John Eadie’s Commentary on Colossians

John Eadie [1810-1876], A Commentary on the Greek Text of the Epistle of Paul to the Colossians, 2nd edn.

This is John Eadie’s commentary on the Greek text of Colossians. This digital copy was scanned from a copy kindly funded by a supporter. This title is in the public domain.

John Eadie [1810-1876], A Commentary on the Greek Text of the Epistle of Paul to the Colossians, 2nd edn. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1884. Hbk. pp.301. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • The Literature of the Epistle
    1. Colosse, Laodicea, and Hierapolis
    2. The Church at Colosse
    3. The Genuineness of the Epistle
    4. The False Teachers at Colosse
    5. Contents of the Epistle
    6. Time and Place of Writing of the Epistle
    7. Works on the Epistle
  • Commentary
  • Index

Westminster Commentary on Colossians and Philemon by Lewis B. Radford

Lewis Bostock Radford [1869-1937], The Epistle to the Colossians and the Epistle to Philemon. Westminister Commentaries

Lewis B. Radford, who was Bishop of Goulburn in New South Wales, was the author of the Westminster Commentary on Paul’s letters to the Colossians and Philemon. This public domain volume was scanned from a the copy in Spurgeon’s College Library.

Lewis Bostock Radford [1869-1937], The Epistle to the Colossians and the Epistle to Philemon. Westminister Commentaries. London: Methuen & Co. Ltd., 1931. Hbk. pp.382. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

The Epsitle to the Colossians

  • Prefatory Note by the General Editor
  • Preface
  • Introduction
    1. The authenticity and integrity of the Epistle
    2. The historical setting of the Epistle
    3. The relation of Colossians to contemporary epistles
    4. Christianity in Phrygia
    5. The Colossian Heresy
    6. Analysis of the Epistle
    7. Angelology and angelolatry
    8. The value of the epistle for modern thought
    9. Theosophy and Christianity
    10. Friends and fellow-workers of St. Paul
  • Text and Commentary
  • Additional Notes
    • The Christology of St. Paul in Col. i. 15-17
    • Christ the Head of the Body
    • The Pleroma
    • Reconciliation and the angels
    • Presentation to God
    • The afflictions of Christ
    • The Christian meaning of mystery
    • The passing of human distinctions
    • Divine election
    • Christian perfection
    • Poetry in Christian worship
    • Married life in St. Paul and St. Peter
    • St. Paul references to his imprisonment
    • The symbolism of salt
    • The Kingdom of God
    • The house-congregation

Epistle to Philemon

  • Introduction
    1. The background and contents of the Epistle
    2. Ancient parallels to the Epistle
    3. Criticism of the Epistle
    4. Christianity and slavery
  • Text and Commentary
  • Bibliography and Abbreviations
  • Index

Commentary on Colossians by S.R. Macphail

Simon Ross Macphail [d.1912], The Epistle of Paul to the Colossians.

A brief commentary on Paul’s letter to the Colossians by Simon Ross Macphail [died 1912] in the Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students series. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Simon Ross Macphail [d.1912], The Epistle of Paul to the Colossians. Handbooks for Bible Classes and Bible Students. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1911. pbk. pp.130. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • Commentary
  • Appendix A. Outline of the Letter
  • Appendix B. Mithraism and Christianity
  • Appendix C. Manumission
  • Appendix D. Colossians and Ephesians
  • Appendix E. Words, etc., Specially Examined

Introduction

When any one proposes to enter on the study of a portion of the New Testament, the first question which arises is, To which division of the New Testament does my present study belong? For there are two leading divisions. The one contains the narrative of our Lord’s earthly ministry (the four Gospels), and the other belongs to a subsequent time of special Revelation, when the Holy Spirit interpreted to the Apostles the full meaning of the Lord’s earthly mission, and also led them, as He had Himself promised, into much new truth. These two portions combined form the New Testament Revelation, and contain all through which the knowledge of grace and glory by Jesus Christ comes to men in every age. The New Testament is final Revelation, but New Testament theology, i.e. man’s grasp of the New Testament, is ever purifying, enlarging, and enriching…

Page 11.