Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles by J.P. Lilley

James Philip Lilley [1846-1931], The Pastoral Epistles. Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students

A brief commentary on the pastoral epistles of 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus by the Rev J.P. Lilley. This is part of the Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students series. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

James Philip Lilley [1846-1931], The Pastoral Epistles. Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1901. Hbk. pp. 255. [Click to visit the 1 & 2 Timothy page for the download link for this title and other resources on these letters]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  1. The Pastoral Epistles as a Group
  2. The First Epistle to Timothy
  3. The Epistle of Titus
  4. The Second Epistle to Timothy
  • A Translation of the Pastoral Epistles
  • Commentary
  • Appendix

Commentary on Epistles of Timothy and Titus by A.E. Humphreys

Alfred Edward Humphreys [1844-?], The Epistles of Timothy and Titus

This is a short commentary on the letters of 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus intended for use in Schools and Colleges. The author argues strongly for Pauline authorship in what appears to be a very useful introduction.

My thanks to Book Aid for making available a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Alfred Edward Humphreys [1844-?], The Epistles of Timothy and Titus. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1897. Hbk. pp.271. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
    1. The Genuineness and Date of the Epistles
    2. The Friends Addressed in the Epistles
    3. The Theme and Content of the Epistles
  3. Appendix
  4. Indices
    Map

External Evidence

There was never any doubt in the Church, from the first century down to the present, but that St Paul was the author of these epistles. The rejection by Marcion, as has been well pointed out, increases the force of this testimony, as it shews that attention was expressly called to the subject. And Marcion’s, Canon of Scripture was fixed not by the evidence of authenticity, but by his own approval of the contents, of any book.

The attack made in the present century upon the genuineness of the epistles relies upon arguments drawn from their internal characteristics. In estimating the weight to be attached to these arguments it is of importance to be first sufficiently impressed by the strength of the external evidence. Instead therefore of dismissing this side of the question in a sentence, it is well to place in view the different groups of testimonies down to the acknowledged position given to the epistles by the Church in Canon and Council.

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Charles Ellicott’s Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905]
By Herbert R. Barraud (died 1896), Public Domain Source: Wikipedia.
In order to get the most from Bishop Charles Ellicott’s commentary on the Pastoral Epistles you will need a good grasp of Greek. Despite its age, this commentary still seems to be in demand, so I was very pleased to find one at Book Aid recently. This title is in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], The Pastoral Epistles of St. Paul: With a critical and Grammatical commentary and a revised translation, 3rd edn. London: Longmans, Green Reader & Dyer, 1869. Hbk. pp.263. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the Third Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on 1 Timothy
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on 2 Timothy
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on Titus
  • Translation: The First Epistle to Timothy
  • Translation: The Second Epistle to Timothy
  • Translation: The Epistle to Titus

Introduction

The date and general circumstances under which this and the accompanying Epistles were written have long been the subjects of discussion and controversy.

As our opinion on these points must first be stated, it may be said briefly,-(a) that when we duly consider that close connexion in thought, subject, expressions, and style, which exists between the First Epistle to Timothy and the other two Pastoral Epistles, it seems in the highest degree incredible that they could have been composed at intervals of time widely separated from each other. When we further consider (b) the almost insuperable difficulty in assigning any period for the composition of this group of Epistles in that portion of the Apostle’s life and labours included in the Acts; (c) the equally great or even greater difficulty in harmonizing the notes of time and place in these Epistles with those specified in the Apostle’s journeys as recorded by St Luke…