Commentary on James and Jude by Alfred Plummer

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], The General Epistles of St. James and St. Jude

This is the third edition of Alfred Plummer’s commentary on the letters of James and Jude. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], The General Epistles of St. James and St. Jude. The Expositor’s Bible. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1899. Hbk. pp.476. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  1. The Catholic Epistles
  2. The Authenticity of the Epistle of St. James
  3. The Author of the Epistle: James the Brother of the Lord
  4. The Persons Addressed in the Epistle: The Jews of the Diaspora
  5. The Relation of the Epistle to the Writings of St. Paul amd of St. Peter.—The Date of the Epistle—The Doctrine of Joy in Temptation
  6. The Relation of this Epistle to the Books of Ecclesiastes and of the Wisdom of Solomon.—The Value of the Apocrypha, and the Mischief of Neglecting it
  7. The exaltation of the Lowly, and the fading away of the rich.—The metaphors of Str. James and the parables of Christ
  8. The source of temptations, and the reality of sin.—The difficulties of the determinist
  9. The delusion of hearing without doing.—The mirror of God’s word
  10. The Christology of St. James.—The practical unbelief involvged in showing a wordly respect of persons in public worship
  11. The iniquity of respecting the rich and despising the poor.—The solidarity of the divine law
  12. Faith and works: Three views of the relation of the teaching of St. James to the teaching of St. Paul.—The relation of Luther to both
  13. The faith of demons; the faith of Abraham; and the faith of Rehab the Harlot
  14. The heavy responsibilities of teachers.—The powers and propensities of the tongue.—The self-defilement of the reckless talker
  15. The moral contradictions in the reckless talker
  16. The wisdom that is from below
  17. The wisdom that is from above
  18. St. James and Plato on lusts as the cause of strife; Their effect on prayer
  19. The seductions of the world, and the jealousy of the divine love
  20. The power of Satan and its limits.—Humility the foundation of penitence and of holiness
  21. Self-assurance and invasion of divine prerogatives involved in hte love of censuring others
  22. Self-assurance and invasion of divine prerogatives involved in presuming upon our future.—The doctrine of prababilism
  23. The follies and inequalities of the rich; Their miserable end
  24. Patience in waiting.—The Endurance of Job.—The significance of the mention of Job by James
  25. The prohibition of swearing.—The relation of the language of St. James to recorded sayings of Christ
  26. Worship the best outlet and remedy for excitement.—The connexion between worship and conduct
  27. The elders of the church.—The anointing of the sick and extreme unction
  28. The public and private confesson of sins.—The lawfulness of prayers for rain
  29. The work of converting sinners; its conditions and rewards

    The General Epistle of Jude
  30. The authenticity of the epistle of St. Jude
  31. The purpose of the epistle.—The faith once for all delivered and the development of Christian doctrine
  32. The persons denounced in the epistle.—Its relation to 2 Peter
  33. Doubtful readings and the theory of verbal inspiration.—Three palmary instances of divine vengeance upon grevious sin
  34. Railing at dignities.—”The Assumption of Moses.”—St. Jude’s use of apocryphal literature
  35. The description corresponding to Cain. The libertines at the Love-feasts.—The Book of Enoch
  36. The description to Balaam: the impious discontent and greed of the libertines.—The Apostolic warning respecting them
  37. The description corresponding to Korah; Making separations.—Exhortations to the faithful to build up themselves, and then rescue others
  38. The final doxology: praise to God, the protection of his servants
  • Index

Commentary on 2 Peter and Jude by E.H. Plumptre

Edward Hayes Plumptre [1821-1891], St. Peter & St. Jude with Notes and IntroductionEdward Hayes Plumptre was Dean of Wells Cathedral. Wikipedia notes, Plumptre:

…wrote much on the interpretation of scripture, endeavouring to combine and popularise, in no superficial fashion, the results attained by labourers in special sections of the subject. He contributed to the commentaries known respectively as the Cambridge Bible, the Speaker’s Commentary, that edited by Bishop Ellicott, and the Bible Educator. He also wrote Biblical Studies, 1870 (3rd edit. 1885), St. Paul in Asia (1877), a Popular Exposition of the Epistles to the Seven Churches (1877 and 1879), Movements in Religious Thought: Romanism, Protestantism, Agnosticism (1879), and Theology and Life (1884). His most remarkable theological work was The Spirits in Prison, and other studies on Life after Death (1884 and 1885). The book comprises a review of previous teaching on the subject of eschatology. His characteristic sympathy with ‘the larger hope’ is moderated throughout by a characteristic caution. He had passed beyond the influence of Maurice, and, though his loyal admiration for his earlier teacher remained unchanged, he had rejected his conclusions.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Edward Hayes Plumptre [1821-1891], St. Peter & St. Jude with Notes and Introduction. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1893. Hbk pp.220. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
  3. Index

Introduction. The Training of the Disciple

The early years of the Apostle whose writings are now before us appear to have been passed in the village of Bethsaida (=Fishtown, or more literally Home of Fish), on the West coast of the Sea of Galilee, not far from Chorazin and Capernaum (John i. 44). Its exact position cannot be determined with any certainty, but it has been identified with the modern ‘Ain et Tabi’galt, and must be distinguished from the town of the same name on the North-Eastern shore of the Lake, which, after it had been enlarged and rebuilt by Philip the Tetrarch, was known as Bethsaida Julias, the latter name having been 1 given to it in honour of the daughter of the Emperor Augustus.

Among the fishermen from whose occupation the town derived its name was one who bore the name either of Jona (John i. 42; Matt. xvi. 17) or Joannes (in the best MSS. of John xxi. 15-17)…

John Calvin on the Catholic Epistles

John Calvin, author of Commentaries on the Catholic Epistles
John Calvin [1509-1564]
John Calvin’s commentaries on the 1 John, 1 & 2 Peter, James and Jude are now available for free download in PDF:

John Calvin (John Owen translator), Commentaries on the Catholic Epistles. Edinburgh: Calvin Translation Society, 1855. Hbk. pp.488.

Commentaries on the First Epistle of Peter

The Argument

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The design of Peter in this Epistle is to exhort the faithful to a denial of the world and a contempt of it, so that being freed from carnal affections and all earthly hindrances, they might with their whole soul aspire after the celestial kingdom of Christ, that being elevated by hope, supported by patience, and fortified by courage and perseverance, they might overcome all kinds of temptations, and pursue this course and practice throughout life.

Hence at the very beginning he proclaims in express words the grace of God made known to us in Christ; and at the same time he adds, that it is received by faith and possessed by hope, so that the godly might raise up their minds and hearts above the world. Hence he exhorts them to holiness, lest they should render void the price by which they were redeemed, and lest they should suffer the incorruptible seed of the Word, by which they had: been regenerated into eternal life, to be destroyed or to die. And as he had said, that they had been born again by God’s Word, he makes mention of their spiritual infancy. Moreover, that their faith might not vacillate or stagger, because they saw that Christ was despised and rejected almost by the whole world, he reminds them that this was only the fulfilment of what had been written of him, that he would be the stone of stumbling. But he further teaches them that he would be a firm foundation to those who believe in him. Hence he again refers to the great honour to which God had raised them, that they might be animated by the contemplation of their former state, and by the perception of their present benefits, to devote themselves to a godly life.

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