Baptist Review of Theology now available on-line

I happened to come across a request for two articles from the Baptist Review of Theology on the Association of British Theological and Philosophical Libraries (ABTAPL) list. I contacted Professor Stanley K. Fowler, Academic Dean of Heritage Seminary in Ontario and asked if he would consider allowing me to place the journal on-line. Professor Fowler not only agreed to do so, but kindly provided me with an almost complete set of the journal to scan. The series lacks only issue 3.1 – perhaps someone has a copy that they could loan me to finish the set? You can access the Table of Contents here.

The journal only ran between 1991 and 1998 and contains a number of interesting articles, including one in French by Don Carson.

Transactions of the Baptist Historical Society now online

I was asked last year by Professor John Briggs, Chairman of the Baptist Historical Society, if I could assist them by digitising and hosting the Transactions of the Baptist Historical Society (1908-1921) and the Baptist Quarterly (1922-present). I quickly learned – through my contacts at the Baptist training colleges – that the Transactions represent a unique historical record valuable not just to Baptists, but to church historians, theologians and missiologists across the denominations. These old volumes are currently on restricted access in those few colleges that have paper copies.

The Baptist Quarterly will take me most of this year to complete, but the Transactions of the Baptist Historical Society are now available on-line. To further assist colleges I have provided a link at the top of the page to a compressed archive that contains all the PDF files and a separate table of contents (total file size around 65MB). These can be placed on College servers at no charge as the entire collection is now Public Domain.

Rob Bell and Universalism – some resources

There have been a number of detailed reviews published of Rob Bell’s latest book. Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived (HarperOne, 2011). I do not intend to repeat their contents here, though I think that two are worth mentioning. Kevin DeYoung’s review is the most helpful covering in some detail problems with Bell’s exegesis, understanding of history and eschatology [a pdf version of the review can be found here]. I have to agree strongly with his statement that:

This is a book for people like Bell, people who grew up in an evangelical environment and don’t want to leave it completely, but want to change it, grow up out of it, and transcend it. The emerging church is not an evangelistic strategy. It is the last rung for evangelicals falling off the ladder into liberalism or unbelief.

This brings me the second review by Albert Mohler. Mohler concentrates on the similarities between Bell’s theology and that of Nineteenth Century Liberalism. For Mohler, Bell is simply Schleiermacher redivivus.

Now, to my main purpose in writing. Here are some on-line resources that might be of help. I have extensive bibliographies on both Hell and Universalism. From these these articles might be of most interest:

Graham Keith, “Patristic Views on Hell – Part 1,” The Evangelical Quarterly 71.3 (1999): 217-232.

Graham Keith, “Patristic Views on Hell – Part 2,” The Evangelical Quarterly 71.4 (1999): 291-310.

Richard Bauckham, “Universalism: a historical survey,” Themelios 4.2 (September 1978): 47-54.

Timothy K. Beougher, “Are All Doomed to Be Saved? The Rise of Modern Universalism,” The Southern Baptist Journal of Theology 2.2 (Summer 1998): 6-24.