Ramsay’s Cities of St Paul on-line

The Cities of St. Paul by William M. Ramsay
The Cities of St Paul by William M. Ramsay

While I was at Bible College (a long time ago now, or so it seems) I wrote at article about missionary principles in the Book of Acts. As I studied the various Bible Encyclopedia articles on the cities of Acts I was surprised to find how many of them where based on William M. Ramsay’s 1907 work on the subject, which at the that time, had not been superseded. For that reason I am very pleased to be able to make it available free of charge.

William M. Ramsay [1851-1939], The Cities of St Paul. Their Influence on His Life and Thought. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1907. Hbk. pp.452. This title is in the Public Domain

Table of Contents

Part I – Paulinism in the Graeco-Roman World

§ I. Introduction
§ II. The Pauline Philosophy of History
§ III. The Pauline Contrasted with the Method .
§ IV. St Paul and Hellenism
§ V. Hellenism and Hebraism
§ VI. The Empire as the World’s Hope
§ VII. Paulinism in the Roman Empire
§ VIII. Conclusion

PART II – Tarsus

§ I. Introduction
§ II. The Situation of Tarsus
§ III. Tarsus and the Plain of Cilicia
§ IV. Tarsus, the River and the Sea
§ V. Tarsus and the Cilician Gates
§ VI. The Ionians in Early Tarsus
§ VII. Tarsus as an Oriental Town
§ VIII. Legends of Early Tarsus
§ IX. The Religion of Tarsus
§ X. The Revival of Greek Influence
§ XI. Tarsus as the Greek Colony Antiocheia
§ XII. The Greeks in Tarsus-Antiocheia
§ XIII. The Jews in Tarsus 169
§ XIV. The Jews settled in Tarsus in l 7 l B.C.
§ XV. Tarsus the Hellenistic City
§ XVI. Tarsus as Capital of · the Roman Province Cilicia
§ XVII. The Oriental Spirit ‘in Tarsus
§ XVIII. Romans otherwise Tarsians
§ XIX. The Tarsian Democracy
§·XX. Athenodorus of Tarsus
§ XXI. The Reform of the Tarsian Constitution by Athenodorus
§ XXII. The University of Tarsus
§ XXIII. Tarsus under the Empire

Part III – Antioch

§ I. The City and its Foundation
§ II. The Jews in Pisidian Antioch
§ III. The Greek Colonists in Early Antioch
§ IV. The Phrygians of Antioch
§ V. Antioch a City of Galatia
§ VI. Character of the Original Hellenic City
§ VII. The Roman Colony of Pisidian Antioch
§ VIII. Hellenism in Pisidian Antioch
§ IX. The Religion of Antioch
§ X. First Appearance of Paul and Barnabas in the Antiochian Synagogue
§ XL Paul’s First Address to a Galatian Audience
§ XII. The Approach to the Gentiles
§ XIII. The Door of the Gentiles

Part IV – Iconium

§ I. Natural and National Character
§ II. The Religion of Iconium
§III. The Territory of Iconium
§IV. Iconium a City of Galatia
§ V. The Constitution of the Hellenic City Iconium
§VII. Iconium as a Roman City
§VIII. The Roman Colony of Iconium
§IX. St Paul at Iconium
§ x. The Christian Cults of Iconium

Part V – Derbe

Part VI – Lystra

§I. Situation and Character
§II. Character of the Five Cities

Part VII – St Paul in the Roman World

Notes

William M Ramsay’s Pauline Studies online

The complete public domain text of William M Ramsay’s collection of essays – Pauline and Other Studies in Other Studies in Early Christian History – is now available on-line for free download in PDF.

William M Ramsay [1851-1939], Pauline and Other Studies in Early Christian History. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1906. Hbk. pp.415.
Click to download.

There are helpful articles on various aspects of Paul and his personality, on the book of Acts, Ephesus, Early Christian Persecutions and even one on Basil of Caesarea. There us also an excellent map, which I am making available in both 300 dpi and 600 dpi resolutions.

