Book of Judges with Introduction and Notes by Charles Fox Burney

Maop of Central Palestine from C.F> Burney, The Book of Judges

This is Charles Fox Burney’s 1918 commentary on the book of Judges, complete with colour maps and greyscale plates. This title is in the public domain.

Charles Fox Burney [1868-1925], editor, The Book of Judges with Introduction and Notes. London: Rivingtons. 1918. Hbk. pp.528. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Addenda
  • Principle Abbreviations Employed
  • Introduction
    1. Title, Scope, and Place in the Canon
    2. Structure
    3. The Old Narratives
    4. The Editors
    5. Chronology
    6. External Information Bearing on the Period of Judges
    7. The Permanent Religious Value of Judges
    8. The Hebrew Text and Ancient Versions
  • Translation and Commentary
  • Additional Notes
    • External Evidence for the Use of the Terms ‘Cana’an’ and ‘The Land of the Amorite’
    • Sedek as a Divine Name
    • The Meaning of the Name Kiriath-Arba’
    • The Conquest of the Negeb
    • The Original Form of J’s Account of the Settlement of the Tribes of Israel in Cana’an
    • A Detailed Examination of the Rhythm of the Song of Deborah
    • The Climactic Parallelism of the Song of Deborah
    • The Language of the Song of Deborah
    • Yahweh or Yahu Originally an Amorite Deity
    • Early Identification of Yahweh with the Moon-God
    • The Use of Writing Among the Israelites at the Time of the Judges
    • Human Sacrifice Among the Israelites
    • The Women’s Festival of Judges 11:40
    • The Mythical Elements in the Story of Samson
    • The Origin of the Levites
  • Description of the Plates
  • Note on the Maps of Palestine
  • Indices:-
    1. General Index
    2. Index of Grammatical and Philological Observations
    3. Index of Foreign Terms: Hebrew (Including Cana’anite); Babylonian and Assyrian (Including Sumerian); Aramaic (Including Syriac); Arabic; Greek, Latin
    4. Index of Passages from Other Books Discussed
  • Maps:-
    • Western Asia in the Second Millennium B.C.
    • The District Round Gibe’ah
    • Palestine (five maps)
  • Plates

Daniel in the Critics Den by Sir Robert Anderson

Daniel in the Lions' Den by Briton Rivière (1890)Sir Robert Anderson [1841-1918] was an Assistant Commissioner of the London Metropolitan Police and member of the Open Brethren. In 1885 he wrote this response to F.W. Farrar, then the Dean of Canterbury, who had recently written a commentary on the Book of Daniel in The Expositor’s Bible series. Farrar roundly dismissed the historical claims of that book, so Anderson countered with this defence of a 7th Century dating of Daniel.

This title has been widely republished both in print and on-line, but as I came across a copy at Book Aid I thought it would do not harm to make is available here as well. My thanks to Book Aid for their assistance.

Robert Anderson [1841-1918], Daniel in the Critics’ Den. A Reply to Dean Farrar’s ‘Book of Daniel. Edinburgh & London: William Blackwood & Sons, 1895. Hbk. pp.126. [Click to visit the download page]

Chapter 1

Bv “all people of discernment” the “Higher Criticism” is now held in the greatest repute. And discernment is a quality for which the dullest of men are keen to claim credit. It may safely be assumed that not one person in a score of those who eagerly disclaim belief in the visions of Daniel has ever seriously considered the question. The literature upon the subject is but dull reading at best, and the inquiry demands a combination of qualities which is comparatively rare. A newspaper review of some ponderous treatise, or a frothy discourse by some popular preacher, will satisfy most men. The German literature upon the controversy they know nothing of, and the writings of scholars like Professor Driver of Oxford are by no means to their taste, and probably beyond their capacity. Dean Farrar’s Book of Daniel will therefore supply a much – felt want…

More resources on Daniel can be found here. Of these Alan R. Millard’s recent defence of the book’s historicity is especially helpful.

Notes on the Hebrew Text of the Book of Kings by C.F. Burney

Solomon greeting the Queen of Sheba – gate of Florence Baptistry. Source: Wikipedia

Rev. Charles Fox Burney [1868–1925] was a lecturer in Hebrew at the University of Oxford, becoming Oriel Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture in 1914. This work is effectively a commentary on the Hebrew text of the Books of 1 & 2 Kings.

I had thought, once again, that I would save time by using an on-line text, but on closer examination the one I had chosen had missing and blurred pages and took extra work to correct.

Charles Fox Burney [1868-1925], Notes on the Hebrew Text of the Book of Kings with an Introduction and Notes. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1903. Hbk. pp.384. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Introduction

  1. Structure of Kings
  2. Characteristics of the Chief Ancient Versions of Kings
  3. The Synchrinisms of the Compiler

List of Abbreviations

Notes on 1 Kings

Notes on 2 Kings

Appendix:

  1. Inscription of Mesha’, King of Moab
  2. The Siloam Inscription
  3. Inscription of the Monolith of Shalmanezer II, II. 78-102
  4. Fragment of the Annals of Shalmeneser II. Descriptive Inscription from the Obleish of Shalmanser
  5. Narrative of Sennacherib’s Third Campaign (B.C. 701) from the Taylor Cylinder, Col. II. I. 34-Col. III.I.41

Additions

Index

Introduction: The Structure of Kings

The fact that Kings, like the other historical books of the Old Testament, is based upon pre-existing written sources is universally recognized; and the evidence upon which this elementary proposition is based need not here be set forth. That the main editor or compiler of these sources was a Deuteronomist, i.e. that his work was inspired by the religious revival which took place in the eighteenth year of Josiah (B.C. 621) under the influence of the newly discovered book of Deuteronomy, appears both from his religious standpoint and from his phraseology. This editor is therefore hereinafter cited under the symbol RD (Deuteronomic Redactor).

To RD is due the stereotyped form into which the introduction and conclusion of a reign is thrown, and which constitutes, as it were, the framework upon which the narrative as a whole is built. The regularity of the method of RO in the construction of this framework is worthy of special notice.