Commentary on Epistles of Timothy and Titus by A.E. Humphreys

Alfred Edward Humphreys [1844-?], The Epistles of Timothy and Titus

This is a short commentary on the letters of 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus intended for use in Schools and Colleges. The author argues strongly for Pauline authorship in what appears to be a very useful introduction.

My thanks to Book Aid for making available a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Alfred Edward Humphreys [1844-?], The Epistles of Timothy and Titus. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1897. Hbk. pp.271. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
    1. The Genuineness and Date of the Epistles
    2. The Friends Addressed in the Epistles
    3. The Theme and Content of the Epistles
  3. Appendix
  4. Indices
    Map

External Evidence

There was never any doubt in the Church, from the first century down to the present, but that St Paul was the author of these epistles. The rejection by Marcion, as has been well pointed out, increases the force of this testimony, as it shews that attention was expressly called to the subject. And Marcion’s, Canon of Scripture was fixed not by the evidence of authenticity, but by his own approval of the contents, of any book.

The attack made in the present century upon the genuineness of the epistles relies upon arguments drawn from their internal characteristics. In estimating the weight to be attached to these arguments it is of importance to be first sufficiently impressed by the strength of the external evidence. Instead therefore of dismissing this side of the question in a sentence, it is well to place in view the different groups of testimonies down to the acknowledged position given to the epistles by the Church in Canon and Council.

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Charles Ellicott’s Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905]
By Herbert R. Barraud (died 1896), Public Domain Source: Wikipedia.
In order to get the most from Bishop Charles Ellicott’s commentary on the Pastoral Epistles you will need a good grasp of Greek. Despite its age, this commentary still seems to be in demand, so I was very pleased to find one at Book Aid recently. This title is in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], The Pastoral Epistles of St. Paul: With a critical and Grammatical commentary and a revised translation, 3rd edn. London: Longmans, Green Reader & Dyer, 1869. Hbk. pp.263. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the Third Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on 1 Timothy
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on 2 Timothy
  • Introduction
  • Commentary on Titus
  • Translation: The First Epistle to Timothy
  • Translation: The Second Epistle to Timothy
  • Translation: The Epistle to Titus

Introduction

The date and general circumstances under which this and the accompanying Epistles were written have long been the subjects of discussion and controversy.

As our opinion on these points must first be stated, it may be said briefly,-(a) that when we duly consider that close connexion in thought, subject, expressions, and style, which exists between the First Epistle to Timothy and the other two Pastoral Epistles, it seems in the highest degree incredible that they could have been composed at intervals of time widely separated from each other. When we further consider (b) the almost insuperable difficulty in assigning any period for the composition of this group of Epistles in that portion of the Apostle’s life and labours included in the Acts; (c) the equally great or even greater difficulty in harmonizing the notes of time and place in these Epistles with those specified in the Apostle’s journeys as recorded by St Luke…

Alfred Plummer on the Pastoral Epistles

The Pastoral Epistles by Alfred PlummerThe commentary on the Pastoral Epistles by Alfred Plummer in the Expositor’s Bible Series is now available for free download in PDF.

Table of Contents

Introductory

Chapter I – The Character and the Genuineness of the Pastoral Epistles

I Timothy

Chapter II – Timothy the Beloved Disciple of S. Paul – His Life and Character

Chapter III – The Doctrine Condemned in the Pastoral Epistles A Jewish Form of Gnosticism – The Gnostic’s Problem

Chapter IV – The Moral Teaching of the Gnostics.-Its Modern Counterpart

Chapter V – The Lord’s Compassion in Enabling a Blasphemer and a Persecutor to Become a Servant of Christ Jesus and a Preacher of the Gospel

Chapter VI – The Prophecies on Timothy. – The Prophets of the New Testament an Exceptional Instrument of Edification

Chapter VII – The Punishment of Hymenaeus and Alexander – Delivering to Satan an Exceptional Instrument of Purification – The Personality of Satan

Chapter VIII – Elements of Christian Worship: Intercessory Prayer and Thanksgiving – The Solidarity of Christendom and of the Human Race

Chapter IX – Behaviour in Christian Worship: Men’s Attitude of Body and Mind: Women’s Attire and Ornament

Chapter X – The Origin of the Christian Ministry: Various Certainties and Probabilities Distinguished

Chapter XI – The Apostle’s Rule Respecting Second Marriages: Its Meaning and Present Obligation

Chapter. XII – The Relation of Human Conduct to the Mystery of Godliness

Chapter XIII – The Comparative Value of Bodily Exercise and of Godliness

Chapter XIV – The Pastor’s Behaviour Towards Women – The Church Widow

Chapter XV – The Pastor’s Responsibilities in Ordaining and Judging Presbyters – The Works that Go Before and that Follow Us

Chapter XVI – The Nature of Roman Slavery and the Apostle’s Attitude Towards It – A Modern Parallel

Chapter XVII – The Gain of a Love of Godliness and the Ungodliness of a Love of Gain

Titus

Chapter XVIII – The Epistle to Titus – His Life and Character

Chapter XIX – The Church in Crete and its Organization – The Apostle’s Directions for Appointing Elders

Chapter XX – Christianity and Unchristian Literature

Chapter XXI – The Meaning and Value of Sobermindedness – The Use and Abuse of Religious Emotion

Chapter XXII – The Moral Condition of Slaves – Their Adornment of the Doctrine of God

Chapter XXIII – Hope as a Motive Power – The Present Hopes of Christians

Chapter XXIV – The Duty of Obedience to Authority with its Limits. – The Duty of Courtesy Without Limits

Chapter XXV – The Co-Operation of the Divine Persons in Effecting the New Birth – The Laver of Regeneration

Chapter XXVI – The Meaning of Heresy in the New Testament and the Apostle’s Directions Respecting Heretical Persons

2 Timothy

Chapter XXVII – The Character and Contents of the Last Epistle of S. Paul – The Nemesis of Neglected Gifts

Chapter XXVIII – The Heartlessness of Phygelus and Hermogenes – The Devotion of Onesiphorus – Prayers for the Dead

Chapter XXIX – The Need of Machinery for the Preservation and Transmission of the Faith – The Machinery of the Primitive Church

Chapter XXX – The Christian’s Life as Military Service; as an Athletic Contest; as Husbandry

Chapter XXXI – The Power of a Belief in the Resurrection and the Incarnation – The Gospel of S. Paul

Chapter XXXII – The Need of a Solemn Charge Against a Controversial Spirit, of a Diligence Free From Shame, and of a Hatred of the Profanity which Wraps Up Error in the Language of Truth

Chapter XXXIII – The Last Days – The Bearing of the Mention of Jannes and Jambres on the Question of Inspiration and the Errors Current in Ephesus

Chapter XXXIV – The Perils of Rationalism and the Responsibilities of a Lifelong Contact with Truth – The Properties of Inspired Writings

Chapter XXXV – The Paradoxical Exultation of the Apostle – His Apparent Failure and the Apparent Failure of the Church – The Great Test of Sincerity

Chapter XXXVI – The Personal Details a Guarantee of Genuineness

Chapter XXXVII – The Apostle Forsaken by Men but Strengthened by the Lord – The Mission to the Gentiles Completed – The Sure Hope, and the Final Hymn of Praise