in it, they should deliver but their own souls by their righteousness, saith the Lord God,’ and had the narrative been entirely created for the sake of the lessons it was intended to convey, we should have expected the names of the dramatis personae to be significant, and tell us something of their character or position; whereas it is difficult to attach importance to any of them, and even in the case of Job himself, the hero of the story, it is doubtful whether the name is intended to be especially appropriate, or descriptive of his position (see the note on i. 1). The probability, then, is that there was some ancient traditional story of which Job was the hero, which the writer the basis of his poem, and made the vehicle of conveying to the minds of his contemporaries the religious lessons which he desired to impress upon them. It was probably written (see below, § IV.) in an age when troubles and calamities were falling thick upon the people, and the old doctrine of retribution was felt to be breaking down. In early days men were content with the simple view that suffering was in all cases the punishment of sin, and that long life and happiness were invariably the reward of virtue.

Pages xii-xiii.

New Testament for Schools – St Luke – A.R. Witham

Arthur Richard Witham [1863-1930], The Gospel According to Luke. The New Testament For Schools

The New Testament for Schools, St Luke, provides a very basic introduction and commentary on the text of the Revised Version.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation. I hope make more of this series available in due course.

Arthur Richard Witham [1863-1930], The Gospel According to Luke. The New Testament For Schools. London: Rivingtons, 1922. Hbk. pp.248. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Prefatory note
  • St Luke and His Gospel
  • Palestine and its People
  • Messianic Prophecies
  • Synopsis of St Luke’s Gospel
  • Text of St. Luke in the Revised Version, With Notes
  • Index

St Luke and His Gospel

The Third of the Synoptic Gospels is universally ascribed to St. Luke, the auto.or also of the Acts of the Apostles, and possibly (according to one early conjecture) of the Epistle to the Hebrews. The Greek form of his name, Lucas, is perhaps a diminutive of the Roman name Lucanus. Our knowledge of him is derived almost entirely from a few allusions in the N.T. and from deductions drawn from these.

St. Paul in Colossians iv. 14 (written at Rome during his first imprisonment about A.D. 59 or 60) speaks of Luke as one of those with him who send greetings. His name comes after those who are described as being “of the circumcision,” i.e. Jews by birth, from which we gather that Luke was a Gentile. St. Paul calls him “the beloved physician,” and there are frequent traces in the Gospel and the Acts of Luke’s medical interest and knowledge, and his use of correct medical terminology. In the companion epistle, to Philemon, Luke is again mentioned as “a fellow-worker.” And in St. Paul’s last Epistle, 2 Timothy (iv. 11), Luke appears as the only one of his friends who had remained faithful during the great apostle’s second imprisonment: “only Luke is with me.” From St. Luke’s introduction to the Gospel (see notes, i. 1-4) it is gathered that he had not personally been a follower of Jesus Christ, but had received the faith from others, who had been eyewitnesses. Possibly St. Paul him- self had been the instrument of St. Luke’s conversion, but this is not very probable. But both Scriptures and tradition shew him as the close friend and fellow-worker of St. Paul for many years.

In the record of St. Paul’s travels in the Acts, it is gathered from certain passages where “we” is used instead of “they “; that he joined the apostle at Troas in the course of the second missionary journey (Acts xvi. 10); and again accompanied him to Jerusalem (Acts xx. 6-xxi. 18) and also to Rome, in his voyage and shipwreck and his final arrival (Acts xxvii.xxviii. 16). The use of “we” on the second journey stops at Philippi, and is resumed from that place, on the journey to Jerusalem, from which it seems probable that St. Luke had been left in charge of the newly-founded Church of the Philippians, where he remained for some six years. He has been by many identified with the unnamed “brother whose praise in the Gospel is spread through all the churches” (2 Cor. viii. 18). Possibly also it is he whom St. Paul addresses as “true yokefellow” in writing to the Philippian Church (Phil. iv. 3)…

Pages ix-x