Tyndale House News – April 2017

Tyndale House News

Reproduced by permission of Tyndale House Communications Dept.

The Greek New Testament: Produced at Tyndale House

Dr Dirk Jongkind, Senior Research Fellow in New Testament

We are approaching the end of nearly a decade’s work producing a new edition of the Greek New Testament as the entire finished text has been submitted this month to the publishers, Crossway. This work has been headed up by Dr Dirk Jongkind, Senior Research Fellow in New Testament, who has recently become our Academic Vice Principal. Involving about 30 researchers in different ways, this edition is seeking to present the most accurate ever printing of the New Testament scriptures based on a careful study of scribal habit.

Read more at the start of Dirk’s blog.


Writing Lines: T-S D1.108 and the Song of Moses

Read this fascinating article about a manuscript in the Cairo Genizah. Written by Tyndale House Research Associate Kim Phillips Writing Lines: T-S D1.108 and the Song of Moses has been selected as fragment of the month at Cambridge University Library.


Historical evidence that Jesus lived and died: Guardian Article

Did you miss Dr Simon Gathercole’s article, former Tyndale House reader, during the Easter period? Written in the Guardian’s world news section on Easter Sunday read his article What is the historical evidence that Jesus Christ lived and died?


Book Now For Tyndale Fellowship Conference 2017 – Early Bird Discount Ends Soon (Before 30 April 2017)

Book Now For Tyndale Fellowship Conference 2017

Tyndale House Newsletter – October 2016

Tyndale House October Newsletter

This Tyndale House Newsletter is reproduced here by permission of the Tyndale House Communications Dept.

P. Beatty III (𝔓47): The Codex, Its Scribe, and Its Text

Peter Malik, one of our recently appointed Research Associates

Peter Malik, one of our recently appointed Research Associates, is working on a daily basis on the Codex Climaci Rescriptus. Amidst this work Peter is preparing to publish his Cambridge PhD dissertation successfully completed while at Tyndale House.

Malik investigated the earliest extensive handwritten copy of the Book of Revelation. In P. Beatty III (𝔓47): The Codex, Its Scribe, and Its Text, he applies codicology, palaeography and a knowledge of scribal practice to shed new light on the text.

Due out in 2017 and using the latest developments in digital photography this data-rich publication by Brill will offer, for the first time, high-resolution colour photographs of the manuscript.

‘Where Art Thou, O Hezekiah’s Tunnel?’

Another scholar to bring a fresh look on Biblical scholarship is Dr Mary Hom with her publication in the Journal of Biblical Literature this autumn.

Dr Mary Hom with her publication in the Journal of Biblical Literature this autumn

‘Where Art Thou, O Hezekiah’s Tunnel? A Biblical Scholar Considers the Archaeological and Biblical Evidence concerning the Waterworks in 2 Chronicles 32:3-4, 30 and 2 Kings 20:20’

Journal of Biblical Literature  Vol. 135, No. 3 (Fall 2016), pp. 493-503.

Mary writes: “The increase of Iron Age archaeological discoveries in the City of David in recent years has precipitated debates regarding the identification of the tunnel that Hezekiah built, as described in 2 Chronicles 32:30 (cf. 2 Kings 20:20). The possibility of Channel II instead of Tunnel VIII as the actual conduit that Hezekiah built in response to the approaching Assyrian threat has gained increasing attention among both archaeologists and biblical literary scholars, and new discoveries in the past fifteen years have both answered questions and raised new ones. This article is a rigorous interdisciplinary evaluation of the evidence from both fields, and it may be seen that when the issue of identifying Hezekiah’s tunnel is taken in consideration with an understanding of the biblical text in its ancient Near Eastern literary milieu along with the most reliably expert findings in archaeology, several recent questions may be resolved.”

Scholarship in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Revd Christophe Sadiki of the Anglican Church of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is a land of past troubles, but future potential. Thanks to our International Scholars Programme we were able to welcome the Revd Christophe Sadiki of the Anglican Church of the Congo to Tyndale House for three months over the summer.

Christophe’s dissertation topic is “The Corruption of the Monarchy in Israel with Reference to Deuteronomy 17: 14-20; 1 Samuel 8; 1 and 2 Kings; a Look at the DRC”. He explains: “I think that this topic is pertinent in our African context where corruption is a scourge that is contributing to poverty among our people. It will challenge scholars to think about and interpret the Word of God in a way that speaks to the DRC context. Upon graduation I am planning to join the faculty at the Anglican University of Congo where I will be engaged to train leaders for the Anglican Communion in the Province of the Anglican Church of Congo.”

