Bishop Westcott’s Commentary on Hebrews

Brooke Foss Westcott [1825-1901], The Epistle to the Hebrews: The Greek Text with Notes and Essays, 3rd edn

This is a detailed commentary on the Greek text of the letter to the Hebrews and those with good Greek with benefit from it most. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

Brooke Foss Westcott [1825-1901], The Epistle to the Hebrews: The Greek Text with Notes and Essays, 3rd edn. London: MacMillan & Co. Ltd. / New York: The Macmillan Company, 1903. Hbk. pp.506. [Click to visit the Hebrews page for the link to this title and for those to other commentaries and theological articles]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
    1. Text
    2. Title
    3. Position
    4. Original Language
    5. Destination
    6. Date
    7. Place of Writing
    8. Style and Language
    9. Plan
    10. Characteristics
    11. History and Authorship
    12. The Epistle to the Hebrews and the Epistle of Barnabas
  • Text and Notes
  • The Use of the O.T. in the Epistle
  • Index

Theology of the Letter to the Hebrews by George Milligan

George Milligan [1860-1934], The Theology of the Epistle to the Hebrews with a Critical IntroductionThe fact that George Milligan’s book on the theology of Hebrews is still being reprinted 119 years after it was published is a good indicator of its enduring value to Bible students.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

George Milligan [1860-1934], The Theology of the Epistle to the Hebrews with a Critical Introduction. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1899. Hbk. pp.233. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  1. The History and Authorship of the Epistle
  2. Internal Evidence as to Authorship
  3. The Destination, Date, and Place of Writing of the Epistle
  4. The Readers, Aim, Characteristics, and Analysis of the Epistle
  5. The Covenant-Idea and the Person of the Son
  6. The Son as High Priest
  7. The High-Priestly Work of the Son
  8. The New Covenant
  9. The Relation of the Epistle to Other Systems of Thought
  10. The Present-Day Significance of the Epistle
  • Indexes

Preface

The increasing interest that is being taken in the Epistle to the Hebrews, and the ever-deepening feeling of its vital relation to some of the most pressing questions of our own time, must be pleaded in justification of the addition of another to the many books that have recently appeared dealing with it. And at the same time the author ventures to express the hope that the present volume will be found to fill a place hitherto unoccupied at least by any English writer on the subject. For while there are Critical Commentaries on the Epistle in abundance, and Expositions, both scholarly and popular, dealing with its teaching as a whole, he is not aware of any other book in English presenting that teaching in systematic form. He is painfully conscious how far short his own attempt comes of what such a study in Biblical Theology ought to be….

Commentary on Hebrews by F.W. Farrar

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the HebrewsF.W. Farrar, latterly Dean of Canterbury Cathedral, is probably best known of his Life of Christ (1874). The title is somewhat misleading, being taken from title given to the letter by the KJV and Revised Version. In fact, Farrar argues at length that Apollos, rather than Paul, is the best known authorial candidate (see extract below).

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Hebrews. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1902. Hbk. pp.196. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

I. Introduction.

  1. Character, Analysis, and Object of the Epistle to the Hebrews
  2. Where was the Epistle written? and to whom?
  3. The Date
  4. Style and Character of the Epistle
  5. Theology of the Epistle
  6. The Author of the Epistle
  7. Canonicity

II. Text and Notes

III. Index

Introduction, pp.48-49.

Apollos meets every one of the necessary requirements. (1) He was a Jew. (2) He was a Hellenist. (3) He was an Alexandrian. (4) He was famed for his eloquence and his powerful method of applying Scripture. (5) He was a friend of Timotheus (6) He had ·acquired considerable authority in various Churches. (7) He had been taught b· an Apostle. (8) He was of the School of St Paul; yet (9) he adopted an independent line of his own (1 Cor. iii. 6). (10) We have no trace that he was ever at Jerusalem; and yet, we may add to the above considerations, that his style of argument-like that of the writer of this Epistle was specially effective as addressed to Jewish hearers. The writer’s boldness of tone (Acts xviii. 26) and his modest self-suppression (1 Cor. xvi. 12) also point to Apollos. The various allusions to Apollos are found in Acts xviii. 24-28; 1 Cor. iii. 4-6, xvi. 12; Tit. iii. 13; and in every single particular they agree with such remarkable cogency in indicating to us a Christian whose powers, whose training, whose character, and whose entire circumstances would have marked him out as a man likely to have written such a treatise as the one before us, that we may safely arrive at the conclusion either that AP0LLOS wrote the Epistle or that it is the work of some author who is to us entirely unknown.