Evangelical Quarterly Volume 86 (2014) on-line

Evangelical Quarterly Volume 86 (2014) front cover

BiblicalStudies.org.uk provides the on-line archive for The Evangelical Quarterly, subject to the permission of the authors, who usually hold the rights to these articles. There is a five year delay between publication and the articles appearing in the archive. Most of the material from Volume 86 (2014) is now available for free download. It contains a good variety of subject matter: from the trinity to hermeneutics; early church history to eschatology, and so should provide something of interest to most readers.

My thanks to the authors who have granted permission for their articles to be hosted here. More may appear later, so be sure to visit the main Evangelical Quarterly archive for updates and the download links.

Table of Contents

86.1

John Wilks, “Editorial,”: 3-5.

Fred Sanders, “Redefining Progress in Trinitarian Theology: Stephen R. Holmes on the Trinity,”: 6-20.

Jason Radcliff, “T.F. Torrance in the light of Stephen Holmes’s Critique of Contemporary Trinitarian Thought,”: 21-38.

Jon Mackenzie, “A Double-Headed Luther? A Lutheran Response to The Holy Trinity by Stephen R. Holmes,”: 39-54.

Kevin Giles, “A personal response to Stephen R. Holmes,”: 55-62.

John E. Colwell, “A Conversation Overheard: Reflecting on the Trinitarian Grammar of Intimacy and Substance,”: 63-76.

86.2

Bernardo Cho, “Subverting Slavery: Philemon, Onesimus, and Paul’s Gospel of Reconciliation,”: 99-115.

Gregory R. Goswell, “The book of Ruth and the house of David,”: 116-129.

Peter Ensor, “Tertullian and penal substitutionary atonement,”: 130-142.

Andrew Gregory, “Patristic study debunked – or redivivus? A review article,”: 143-155.

86.3

Michael Strickland, “Redaction Criticism on Trial: The Cases of A.B. Bruce and Robert Gundry,” Andrew Gregory, “Patristic study debunked – or redivivus? A review article,”: 195-209.

Benjamin L. Merkle & W. Tyler Krug, “Hermeneutical Challenges for a Premillennial Interpretation of Revelation 20,”: 210-226.

Laurie Guy, “Back to the Future: The Millennium and the Exodus in Revelation 20,”: 227-238.

Nicholas P. Lunn, “‘Let my people go!’ The exodus as Israel’s metaphorical divorce from Egypt,”: 239-251.

86.4

Timothy C. Tennent, “Postmodernity, the Paradigm and the Pre-Eminence of Christ,”: 291-302.

Stanley E. Porter, “The Authority of the Bible as a Hermeneutical Issue,”: 303-324.

Benjamin Sargent, “Biblical hermeneutics and the Zurich Reformation,” Timothy C. Tennent, “Postmodernity, the Paradigm and the Pre-Eminence of Christ,”: 325-342.

Mark Saucy, “Personal Ethics of the New Covenant: How Does the Spirit Change Us?” Evangelical Quarterly 86.4 (Oct. 2014): 343-378.

BETH Conference 2019 Day 4: Regent’s Park College & Angus Library

Regent’s Park College

Today delegates to the BETH Conference were able to visit the library at Regent’s Park College, a permanent private hall of the University of Oxford. The pictures below are of the theology and church history sections in the library.

Angus Library and Archive

Within Regent’s Park College is housed the Angus Library and Archive, which holds over 100,000 books and other items in its collection. These consist of the papers of leading Baptist figures from the 18h Century to today, the archive of the Baptist Missionary Society (BMS), as well as historic Baptist church records and minute books. The librarian was kind enough to put out on display some of the more unusual items from the collection, including a copy of the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493), the diaries of the pioneering female medical missionary Dr Ellen Farrer, one of William Carey’s Journals, a Tyndale New Testament, a first edition of John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress and a necklace made from leopard’s teeth!

BETH Conference 2019 Day 3: Pusey House Library

Pusey House Oxford
Pusey House Oxford

Pusey House was opened in 1884 and is named in memory of Professor Edward Bouverie Pusey, one of the leading members of the Oxford Movement. Pusey bought books that were not in the Bodleian Library. This collection was considered to be very important and so formed the initial library at Pusey House. By all accounts the modern library is a very pleasant place to study.