Commentary on Psalms 1-41 by A.F. Kirkpatrick

Alexander Francis Kirkpatrick [1849-1940], ed., The Book of Psalms with Introduction and Notes. Books I. Psalms I-XLIThis is the first part of the Rev A.F. Kirkpatrick’s Commentary on Psalms in the Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges series.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Alexander Francis Kirkpatrick [1849-1940.], ed., The Book of Psalms with Introduction and Notes. Books I. Psalms I-XLI. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1892. Hbk. pp.227. pdf [This material is in the Public Domain]

Table of Contents

Preface by the General Editor J.J.S. Perowne, D.D.

I. Introduction:

  1. The Book of Psalms
  2. The Position, Names, Numbering, and Divisions of the Psalter
  3. The Titles of the Psalms
  4. The Authorship and Age of the Psalms
  5. The Collection and Growth of the Psalter
  6. The Form of Hebrew Poetry
  7. The Hebrew Text, the Ancient Versions, and the English Versions
  8. The Messianic Hope
  9. On some points in the Theology of the Psalms

II. Text and Notes

III. Appendices

Index

Chapter 1

Lyric poetry is the most ancient kind of poetry, and Hebrew poetry is mainly lyric. Neither epic nor dramatic poetry flourished in ancient Israel. Some indeed of the historical Psalms may be said to have an epic colouring, but they belong to the class of didactic narrative: Job and the Song of Songs may be called in a sense dramatic, but they do not appear to have been intended for performance on the stage. The only independent branch of poetry in Israel was Gnomic or Proverbial poetry, which in the hands of the ‘Wise Men’ attained to a rich development, and must have exercised an important influence on the education of the people.

The Old Testament is the religious history of Israel, and the poetry preserved in the Book of Psalms is, as might be expected, religious poetry. Secular poetry no doubt existed, but it has not come down to us….

Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology Vol 18 (2019) on-line

Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology Vol 18 (2019) on-line 1

The Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology is hosted on biblicalstudies.org.uk. The editors have just sent me the latest issue to upload.

Volume 18 (2019)

David Corbin, “A Theology of Joy: An Evangelical Response to Carnival in Trinidad & Tobago,” pp.1-10.

Clinton Chisholm, “Are All Religions Alike?” pp.11-24.

Brendan Bain, “The Future is Now,” pp.25-35.

Anthony Chung, “Reflections on Theological Education,” pp.36-38.

Ricardo O’N Sandcroft, “The Buggary Law in Jamaica,” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 18 (2019): 39-48.

D.V. Palmer, “Galatians 5 in Context,” pp.49-64.

Marlene Roper, “Book Review: Living Wisely (by Burchell Taylor),” pp.65-66.

Click here to visit the download page for this journal and view the other available issues.

Benjamin Davidson’s Analytic Hebrew Lexicon

Benjamin Davidson, Analytic Hebrew LexiconOne of the advantages of helping sort donated books at Book Aid is that I can often find suitable material for digitisation. This very damaged copy of Benjamin Davidson’s Analytical Hebrew Lexicon would have gone into the recycling. Instead I have been able to disbind and scan it. This title is in the public domain.

Benjamin Davidson [d.1871], The Analytical Hebrew and Chaldee Lexicon: consisting of an alphabetical arrangement of every word and inflectioncally and contained in the Old Testament scriptures, precisely as they occur in the sacred text, with a grammatical analysis of each word, and lexicographical illustration of the meanings: a complete series of Hebrew and Chaldee paradigms, with grammatical remarks and explanations. London: Samuel Bagster & Sons Ltd., [1850?]. Hbk. pp.874.  [Click here to visit the download page]

Preface

The instruction of a competent living Teacher is doubtless the most efficient means of acquiring any Language. Supplied with such help, the Student requires little more than the subject at heart, attention, and perseverance. And there cannot be said to be any lack of Teachers of the Hebrew Language in England; for, besides the Universities and Colleges with their qualified Tutors, there are numerous private teachers of sufficient ability. Suitable Books too are abundant and accessible.

A practical difficulty, however, remains: Students can rarely secure the advantage of oral instruction long enough to obtain a complete knowledge of Hebrew; and those especially who seek to qualify themselves for the Ministry of the Word of God, too frequently find their College Terms expire without their having attained proficiency: for, unlike the Classics, the Hebrew language is ordinarily taken up during the busiest period of life…