J.B. Mayor’s Commentary on the Epistle of James

The first page of James in Minuscule 319, a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament.

The first page of James in Minuscule 319, a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament. Source: Wikipedia

James Bickersteth Mayor’s commentary is generally recognised as one of the finest works on the epistle of James of all time. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Joseph Bickersteth Mayor [1828-1916], The Epistle of James. The Greek Text with Introduction and Comments, 2nd edition. London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd. / New York: The Macmillan Company, 1897. Hbk. pp.cclx +256. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Addenda Et Corrigenda
  1. The Author
  2. External For the Authenticity of the Epistle
  3. Relation of the Epistle to Earlier Writings
  4. Relation of the Epistle to the Other Books of the New Testament
  5. The Contents of the Epistle
  6. Persons to Whom the Epistle is Addressed and Place From Which it is Written
  7. On the Date of the Epistle / Harnack and Spitta on the Date of the Epistle
  8. On the Grammar of St James
  9. On the Style of St. James
  10. Did St. James Write in Greek or in Aramaic?
  11. Bibliography
  12. Apparatus Criticus
  • Text of St James
  • Notes
  • Paraphrase and Comments
  • Index

Preface To The First Edition

In writing my Preface I bring to a close a work which has for some years been my chief occupation, and which has indeed been seldom out of my thoughts since the time when, as an undergraduate, I first made acquaintance with Coleridge’s Aids to Reflection, and was led in consequence to study with some care the Epistle of St. James, to which reference is made in the earlier Aphorisms of that book.

In the Introduction I have stated my reasons for believing this Epistle to be the earliest of the books of the New Testament, written probably in the fifth decade of the Christian era by one who had been brought up with Jesus from his childhood and whose teaching is in many points identical with the actual words of our Lord as recorded in the Synoptic Gospels. If I am not mistaken, it presents to its a picture of pre-Pauline Christianity, which is not only interesting historically, but is likely to be of special value in an age of religious doubt and anxiety like the present…

Page vii.

Commentary on Paul’s Letter to the Philippians by J.B. Lightfoot

J.B. Lightfoot’s commentary on Philippians has been continuously in print for 146 years – surely proof of its enduring value for Bible students.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Joseph Barber Lightfoot [1828-1889], Saint Paul’s Epistle to the Philippians. A revised text with introduction, Notes and Dissertations. London & Cambridge: Macmillan & Co. Ltd., 1873. Hbk. pp.346. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Introduction:

  1. St Paul in Rome
  2. Order of the Epistles of Captivity
  3. The Church of Philippi
  4. Character and Contents of the Epistles; The Genuineness of the Epistle

Text and Notes

Dissertations

  1. The Christian Ministry
  2. St Paul; and Seneca; The Letters of Paul and Seneca

Index

St Paul in Rome

The arrival of St Paul in the metropolis marks. a new and important epoch in the history of the Christian. Church. Hitherto he had come in contact with Roman institutions modified by local circumstances and administered by subordinate officers in the outlying provinces of the Empire. Now he was in the very centre and focus of Roman influence; and from this time forward neither the policy of the government nor the character of the reigning prince was altogether a matter of indifference to the welfare of Christianity. . The change of scene had brought with it a change in the mutual relations between the Gospel and the Empire. They were now occupying the same ground, and a collision· was inevitable. Up to this time the Apostle had found rather an ally than an enemy in a power which he had more than once successfully invoked against the malignity of his fellow-countrymen.

Commentary on 2 Peter and Jude by E.H. Plumptre

Edward Hayes Plumptre [1821-1891], St. Peter & St. Jude with Notes and IntroductionEdward Hayes Plumptre was Dean of Wells Cathedral. Wikipedia notes, Plumptre:

…wrote much on the interpretation of scripture, endeavouring to combine and popularise, in no superficial fashion, the results attained by labourers in special sections of the subject. He contributed to the commentaries known respectively as the Cambridge Bible, the Speaker’s Commentary, that edited by Bishop Ellicott, and the Bible Educator. He also wrote Biblical Studies, 1870 (3rd edit. 1885), St. Paul in Asia (1877), a Popular Exposition of the Epistles to the Seven Churches (1877 and 1879), Movements in Religious Thought: Romanism, Protestantism, Agnosticism (1879), and Theology and Life (1884). His most remarkable theological work was The Spirits in Prison, and other studies on Life after Death (1884 and 1885). The book comprises a review of previous teaching on the subject of eschatology. His characteristic sympathy with ‘the larger hope’ is moderated throughout by a characteristic caution. He had passed beyond the influence of Maurice, and, though his loyal admiration for his earlier teacher remained unchanged, he had rejected his conclusions.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Edward Hayes Plumptre [1821-1891], St. Peter & St. Jude with Notes and Introduction. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1893. Hbk pp.220. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
  3. Index

Introduction. The Training of the Disciple

The early years of the Apostle whose writings are now before us appear to have been passed in the village of Bethsaida (=Fishtown, or more literally Home of Fish), on the West coast of the Sea of Galilee, not far from Chorazin and Capernaum (John i. 44). Its exact position cannot be determined with any certainty, but it has been identified with the modern ‘Ain et Tabi’galt, and must be distinguished from the town of the same name on the North-Eastern shore of the Lake, which, after it had been enlarged and rebuilt by Philip the Tetrarch, was known as Bethsaida Julias, the latter name having been 1 given to it in honour of the daughter of the Emperor Augustus.

Among the fishermen from whose occupation the town derived its name was one who bore the name either of Jona (John i. 42; Matt. xvi. 17) or Joannes (in the best MSS. of John xxi. 15-17)…