Website Development Plans for 2015

Theology on thr Web NewsOver the Christmas holiday I have evaluating how best to spend my time on Website development and have decided on the following plans for 2015 (in no particular order):

Plans for 2015

1) Addition of at least one free-to-download commentary on each book of the Bible

Looking at my visitor logs for 2014 I was clear that the most popular downloads were of commentaries. During 2015 I will be trying to find more public domain works that still have value to the biblical exegete and make them available via the website.

2) Digitisation of a Kymer/English Theological Journal

Continuing in my commitment to make international Biblical Scholarship available I am very pleased to announce that I have received permission to digitise Honeycomb – a Kymer-English journal from Cambodia. I am looking forward to making this available – hopefully by Easter.

3) Continuing the digitisation of public domain materials from long-running theological journals

A number of theological journals have been published for so long that much of their older material is now in the public domain. These include:

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library

Journal of Theological Studies (old series)

Journal of the Transactions of the Victoria Institute

Palestine Exploration Quarterly

4) New Public Domain Material

As of 1st January for those publications covered by the “70-year from death of author” copyright term, those works by authors who died during 1944 and before have entered the public domain. I will be therefore working through my sites and making this material available. These include works by:

James Moffatt [1870-1944]

Robert Martin Pope [1865-1944]

Thomas Banks Strong [1861-1944]

Visitor numbers to the websites continue to climb, and are expected to exceed 2 million  this year. I would like to take this opportunity to thank my readers for their ongoing support and encouragement.

Kirkpatrick’s Commentaries on Samuel

Frontispiece map to Kirkpatrick's Commentaries on 1 & 2 SamuelCommentaries on Samuel

The following public domain commentaries on Samuel are now available for free download in PDF. The frontispiece map included in both volumes is very useful, so I have included scans at various resolutions here.

A.F. Kirkpatrick, ed., The First Book of Samuel with Notes and Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1918. Hbk. pp.251.

Table of Contents

I. Introduction:

Chapter I. The Book of Samuel

Chapter II. Analysis of the First Book of Samuel

Chapter III. Chronology of the Book

Chapter IV. The Place of the Books of Samuel in the History of the Kingdom of God

Chapter V. The Life and Work of Samuel

Chapter VI. The Prophetic Order

Chapter VII. Saul

Chapter VIII. David

II. Text and Notes

III. Additional Notes I-VIII

Click here to download entire volume.

A.F. Kirkpatrick, ed., The Second Book of Samuel with Notes and Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1919. Hbk. pp.248.

Table of Contents

I. Introduction:

Chapter I. The Book of Samuel

Chapter II. Analysis of the Second Book of Samuel

Chapter III. The Relation of the Book of Chronicles to the Book of Samuel

Chapter IV. The Chronology of the Book of Samuel

Chapter V. The Place of the Books of Samuel in the History of the Kingdom of God

Chapter VI. The Reign of David

Chapter VII. The Typical Significance of David’s Reign and Life

Chapter VIII. Psalms Illustrative of David’s Reign

II. Text and Notes

III. Additional Notes I-VI

Click here to download entire volume.

Pastoral Epistles Commentary by Simpson

Simpson's Commentary on the Pastoral EpistlesThe following Pastoral Epistles commentary is now available for free download in PDF:

E.K. Simpson, M.A., The Pastoral Epistles. The Greek Text with Introduction and Commentary. London: The Tyndale Press, 1954. Hbk. pp.174.

Due Diligence

This book is still in copyright. I have attempted the following to locate the current copyright holder:

1) Contacted the publisher of the book – no record of current copyright holder.
2) Contacted American publisher of another book by the same author – records out-of-date.
3) Wrote to author’s former College – no reply.
4) Wrote to author’s former church – no reply.
5) Posted a resquest for contact information on-line – no response.
6) Have had other works by this author online for several years and have had no contact from copyright holder.

As these searches have failed, I am posting the book and inviting the copyright holder to get in touch with me.

Pastoral Epistles Commentary

Introduction

I. The Author

The spell cast by Saul of Tarsus over minds of any moral earnestness admits of no question. Unlike his namesake, the first king of Israel, he was shortish of stature. Chrysostom styles him ho tripechus anthropos, and Augustine, playing on his Roman cognomen, paullum modicum quid; but the extent of the shadow he has spread over posterity bears witness to the hulk of his spiritual build. Indeed, his most ardent admirers do not pay him more signal homage in this respect than those detractors from his just fame who ascribe to his influence an age-long perversion of primitive Christianity so entire as to set him at cross purposes with his Master. Such a man’s career throbs with interest to all serious thinkers.

That career, as we all know, bisects itself into two wholly discrepant halves. To explain how the hunting leopard of Pharisaism came to he transformed into one of the Good Shepherd’s most docile lambs has always baffled sceptical ingenuity. The change of front is so utter, and pregnant with such far-reaching issues, that it positively demands the supernatural cause which he himself assigns for it to render the phenomenon intelligible.

But our theme restricts us to those closing days of this marvellous biography about which, strange to say, we know less than about the rest. Whatever he the verdict we pass on the Pastoral Epistles, it cannot be denied that they form a group by themselves, detached from the residue of Paul’s writings and attached to one another by links of their own. Some of the older commentators, in common with Wieseler, a German theologian of the last century, have sought to isolate Titus and the first Epistle to Timothy from its twin brother, and affix on them a date prior to what are known as the ‘Prison Epistles’. They seem to have thought that on any other supposition the apparent references to a revisit of Paul to Ephesus clashed with his declaration in Acts xx to the elders at Miletus that they should ‘see his face no more’. But there are two or three ways of parrying this over-hasty conclusion.

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