Book of Judges with Introduction and Notes by Charles Fox Burney

Maop of Central Palestine from C.F> Burney, The Book of Judges

This is Charles Fox Burney’s 1918 commentary on the book of Judges, complete with colour maps and greyscale plates. This title is in the public domain.

Charles Fox Burney [1868-1925], editor, The Book of Judges with Introduction and Notes. London: Rivingtons. 1918. Hbk. pp.528. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Addenda
  • Principle Abbreviations Employed
  • Introduction
    1. Title, Scope, and Place in the Canon
    2. Structure
    3. The Old Narratives
    4. The Editors
    5. Chronology
    6. External Information Bearing on the Period of Judges
    7. The Permanent Religious Value of Judges
    8. The Hebrew Text and Ancient Versions
  • Translation and Commentary
  • Additional Notes
    • External Evidence for the Use of the Terms ‘Cana’an’ and ‘The Land of the Amorite’
    • Sedek as a Divine Name
    • The Meaning of the Name Kiriath-Arba’
    • The Conquest of the Negeb
    • The Original Form of J’s Account of the Settlement of the Tribes of Israel in Cana’an
    • A Detailed Examination of the Rhythm of the Song of Deborah
    • The Climactic Parallelism of the Song of Deborah
    • The Language of the Song of Deborah
    • Yahweh or Yahu Originally an Amorite Deity
    • Early Identification of Yahweh with the Moon-God
    • The Use of Writing Among the Israelites at the Time of the Judges
    • Human Sacrifice Among the Israelites
    • The Women’s Festival of Judges 11:40
    • The Mythical Elements in the Story of Samson
    • The Origin of the Levites
  • Description of the Plates
  • Note on the Maps of Palestine
  • Indices:-
    1. General Index
    2. Index of Grammatical and Philological Observations
    3. Index of Foreign Terms: Hebrew (Including Cana’anite); Babylonian and Assyrian (Including Sumerian); Aramaic (Including Syriac); Arabic; Greek, Latin
    4. Index of Passages from Other Books Discussed
  • Maps:-
    • Western Asia in the Second Millennium B.C.
    • The District Round Gibe’ah
    • Palestine (five maps)
  • Plates

Commentary on the Book of Judges by Professor J.J. Lias

John James Lias [1834-1923], The Book of JudgesAccording to WikiSource John James Lias [1834-1923] was Chancellor of Llandaff Cathedral and Hulsean Lecturer in Divinity and Lady Margaret Preacher at the University of Cambridge. This is the full text of his commentary on the Book of Judges. This title is in the public domain.

John James Lias [1834-1923], The Book of Judges, J.J.S. Perowne, gen.ed., The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1884. Hbk. pp.220. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Introduction
    1. Contents, Authorship and Date, Genuineness, Canonicity, of the Book of Judges
    2. The Political, Moral, and Religious condition of Israel under the Judges
    3. The Personal character of the Judges
    4. The Song of Deborah
    5. The Chronology of the Period
    6. Analysis
  2. Texts and Notes
  3. Appendix
  4. Index

Introduction

I. Contents. The book of Judges consists of three parts. The first part (ch. i. 1, iii. 7) forms an Introduction, obviously designed to connect the book with the previous narrative in Joshua. We have first a description of the condition of the Israelites immediately after Joshua’s death, and their relations with the Phoenician peoples whom Joshua had left only half subdued (ch. i. i-ii. 10). Then (ch. ii. ii-iii. 7) the writer proceeds to give a brief summary of his history chiefly from a moral and religious point of view, pointing out the cause of national misfortunes, namely the disobedience of the people to the national law, and their apostasy from the national religion. The second part (ch. iii. 8-xvi. 31) contains the history of the Judges. In the third part (ch. xvii. to end) the historian adds two episodes of a more private and personal character… [Continue reading]