Is There a Structure in Luke’s Travel Narrative? by Tan Geok Hock

As those who regularly visit my websites will know I am very keen to promote not just theological material produced in the West, but contributions to biblical scholarship from all over the globe. For this reason I host a number of journals published in the Majority World (e.g. Indian Journal of Theology, Melanesian Journal of Theology, etc.). I therefore wanted to mention a book published in Kindle-format which is a summary of a Master’s Thesis written by a Malaysian scholar, Tan Geok Hock, entitled Is There a Structure in Luke’s Travel Narrative?
 
This work would prove of interest to anyone studying Luke or the aspects of the Synoptic Problem that it touches upon. The author argues that the material in the travel narrative section of Luke’s Gospel is arranged thematically, rather than chronologically, into three blocks each with its own distinct theme. Viewed from this perspective the author seeks to provide solutions for a number of historical problems with traditional interpretations of the narrative. The thesis also has implications for the emphasis Luke places on the city of Jerusalem, for discipleship and suffering for one’s faith.

Although the text is not free, the research it contains is certainly worth much more than the small amount that Amazon are charging for it. As far as I am aware it is rare for a higher level thesis from the Majority World to be made widely available and such an opportunity for “cross-pollination” of Western and Eastern scholarship is surely to be encouraged. It would be wonderful to see more such material becoming available.
To purchase and download a copy of the e-book please use the Amazon links below.

New Book on the Theology of Amos by John Barton

John Barton, The Theology of the Book of Amos. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Pbk. ISBN-13: 9780521671750. pp.215.

The publisher’s blurb says:

In modern times Amos has come to be considered one of the most important prophets, mainly for his uncompromising message about social justice. This book provides a detailed exploration of this theme and other important elements of the theology underlying the book of Amos. It also includes chapters on the text itself, providing a critical assessment of how the book came to be, the original message of Amos and his circle, which parts of the book may have been added by later scribes, and the finished form of the book. The author also considers the book’s reception in ancient and modern times by interpreters as varied as rabbis, the Church Fathers, the Reformers and liberation theologians. Throughout, the focus is on how to read the book of Amos holistically to understand the organic development of the prophet’s message through the many stages of the book’s development and interpretation.

Table of Contents:
General editors’ preface
Preface
1. Amos: the critical issues
2. Religious belief and practice in Amos’s day
3. The theology of Amos and his circle
4. Theological theme in the additions to the book of Amos
5. The theology of the book of Amos
6. The reception of the theology of Amos
7. The theology of Amos then and now.
Features:
• Provides an up-to-date survey of theories about the writing and theology of the book of Amos
• Discusses social justice in the prophets and links to Liberation Theology
• Reflects current interest in reading the ‘final form’ of biblical books