“New Commentary on Genesis” by Franz Delitzsch

Franz Delitzsch [1813-1890
Franz Delitzsch [1813-1890
This commentary on Genesis is not to be confused with the joint work with C.F. Keil and is still considered a valuable resource for Bible students. Several people had suggested making use of material that is already available on-line rather than scanning books myself. I thought I had found a good quality scan of this two-volume set, but soon found that the text required centering, cleaning up, and – in one place – repairing. Overall, I doubt if scanning a hard copy would have taken any less time.

Franz Delitzsch [1813-1890], A New Commentary on Genesis, Vol. 1. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1888. Hbk. pp.412. [Click to visit the download page]

Franz Delitzsch [1813-1890], A New Commentary on Genesis, Vol. 2. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1889. Hbk. pp.408. [Click to visit the download page]

Introduction

Criticism at present fixes the date of the main bulk of the Pentateuch, the so-called Priest Codex, together with the Law of Holiness, which has so striking a relation to Ezekiel, at the time of the captivity and the restoration under Ezra and Nehemiah. The Book of Deuteronomy however presupposes the primary legislation contained in Ex. xix.-xxiv. and the work of the Jehovistic historian. Hence we cannot avoid relegating the origin of certain component parts of the Pentateuch to the middle ages of the kings; and, if we continue our critical analysis, we find ourselves constrained to go back still farther, perhaps even to the times of the Judges, and thus to tread the soil of a hoar antiquity without incurring the verdict of lack of scientific knowledge. Even those who insist upon transferring the conception of the account of the creation in Gen. i 1-ii. 4, and of the primaeval histories…

B.W. Newton & Dr. S.P. Tregelles, Teachers of Faith and the Future

Samuel Prideaux Tregelles (30 January 1813 – 24 April 1875)Samuel Prideaux Tregelles (1813 – 1875) is best known today for his critical Greek text of the New Testament. This book provides a summary of his life and work and that of his colleague, B.W. Newton.

F.F. Bruce writes in the Foreword:

I am glad for several reasons to commend the memoir which Mr. Fromow has prepared of B. W. Newton and S. P. Tregelles. One reason is that, as Mr. Fromow has mentioned, some of the material has appeared in The Evangelical Quarterly during my editorship of that periodical.

Another reason is that the name of S. P. Tregelles is one that must always be held in grateful honour by Biblical students for the great work which he did last century on the text of the New Testament. His Greek New Testament is his legacy and monument, and there is no need to enlarge here upon its character and worth. But it is unlikely that Tregelles would ever have begun this work but for the influence which B. W. Newton exercised upon him in his early days; and when at a later date Tregelles was prevented by paralysis from continuing and completing his work, it was Newton who undertook the responsibility of seeing the concluding part through the press. Newton thus merits a share in the gratitude which the world of Biblical learning owes to Tregelles….

My thanks to The Sovereign Grace Advent Testimony for their kind permission to place this book on-line. This title may be downloaded and used for free educational purposes, but not sold for profit without written permission from the copyright holder.

George H. Fromow, ed., B.W. Newton and Dr. S.P. Tregelles. Teachers of the Faith and the Future. The Life and Works of B.W. Newton & Dr. S.P. Tregelles. Taunton: The Phoenix Press, n.d. Hbk. pp.174. [Click here to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. B. W. Newton’s Call by Grace
  2. Newton’s Life and Career
  3. How He Learned Prophetic Truth
  4. Testimonies to His Character and Work
  5. Samuel Prideaux Tregelles, LL.D., Life and Letters
  6. Evangelists in Welsh
  7. Tregelles Greek New Testament
  8. Christians Influenced by their Writings
  9. A Page from Church History
  10. A Statement of Doctrinal Belief
  11. Propositions for Christian Consideration
  12. Extracts from the Teachings of Tregelles
  13. Dr. Tregelles as a Hymn Writer
  14. The Eternal Sonship and the Suretyship of Christ
  15. Principles for the Reading of Scripture
  16. Matthew’s Gospel is Characteristically Christian
  17. Thoughts on Romans Chapters 1 : 2 and 3
  18. The Church in the Epistle to the Ephesians
  19. Imputed Righteousness
  20. Christ, the Church and the Nations
  21. The Renewal of the Near East
  22. Newton’s Forecasts Up-To-Date
  23. Revelation Chapter 13 and the Pope
  24. Some Revised Translations
  25. The Goal of Godless Governments
  26. Daniel’s Visions Illustrated

Appendices

  • Mr. Newton’s Prayers
  • A Statement and Acknowledgment
  • A Humble Letter
  • Books
  • The Sovereign Grace Advent Testimony Manifesto
  • Indices

Commentary on Psalms 1-41 by A.F. Kirkpatrick

Alexander Francis Kirkpatrick [1849-1940], ed., The Book of Psalms with Introduction and Notes. Books I. Psalms I-XLIThis is the first part of the Rev A.F. Kirkpatrick’s Commentary on Psalms in the Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges series.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Alexander Francis Kirkpatrick [1849-1940.], ed., The Book of Psalms with Introduction and Notes. Books I. Psalms I-XLI. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1892. Hbk. pp.227. pdf [This material is in the Public Domain]

Table of Contents

Preface by the General Editor J.J.S. Perowne, D.D.

I. Introduction:

  1. The Book of Psalms
  2. The Position, Names, Numbering, and Divisions of the Psalter
  3. The Titles of the Psalms
  4. The Authorship and Age of the Psalms
  5. The Collection and Growth of the Psalter
  6. The Form of Hebrew Poetry
  7. The Hebrew Text, the Ancient Versions, and the English Versions
  8. The Messianic Hope
  9. On some points in the Theology of the Psalms

II. Text and Notes

III. Appendices

Index

Chapter 1

Lyric poetry is the most ancient kind of poetry, and Hebrew poetry is mainly lyric. Neither epic nor dramatic poetry flourished in ancient Israel. Some indeed of the historical Psalms may be said to have an epic colouring, but they belong to the class of didactic narrative: Job and the Song of Songs may be called in a sense dramatic, but they do not appear to have been intended for performance on the stage. The only independent branch of poetry in Israel was Gnomic or Proverbial poetry, which in the hands of the ‘Wise Men’ attained to a rich development, and must have exercised an important influence on the education of the people.

The Old Testament is the religious history of Israel, and the poetry preserved in the Book of Psalms is, as might be expected, religious poetry. Secular poetry no doubt existed, but it has not come down to us….