William M Ramsay's Map of the Pauline World

Table of Contents

I. Shall We Hear Evidence or Not?

II. The Charm of Paul

Ill. The Statesmanship of Paul

IV. Pagan Revivalism and the Persecutions of the Early Churchrmat

V. The Worship of the Virgin Mary at Ephesus

VI. The Permanence of Religion at Holy Places in Western Asia

VII.The Acts of the Apostles

VIII. The Lawful Assembly

IX. The Olive-Tree and the Wild-Olive

X. Questions: With a Memory of Dr. Hort

XI. St. Paul’s Road From Cilicia to Iconium

XII. The Authorship of the Acts

XIII. A Study of St. Paul by Mr. Baring-Gould

XIV. The Pauline Chronology

XV. Life In The Days of St. Basil the Great

A Cadbury Selection from JBL

[dropcap]R[/dropcap]ecently I was reading through John Nolland’s commentary on the Gospel of Luke when I came across the following passage.

A number of scholars have attempted to support Lukan authorship on the basis of a claim that the medical background of the author was evident in his writing. The argument takes its rise from the study of Hobart (The Medical Language of St. Luke) published in 1882. Hobart compared the language and style of Luke with that of ancient medical writing in Greek and found many similarities. The argument is not finally persuasive because Hobart focused on the distinctiveness of Luke over against Mark but failed to take any benchmarks from other literature of the period of a nonmedical nature. What distinguishes Luke from Mark is a use of language that is slightly more literary. As Cadbury has demonstrated (The Style and Literary Method of Luke, 50-51; ]BL 52 [1933] 55-65), we may find the same sort of language use in the LXX, in the works of ancient Greek veterinarians, and indeed we should expect to find it in any reasonably large body of literature written by a well-educated Greek writer with some modest literary pretension for what he IS wanting. Luke’s writing is certainly consistent with experience as a physician, but it cannot be claimed that only a physician would write as Luke does.{1}

I found it interesting that Nolland, writing in 1989 cited an article by H.J. Cadbury written in 1933. Reading on I found many other references to articles by Cadbury, which made me think that it might be a good idea to make these articles more widely available. I contacted the Director of SBL Press at the Society of Biblical Literature who was enthusiastic about the idea. The librarians at Tyndale House, Dr. Williams’s Library and Heythrop College also gave their willing assistance in providing photocopies and scans. Thanks to all of them I can now make the complete of collection H.J. Cadbury articles from the Journal of Biblical Literature available for free download in PDF.

H.J. Cadbury Collection

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “The basis of early Christian antimilitarism,” Journal of Biblical Literature 37.1-2 (Mar.-June 1918): 66-94.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “The relative pronouns in Acts and elsewhere,” Journal of Biblical Literature 42.3-4 (1923): 150-157.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Lexical notes on Luke-Acts. I,” Journal of Biblical Literature 44.3-4 (1925): 214-227.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Lexical notes on Luke-Acts. II, Recent arguments for medical language,” Journal of Biblical Literature 45.1-2 (1926): 190-209.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Lexical notes on Luke-Acts. III, Luke’s interest in lodging,” Journal of Biblical Literature 45.3-4 (1926): 305-322.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “The odor of the spirit at Pentecost,” Journal of Biblical Literature 47.3-4 (1928): 237-256.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Lexical notes on Luke-Acts. 4, On direct quotation, with some uses of oti and ei,” Journal of Biblical Literature 48.3-4 (1929): 412-425.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Erastus of Corinth,” Journal of Biblical Literature 50.2 (1931): 42-58.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Lexical notes on Luke-Acts. 5, Luke and the horse-doctors,” Journal of Biblical Literature 52.1 (1933): 55-65.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “The Macellum of Corinth,” Journal of Biblical Literature 53.2 (1934): 134-141.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Motives of biblical scholarship,” Journal of Biblical Literature 56.1 (1937): 1-16.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “The meaning of John 20:23, Matthew 16:19, and Matthew 18:18,” Journal of Biblical Literature 58.3 (1939): 251-254.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “A proper name for Dives,” Journal of Biblical Literature 81.4 (Dec. 1962): 399-402.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Some Lukan expressions of time,” Journal of Biblical Literature 82.3 (Sept. 1963): 272-278.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Gospel study and our image of early Christianity,” Journal of Biblical Literature 83.2 (June 1964): 139-145.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Name for Dives,” Journal of Biblical Literature 84.1 (March 1965): 73.

More articles from the Journal of Biblical Literature can be found here.

{1] John Nolland, “Luke 1-9:20,” Word Biblical Commentary,Vol. 35a. Dallas, TX: Word Books, 1989. pp.xxxvi-xxxvii.