Free Online Biblical Training Courses

Over the last few months I have been interacting with hundreds of Christians in Africa through Facebook. What has become clear is that there is a real thirst to get further training in theology in order to be more effective in ministry. While Theology on the Web can support such training by providing free access to thousands of theological articles, commentaries and other books – it is an online library – and therefore does not offer any courses that visitors can follow.

In response to these requests for biblical training courses I have been searching the Internet for suitable material. After looking at their material carefully I have decided to recommend BiblicalTraining.org to my visitors. This non-profit organisation is headed by Dr Bill Mounce and offers free access to a superb collection of courses taught by world-class theologians, which can be downloaded and shared with others. The courses are divided into three levels:

  1. Foundations: Classes that are appropriate for all followers of Jesus. When you begin, they do not assume you know anything about the Bible, and they will teach you basic Bible content and beliefs.
  2. Academy: The university-level classes will take you deeper than Foundations but not assume you want to be taking graduate-level classes
  3. Institute: These seminary-level classes can fully prepare you with the biblical and theological training you need to be an informed leader in your church

Institute Level Courses

Here is a list of BiblicalTraining.org’s current Institute and other related courses:

I am currently greatly enjoying working my way through Craig Keener’s course on Acts, distilled from his recent 4,000 page commentary on that book. The BiblicalTraining.org site requires you to register in order to download the courses, but is completely free. I will shortly be adding direct links to relevant courses on my websites.

Do you know of any good Bible training courses? Feel free to share them in the comments.

Commentary on Romans by David Brown

David Brown [1803-1897], The Epistle to the Romans with Introduction and Notes

David Brown’s commentary on Romans is part of the handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students series. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

David Brown [1803-1897], The Epistle to the Romans with Introduction and Notes. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1950. Hbk. pp.152. [Click to visit the Romans page for the download link for this title and other free resources]

Table of Contents

Introduction

  1. Authenticity of the Epistle
  2. The Traing of the Writer
  3. When and Where this Epistle was Written
  4. Origin of the Roman Church
  5. Was the Roman Church a Jewish or a Gentle Church
  6. The Plan and Character of this Epistle
  • Address and Salutation
  • Theme of the Epistle
  • Salvation needed alike by all, and first, by the whole gentile world
  • The Jew under condemnation no less than the gentile
  • Jewish objections answered
  • The doctrine of justification by faith illustrated from the Old Testament
  • The blessedness of the justified
  • Comparison and contrast between Adam and Christ in their relation to the human family
  • The fruits of justification in the new life
  • The completedness of them that are in Christ Jesus stretching over all time into eternity
  • The true Israel has not been rejected—How Israel after the flesh has has fallen—and how, in the case of both, and in the calling of the Gentiles, the word of God has taken effect
  • The ultimate infringing of all israel to form, with the Gentiles, one kingdom of God on the earth
  • Christian service
  • Political and Social Relations
  • Christian Forbearance
  • Conclusion

International Critical Commentary on Romans

William Sanday [1843-1920] & Arthur Cayley Headlam [1862-1947], A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans

William Sanday and Arthur Headlam’s Commentary on Romans is often recommended as being one of the best in the International Critical Commentary old series. Even if you have the replacement by C.E.B. Cranfield, this one is still worth referring to. This title entered the public domain in 2018.

William Sanday [1843-1920] & Arthur Cayley Headlam [1862-1947], A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans. The International Critical Commentary, 5th Edn. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1908. Hbk. pp.450.

Click here to visit the Romans page for the link to this commentary and other free material.

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
    § 1. Romans in A.D. 58
    § 2. The Jews in Rome
    § 3. The Roman Church
    § 4. Time and Place, Occasion and Purpose
    § 5. Argument
    § 6. Language and Style
    § 7. Text
    § 8. Literary History
    § 9. Integrity
    § 10. Commentaries
  • Commentary
  • Detached Notes
    The Theological Terminology of Rom. i. 1-7
    The word dikaios and its cognates
    The Meaning of Faith in the New Testament and in some Jewish Writings
    The Righteousness of God
    St. Paul’s Description of the Condition of the Heathen World.
    Use of the Book of Wisdom in Chapter i 5
    The Death of Christ considered as a Sacrifice
    The History of Abraham as treated by St. Paul and by St. James
    Jewish Teaching on Circumcision
    The Place of the Resurrection of Christ in the teaching of St. Paul
    Is the Society or the Individual the proper object of Justification?
    The Idea of Reconciliation or Atonement
    The Effects of Adam’s Fall in Jewish Theology
    St. Paul’s Conception of Sin and of the Fall
    History of the Interpretation of the Pauline doctrine of dikaiosis
    The Doctrine of Mystical Union with Christ
    The Inward Conflict
    St. Paul’s View of the Law
    The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit
    The Renovation of Nature
    The Privileges of Israel
    The Punctuation of Rom. ix. 5
    The Divine Election
    The Divine Sovereignty in the Old Testament
    The Power and Rights of God as Creator
    The Relation of St. Paul’s Argument in chap. ix to the Book of Wisdom
    A History of the Interpretation of Rom. ix. 6-29
    The Argument of ix. 30-x. 21: Human Responsibility
    St. Paul’s Use of the Old Testament
    The Doctrine of the Remnant
    The Merits of the Fathers
    The Argument of Romans ix-xi
    St. Paul’s Philosophy of History
    The Salvation of the Individual: Free-Will and Predestination
    Spiritual Gifts
    The Church and the Civil Power
    The History of the word agape
    The Christian Teaching on Love
    The early Christian belief in the nearness of the parousia
    The relation of Chapters xii-xiv to the Gospels
    What sect or party is referred to in Rom. xiv?
    Aquila and Priscilla
  • Index
    • Subjects
    • Latin Words
    • Greek Words