Gospel Perspectives Vol 1 – Your chance to choose an article

The British Library have just supplied me with a copy of Gospel Perspectives, Vols 1: Studies of History and Tradition in the Four Gospels. R.T. France & David Wenham, eds. JSOT Press, 1980. Please vote for your favourite article by 21st December – remember to say why you think it is the best. The article by Rainer Riesner is not included below because it is in German.

F.F. Bruce, “The Trial of Jesus in the Fourth Gospel,” pp.7-20.

Bruce Chilton, “Targumic Transmission and Dominical Tradition,” pp.21-46.

Peter H. Davids, “The Gospels and Jewish Tradition: Twenty Years After Gerhardsson,” pp.75-100.

R.T. France, “Mark and the Teaching of Jesus,” pp.101-137.

Sydney H.T. Page, “The Authenticity of the Ransom Logion (Mark 10:45b),” pp.137-162.

Phillip Barton Payne, “The Authenticity of the Parable of the Sower and its Interpretation,” pp.163-208.

Robert H. Stein, “The ‘Criteria’ For Authenticity,” pp.225-263.

Thanks in advance for your input.

Gospel Perspectives Vols 2, 3 & 5 Poll Results are in

I wanted to thank those who contributed to the poll to select the single article from each volume of Gospel Perspectives Vols. 2, 3 & 5 which I have been given permission from the Publisher to reproduce. It made an extremely difficult job a whole lot easier! Here as promised are the titles of the articles that I have decided to use:

Vol. 2

D.A. Carson, “Historical Tradition in the Fourth Gospel: After Dodd, What?” pp.83-146.

This was the majority opinion and was also the one that I was keen to use. Don Carson has now granted permission for me to go ahead.

Vol. 3

Bruce Chilton, “Varieties and Tendencies of Midrash: Rabbinic Interpretation of Isaiah 24.23” pp.9-32.

This was the most difficult for me to assess as I know little about this area and so I went with Michael Bird’s recommendation because his post indicated that he had read the articles. Permission from the author is still pending.

Vol. 5

Richard Bauckham, “The Study of Gospel Traditions Outside the Canonical Gospels: Problems and Prospects,” 369-404.

This was the majority vote. Richard Bauckham granted permission this morning.

I am expecting volumes 1 and 4 from the British Library shortly and will post a new poll for each as they arrive.

Gospel Perspectives Vol 5 – Your chance to choose an article

Below is the Table of Contents from Gospel Perspectives, Vol 5: The Jesus Tradition Outside the Gospels. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1984. As below, please vote by 15th December. Gerhard Maier’s article is not listed as it is in German.

David Wenham, “Paul’s Use of the Jesus Tradition: Three Samples,” pp.7-38.

Peter Richardson & Peter Gooch, “Logia of Jesus in 1 Corinthians,” pp.39-62.

Peter H. Davids, “James and Jesus,” 63-84.

G.K. Beale, “The Use of Daniel in the Synoptic Eschatological Discourse and in the Book of Revelation,” pp.129-154.

Bruce Chilton, “The Gospel According to Thomas as a Source of Jesus’ Teaching,” pp.155-176.

Craig L. Blomberg, “Tradition and Redaction in the Parables of the Gospel of Thomas,” pp.177-206.

David F. Wright, “Apocryphal Gospels: The ‘Unknown Gospel’ (Pap. Egerton 2) and the Gospel of Peter,” pp.207-232.

Donald A. Hagner, “The Sayings of Jesus in the Apostolic Fathers and Justin Martyr,” pp.233-268.

Jonathan Draper, “The Jesus Traditon in the Didache,” pp.269-288.

Graham H. Twelftree, “Jesus in Jewish Traditions,” pp. 289-342.

Murray J. Harris, “References to Jesus in Early Classical Authors,” pp.343-368.

Richard Bauckham, “The Study of Gospel Traditions Outside the Canonical Gospels: Problems and Prospects,” 369-404.

Gospel Perspectives Vol 2 – Your chance to choose an article

Below are the articles from Gospel Perspectives, Vol. 2: Studies of History and tradition in the Four Gospels. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1981. I can place one of the articles from this list on-line, subject to the author’s permission. As there are so many good articles I am asking for help in deciding which one to use; so if you have a favourite, please add a comment to let me know. I have excluded the article by Gerhard Maier which is in German.

1) Which article you would like to see included
2) Briefly say why.

Please vote by 15th December. I will take all votes and comments into consideration when I decide which one to use.

D.E. Aune, “The Problem of the Genre of the Gospels: A Critique of C.H. Talbert’s What is a Gospel?” pp.9-60.

R.J. Banke, “Setting ‘The Quest for the Hsitorical Jesus’ in a Broader Framework,” pp.61-82.

D.A. Carson, “Historical Tradition in the Fourth Gospel: After Dodd, What?” pp.83-146.

Bruce Chilton, “Announcement in Nazara: An Analysis of Luke 4:16-21″ pp.147-172.

William Lane Craig, “The Empty Tomb of Jesus” pp.173-200.

Stephen C. Farris, “On Discerning Semitic Sources in Luke1-2” pp.201-238.

R.T. France, “Scripture, Tradition and the History of the Infancy Narratives of Matthew” pp.239-266

Grant R. Osborne, “John 21: Test Case for History and Redaction in the Resurrection Narratives,” pp.293-328.

Philip Barton Payne, “The Authenticity of the Parables of Jesus” pp.329-344.

David Wenham, “Paul and the Synoptic Apocalypse” pp.345-375.

Kenneth E. Bailey’s theory of “informal controlled oral tradition” developed further

Of the several hundred books and articles that I have worked on over the last few years there is one that stands out to me:

Kenneth E. Bailey, “Informal Controlled Oral Tradition and the Synoptic Gospels,” Asia Journal of Theology 5 (1991): 34-54. = Themelios 20.2 (1995): 4-11.

Writing with the unique insight into Palestinian culture afforded by 30 years of teaching in the Middle East Bailey’s theory seems to make sense. I was very pleased therefore to read Michael F. Bird’s article “The Formation of the Gospels in the Setting of Early Christianity: the Jesus Tradition as Corporate Memory,” Westminster Theological Journal 67.1 (2005): 113-94. Bird builds on Bailey’s arguments further and suggests that it

…needs to be supplemented with a theory of corporate remembrance,
that is, a theory which characterizes the Gospels as the memory of Jesus
interpreted and applied to the context of the early Christians. The term “Jesus
in corporate memory” is useful as a categorization since it enables one to unify
the diverse elements of bias and biography. What the Gospels produce is not the
Christ of faith superimposed on to the historical Jesus; rather, they offer a
dramatic representation, much like a docu-drama, of Jesus’ actions in the past
and his voice for the present available through the public memory of Jesus.
Consequently, the memory of Jesus deposited in the Gospels bequeaths to us both
authenticity and artistry, fact and faith, history and hermeneutic. The
objective of the Evangelists is not to write a Life of Jesus to satisfy a
positivistic epistemology, but nor is it to offer an image of Jesus concocted
out of thin air to be used as a weapon of intra-Christian or inter-Jewish
polemics. The Gospels intend to narrate a story and to evoke the significance of
the one called Jesus, Israel’s Messiah and the world’s rightful Lord.

The article is well worth reading in full.