Commentary on the Johannine Epistles by Johann Ebrard

Johann Heinrich August Ebrard [1822-1903], Biblical Commentary on the Epistles of St. John

I have been unable to find further information about this commentary on the Greek text of the Johannine Epistles or its author Johann Ebrard. It is not mentioned in any of the commentary surveys I have to hand (Carson, Evans or Rosscup), so if anyone can provide any background information, please do so in the comments.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain work available for digitisation.

Johann Heinrich August Ebrard [1822-1903], Biblical Commentary on the Epistles of St. John in Continuation of the Work of Olshausen with an Appendix on the Catholic Epistles. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1890. Hbk. pp.423. [Click hereto visit the download page]

Contents

  • St John the Apostle and his Writings
  • The First Epistle of John. Introduction
    1. The Epistolary Form
    2. Identity of Author and Evangelist
    3. Genuineness of Epistle
    4. Its Relation to the Gospel
    5. Time and Place of Composition, and Circle of Readers
    6. Diction and Spirit of the Epistle
    7. Literature
  • Exposition
  • The Second and Third Epistles of John
    1. Introduction
    2. Exposition of the Second Epistle
  • The Third Epistle of John. Exposition
  • Translation of the Two Epistles
  • Appendix on the Catholic Epistles
  • Index
    1. Greek Words and Phrases Explained
    2. Passages of Scripture incidentally Explained or Illustrated
    3. Principal Matters

St John the Apostle and His Writings

St John occupies a place so peculiar and prominent, among the disciples of our Lord as a person, and among – the New-Testament writers as an author – and the writings which bear his name have always been the object of such various and conflicting discussion-that a comprehensive exhibition of his personal character, his life, his labours, and his literary activity may well be regarded as one of the most difficult undertakings. If, in the brief limits here prescribed to us, we are to succeed, we must enter upon the subject not analytically, but synthetically; that is, we must set out with the collective picture of the Apostle and his writings given in the New Testament, and then pass on to a general view of all the critical questions arising out of it. The personality of the Apostle himself, and the character of his writings, and their adjustment in the extant cycle of New-Testament literature, must first of all be viewed as a thesis; and upon that we may found a universal review of the critical questions which have been raised in relation to those writings.

Three of our Lord’s Apostles stand out prominently from the general circle: St John, St Peter, and St Paul. The last was not in the number of the Twelve. Among them St James, the son of Zebedee and brother of St John, had been singled out by Christ to be the companion of St John and St Peter in the special distinction of witnessing His transfiguration and His deepest humiliation (Mark v. 37; Matt. xvii. 1, xxvi. 37); but St James soon followed his Master in a death of martyrdom (Acts xii. 2), and on that account is less known to us than the rest.

As compared with St Peter, St John exhibits to us a calm and reflective nature, with a preeminent receptivity: every word of his beloved Master, which tends to solve to his heart the mystery which he pondered, he apprehends in his deepest soul, and holds it fast, and meditates upon it, blessedly losing himself in the contemplation of the glory of the Son of Man.

Pages v-vi.

Brooke Foss Westcott’s Commentary on the Epistles of John

Brooke Foss Westcott [1825-1901], The Epistles of John. The Greek Text with Notes and Essays, 2nd edn.

This is the fourth of Bishop Westcott’s commentaries that I have been able to digitise. You can find the full list here. My thanks to Book Aid for making this public domain title for digitisation.

Brooke Foss Westcott [1825-1901], The Epistles of John. The Greek Text with Notes and Essays, 2nd edn. Cambridge & London: Macmillan & Co. Ltd., 1886. Hbk. pp.378. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Introduction to the First Epistle
  • Introduction to the Second and Third Epistles
  • First Epistle: Text and Notes
  • Second Epistle: Text and Notes
  • Third Epistle: Text and Notes
  1. The Two Empires: The Church and the World
  2. The Gospel of Creation
  3. The Relation of Christianity to Art

Preface

In the present Commentary I have endeavoured to follow the plan which I sketched in the notes on the Gospel of St John in The Speaker’s Commentary. It formed no part of my design to collect and discuss the conflicting opinions which have been held on the structure of the writings or on the interpretation of separate passages. Such a labour is indeed of the deepest interest and utility; but it appeared to me that I might help the student more by giving the results at which I have arrived, and by indicating the lines of inquiry by which they have been reached. In pursuing this end it has been my main desire to call attention to the minutest points of language, construction, order, as serving to illustrate the meaning of St John. I do not venture to pronounce that any variation is trivial or unimportant. The exact words are for us the decisive expression of the Apostle’s thought….

Page v

Commentary on the Epistles of John by Alfred Plummer

Commentary on the Epistles of John by Alfred Plummer 1Alfred Plummer, master of University College Durham, was a prolific writer of biblical commentaries. He wrote the volumes on Luke, 1 Corinthians and 2 Corinthians in the International Critical Commentary (ICC) old series, as well as four of the The Cambridge Bible for Schools series.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of his commentary on John’s letters for digitisation. This volume is in the public domain.

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], The Epistles of John. The Cambridge Bible for Schools. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1892. Hbk. pp.220. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
  3. Appendices
  4. Indices

The Last Years of S. John

A sketch of the life of S. John as a whole has been given in the Introduction to the Fourth Gospel. Here it will not be necessary to do more than retouch and somewhat enlarge what was there said respecting the closing years of his life, in which period, according to all probability, whether derived from direct or indirect evidence, our three Epistles were written. In order to understand the motive and ton,e of the Epistles, it is requisite to have some clear idea of the circumstances, local, moral, and intellectual, in the midst of which they were written.

(i) The Local Surroundings-Ephesus

Unless the whole history of the century which followed upon the destruction of Jerusalem is to be abandoned as chimerical and untrustworthy, we must continue to believe the almost universally accepted statement that S. John spent the last portion of his life in Asia Minor, and chiefly at Ephesus. The sceptical spirit which insists upon the truism that well-attested facts have nevertheless not been demonstrated with all the certainty of a proposition in Euclid, and contends that it is therefore right to doubt them, and lawful to dispute them, renders history impossible. The evidence of S. John’s residence at Ephesus is too , strong to be shaken by conjectures. It will be worth while to state the main elements of it.