Commentary on Matthew by Frank Marshall

Rev. Frank Marshall (left) portrayed in a satirical cartoon
 Rev. Frank Marshall (left) portrayed in a satirical cartoon. Source: Wikipedia

The Reverend Frank Marshall, the British schoolmaster, cleric and rugby administrator, wrote a whole series of commentaries for students preparing for their University entrance examinations (see here for a list). I am planning to make them all available as and when I gain access to printed copies.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing access to this public domain title.

Frank Marshall [1848-1906], The School and College St. Matthew. London: George Gill & Sons, Ltd., [1920]. Hbk. pp.165. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Preface

I. Introduction to the Gospel

  • Title
  • Origin of the Gospels
  • The Author
  • Life of St. Matthew
  • For What Readers
  • Date, Place, and Language
  • Characteristics of the Gospel
  • Peculiarities of St. Matthew’s Gospel
  • Miracles Recorded by St. Matthew
  • Parables Recorded by St. Matthew
  • Kings and Governors
  • Apostles
  • Biographical Notices
  • Geographical Notes
  • The Synagogue
  • The Sanhedrin
  • The Temple
  • Jewish Festivals
  • Sects and Orders of Men
  • The Nazarite Vow
  • The Kingdom of Heaven
  • Teaching of Our Lord
  • Use Of The Old Testament In St. Matthew
  • Demoniacal Possession
  • Titles of Our Lord
  • Testimony Borne to Our Lord
  • Ministry of Our Lord
  • Siege of Jerusalem

The Gospel According To St. Matthew, With Marginal And Foot Notes

Important Changes in the Revised Version, with Comments

Glossary of Words and Phrases Maps. Palestine in the Time of Our Lord

  • The Temple
  • Galilee
  • The Sea of Galilee
  • Jerusalem
  • Environs of Jerusalem
  • Sketch Map of Palestine (for reproduction)

 

 

Commentary on the Gospel of Luke by F.W. Farrar

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Gospel According to Luke with Maps, Notes and IntroductionThis is another of the Cambridge Bible for Schools series, a commentary on the Gospel of Luke by F.W. Farrar. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Gospel According to Luke with Maps, Notes and Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1888. Hbk. pp.392. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

I. Introduction

  1. The Gospels
  2. Life of St John
  3. Authenticity of the Gospel
  4. Characteristics of the Gospel
  5. Analysis of the Gospel; Chief Uncial MSS. of the Gospels; The Herods

II. Text and Notes

III. Excursus I-VII

IV. Index

Introduction, Chapter 1

The word Gospel is the Saxon translation of the Greek Euangelion. In early Greek (e.g. in Homer) this word meant the reward given to one who brought good tidings. In Attic Greek it also meant a sacrifice for good tidings but was always used in the plural euangelia. In later Greek, as in Plutarch and Lucian, euangeli’on meant the good news actually delivered. Among all Greek-speaking Christians the word was naturally adopted to describe the best and gladdest tidings ever delivered to the human race, the good news of the Kingdom of God. In the address of the Angel to the shepherds we find the words “I bring you good tidings of great joy,” where the verb used is euangelizomai. From this Greek word are derived the French Evangile, the Italian Evangelio, the Portuguese Evangelio, &c. Naturally the word which signified “good news” soon came to be used as the title of the books which contained the history of that good news….

Open Source Commentary Survey – October Update

Open Access Commentary SurveyThere are currently six volunteers working on the Open Source Commentary Survey – a big “thank you” to those who have agreed to take part so far. See here to see which books still need to be surveyed. Tyndale House library have very kindly supplied me with a copy of their commentary catalogue in XML format. This will enable me to work out which commentaries are in the the Public Domain with a fair degree of accuracy. In return I will be supplying them with a copy of my list.

A number of people have suggested that I download commentaries already digitised on-line and use them. I did some work this week to see if this would be possible. Below is a screenshot of C.F. Burney’s commentary on Judges.

To me this well below the standard that I would want to use. The page colour is uneven and makes the text difficult to read. I experimented extracting the images, which removes the shadows and the colour-cast, but the resulting text is very pale and, again, difficult to read.

Fortunately I have access to commentaries through Book Aid locally and can order what they don’t have elsewhere, provided that the cost is reasonable. I will consider crowd-funding this if the cost becomes too great.

Open Source Commentary Survey - October Update 1