International Critical Commentary on Romans

William Sanday [1843-1920] & Arthur Cayley Headlam [1862-1947], A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans

William Sanday and Arthur Headlam’s Commentary on Romans is often recommended as being one of the best in the International Critical Commentary old series. Even if you have the replacement by C.E.B. Cranfield, this one is still worth referring to. This title entered the public domain in 2018.

William Sanday [1843-1920] & Arthur Cayley Headlam [1862-1947], A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans. The International Critical Commentary, 5th Edn. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1908. Hbk. pp.450.

Click here to visit the Romans page for the link to this commentary and other free material.

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
    § 1. Romans in A.D. 58
    § 2. The Jews in Rome
    § 3. The Roman Church
    § 4. Time and Place, Occasion and Purpose
    § 5. Argument
    § 6. Language and Style
    § 7. Text
    § 8. Literary History
    § 9. Integrity
    § 10. Commentaries
  • Commentary
  • Detached Notes
    The Theological Terminology of Rom. i. 1-7
    The word dikaios and its cognates
    The Meaning of Faith in the New Testament and in some Jewish Writings
    The Righteousness of God
    St. Paul’s Description of the Condition of the Heathen World.
    Use of the Book of Wisdom in Chapter i 5
    The Death of Christ considered as a Sacrifice
    The History of Abraham as treated by St. Paul and by St. James
    Jewish Teaching on Circumcision
    The Place of the Resurrection of Christ in the teaching of St. Paul
    Is the Society or the Individual the proper object of Justification?
    The Idea of Reconciliation or Atonement
    The Effects of Adam’s Fall in Jewish Theology
    St. Paul’s Conception of Sin and of the Fall
    History of the Interpretation of the Pauline doctrine of dikaiosis
    The Doctrine of Mystical Union with Christ
    The Inward Conflict
    St. Paul’s View of the Law
    The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit
    The Renovation of Nature
    The Privileges of Israel
    The Punctuation of Rom. ix. 5
    The Divine Election
    The Divine Sovereignty in the Old Testament
    The Power and Rights of God as Creator
    The Relation of St. Paul’s Argument in chap. ix to the Book of Wisdom
    A History of the Interpretation of Rom. ix. 6-29
    The Argument of ix. 30-x. 21: Human Responsibility
    St. Paul’s Use of the Old Testament
    The Doctrine of the Remnant
    The Merits of the Fathers
    The Argument of Romans ix-xi
    St. Paul’s Philosophy of History
    The Salvation of the Individual: Free-Will and Predestination
    Spiritual Gifts
    The Church and the Civil Power
    The History of the word agape
    The Christian Teaching on Love
    The early Christian belief in the nearness of the parousia
    The relation of Chapters xii-xiv to the Gospels
    What sect or party is referred to in Rom. xiv?
    Aquila and Priscilla
  • Index
    • Subjects
    • Latin Words
    • Greek Words

Commentary on Epistles of Timothy and Titus by A.E. Humphreys

Alfred Edward Humphreys [1844-?], The Epistles of Timothy and Titus

This is a short commentary on the letters of 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus intended for use in Schools and Colleges. The author argues strongly for Pauline authorship in what appears to be a very useful introduction.

My thanks to Book Aid for making available a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Alfred Edward Humphreys [1844-?], The Epistles of Timothy and Titus. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1897. Hbk. pp.271. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
    1. The Genuineness and Date of the Epistles
    2. The Friends Addressed in the Epistles
    3. The Theme and Content of the Epistles
  3. Appendix
  4. Indices
    Map

External Evidence

There was never any doubt in the Church, from the first century down to the present, but that St Paul was the author of these epistles. The rejection by Marcion, as has been well pointed out, increases the force of this testimony, as it shews that attention was expressly called to the subject. And Marcion’s, Canon of Scripture was fixed not by the evidence of authenticity, but by his own approval of the contents, of any book.

The attack made in the present century upon the genuineness of the epistles relies upon arguments drawn from their internal characteristics. In estimating the weight to be attached to these arguments it is of importance to be first sufficiently impressed by the strength of the external evidence. Instead therefore of dismissing this side of the question in a sentence, it is well to place in view the different groups of testimonies down to the acknowledged position given to the epistles by the Church in Canon and Council.

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Greek Text Commentary on 1 & 2 Thessalsonians by George Milligan

Greek Text Commentary on 1 & 2 Thessalsonians by George Milligan 1

If you have a good grasp of New Testament Greek, George Milligan’s commentary on Paul’s letters to the Thessalonians will be of interest to you.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

George Milligan [1860-1934], St Pauls Epistles to the Thessalonians. The Greek text with Introduction and Notes. London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., 1908. pp.195. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

  • The City of Thessalonica
  • St. Paul and the Thessalonian Church
  • General Character and Contents of the Epistles
  • Langauge, Style, and Literary Affinities
  • Doctrine
  • Authenticity and Integrity
  • Authorities for the Text
  • Commentaries

Text and Notes

Analysis of 1 Thessalonians

  • Text and Notes of 1 Thessalonians
  • Analysis of 2 Thessalonians
  • Text and Notes of 2 Thessalonians

Additional Notes

  • St. Paul as a Letter-Writer
  • Did St Paul use the Epistolary Plural?
  • The Thessalonian Friends of St Paul
  • The Divine Names in the Epistles
  • On the history of euangelion, euangelizomai
  • Parousia. Epithaneia. Apokaluphis
  • On atakteo and its cognates
  • On the meanings of katexo
  • The Biblical Doctrine of Antischrist
  • The history of the interpretation of 2 Thess. ii. 1-12

Indexes

Subjects

Authors

References

  1. Inscriptions and Papyri
    (a) Inscriptions
    (b) Papyri
  2. Judaistic Writings

Greek Words

Preface

The Epistles to the Thessalonians can hardly be said to have received at the hands of English scholars the attention they deserve, in view not only of their own intrinsic interest, but of the place which they occupy in the Sacred Canon. They are generally believed to be the earliest of St Paul’s extant Epistles, and, if so, are, in all probability, the oldest Christian documents of importance that have come down to us. Certainly no other of the Pauline writings give us a clearer idea of the character of the Apostle’s missionary preaching, or present a more living picture of the surroundings of the primitive Christian Church. A detailed study of their contents is essential, therefore, to· a proper understanding of the Apostolic Age, and forms the best introduction to the more developed interpretation of Christian thought, which we are accustomed to describe as Paulinism.

p.vii.