Christophe has clearly found these months a huge stimulus to his doctoral research and it has opened a new world of enquiry to him. The community at Tyndale House have welcomed him warmly, assisted him in so many ways, practical and academic, and provided a supportive environment for his studies. A mentor allocated to him has been assiduous in his supervision, meeting him weekly and prompting Christophe to take new avenues of thought, and compare different traditions and methods of study.

Christophe himself seems to have made the most of every moment, refusing to allow the newness of the culture and climate to stand in his way. It has been difficult to get him to take time off and rest! On his final day in Cambridge he was extremely positive about every aspect of his time here. He was very pleased to have had the opportunity to meet readers and was very grateful to everybody who had helped and encouraged him during his stay.


Tyndale Fellowship conferenceOver 120 scholars attended the Tyndale Fellowship conference, held at High Leigh Conference Centre this summer. The theme was ‘Marriage, Family and Relationships’. Each study group held six sessions, with plenary lectures including:

  • The Old Testament Lecture: ‘The Patricentric Vision of Family Order in the Book of Deuteronomy’ (Dr Daniel I. Block)
  • The Philosophy of Religion Lecture: ‘Marriage and the State: Cut the connection’ (Dr Daniel Hill)
  • The Ethics and Social Theology Lecture: ‘Does English law need “marriage”?’ (Professor Julian Rivers)
  • Special lecture: ‘Scars Across Humanity’ (Dr Elaine Storkey)

 

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These are examples of the many ways in which we here at Tyndale House are seeking to support and foster high level biblical scholarship in service of the church. Churches, seminaries and universities across the world need people who are intellectually and spiritually equipped to provide the most informed Christian teaching and education.

Will you help the next generation of biblical scholars by praying for us and supporting us financially? If you are outside the UK, your support is particularly powerful at this time when the Pound Sterling is so low.

With warmest regards,

Peter Williams

“The Greek Papyri” by George Milligan

George Milligan [1860-1934]
George Milligan [1860-1934]
The following public domain article is now available in PDF:

George Milligan [1860-1934], “The Greek Papyri – with special reference to their value for New Testament study,” Journal of the Transactions of the Victoria Institute 44 (1912): 62-78.

George Milligan was an noted biblical scholar in his day as this extract from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography makes clear:

It was a notable pioneering achievement for Milligan to issue, while still at Caputh, a standard commentary on St Paul’s epistles to the Thessalonians (1908), in which among other things he applied the new papyrological evidence to a re-examination of the Pauline grammar and vocabulary. He began his great work, The Vocabulary of the Greek Testament (1914–29), in collaboration with J. H. Moulton, and after the issue of part two in 1915 completed it single-handedly. Its comprehensiveness and accuracy provided a foundation for successors to build upon, while remaining readable and full of human interest.

I suspect that this lecture is little-known, but I hope that, like his other works, it will still prove of Interest today.

The Greek Papyri by George Milligan

The most significant fact in the modern study of the New Testament is the recognition that it has a history, and consequently that its several books can only be fully understood in connexion with their surroundings or the special circumstances that called them forth. Everything, therefore, that throws light on the outward conditions of the New Testament writers is of value. And it is just here that we are in a peculiarly favourable position to-day. In the past, archaeological discovery has been mainly concerned with the Old Testament, but now the light it sheds has been extended to the New Testament, and is largely derivable from the immense number of texts on stone, on earthen ware, and on papyrus which recent discoveries have brought within our reach.

It is only with the papyrus texts that we are at present concerned, and for their preservation we have to thank them marvellously dry climate of Egypt. The first finds were made at Gizeh as far back as 1778, but it was not until 1877, when several thousands of papyri were unearthed at Crocodilopolis, or Arsinöe, the ancient capital of the Fayûm district, that public interest was fully aroused. The work of exploration was afterwards extended to Tebtunis, Oxyrhynchus, and other likely sites, with the result that we have now thousands of these texts in our hands. Some were discovered in the ruins of old temples, others in the cartonnage of mummies; but the greater number were found in what were literally the dust or refuse heaps on the outskirts of the towns or villages. The old Egyptians, instead of burning their waste-papers, as is the custom amongst ourselves, were in the habit of tearing them up and throwing them out on these heaps, where, thanks to a covering of desert sand, they have lain in safety all these years.

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