Alan R. Millard on the Historical Accuracy of Daniel

In 2012 Crossway published an impressive collection of 21 essays defending the historical reliability of the Bible under the title Do Historical Matters Matter to Faith? The publishers have kindly granted permission for Theology on the Web to host Alan Millard’s contribution to that volume, dealing with the accuracy of Daniel’s account of Babylon:

Alan R. Millard, “Daniel in Babylon: An Accurate Record?” James K. Hoffmeier & Dennis R. Magary, eds. Do Historical Matters Matter to Faith? A Critical Appraisal of Modern and Postmodern Approaches to Scripture. Crossway, 2012. Pbk. ISBN-13: 978-1433525711. pp.263-280.

You can download a copy in PDF here.

Thomas McCall’s essay on religious epistomology (Chapter 1) is also available here.

Welch’s The Work of the Chronicler (1939) now available on-line

Title page

Professor Adam C. Welch’s 1938 Schweich Lectures of the British Academy (1938) are now available on-line – the work became public domain on 1st January this year:

Adam C. Welch [1864-1943], The Work of the Chronicler: Its Purpose and Its Date. The Schweich Lectures of the British Academy 1938. London: Oxford University Press, 1939. Hbk. 163.

New Book on the Theology of Amos by John Barton

John Barton, The Theology of the Book of Amos. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Pbk. ISBN-13: 9780521671750. pp.215.

The publisher’s blurb says:

In modern times Amos has come to be considered one of the most important prophets, mainly for his uncompromising message about social justice. This book provides a detailed exploration of this theme and other important elements of the theology underlying the book of Amos. It also includes chapters on the text itself, providing a critical assessment of how the book came to be, the original message of Amos and his circle, which parts of the book may have been added by later scribes, and the finished form of the book. The author also considers the book’s reception in ancient and modern times by interpreters as varied as rabbis, the Church Fathers, the Reformers and liberation theologians. Throughout, the focus is on how to read the book of Amos holistically to understand the organic development of the prophet’s message through the many stages of the book’s development and interpretation.

Table of Contents:
General editors’ preface
Preface
1. Amos: the critical issues
2. Religious belief and practice in Amos’s day
3. The theology of Amos and his circle
4. Theological theme in the additions to the book of Amos
5. The theology of the book of Amos
6. The reception of the theology of Amos
7. The theology of Amos then and now.
Features:
• Provides an up-to-date survey of theories about the writing and theology of the book of Amos
• Discusses social justice in the prophets and links to Liberation Theology
• Reflects current interest in reading the ‘final form’ of biblical books