Greek Text Commentary on 1 & 2 Thessalsonians by George Milligan

If you have a good grasp of New Testament Greek, George Milligan’s commentary on Paul’s letters to the Thessalonians will be of interest to you.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

George Milligan [1860-1934], St Pauls Epistles to the Thessalonians. The Greek text with Introduction and Notes. London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., 1908. pp.195. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

  • The City of Thessalonica
  • St. Paul and the Thessalonian Church
  • General Character and Contents of the Epistles
  • Langauge, Style, and Literary Affinities
  • Doctrine
  • Authenticity and Integrity
  • Authorities for the Text
  • Commentaries

Text and Notes

Analysis of 1 Thessalonians

  • Text and Notes of 1 Thessalonians
  • Analysis of 2 Thessalonians
  • Text and Notes of 2 Thessalonians

Additional Notes

  • St. Paul as a Letter-Writer
  • Did St Paul use the Epistolary Plural?
  • The Thessalonian Friends of St Paul
  • The Divine Names in the Epistles
  • On the history of euangelion, euangelizomai
  • Parousia. Epithaneia. Apokaluphis
  • On atakteo and its cognates
  • On the meanings of katexo
  • The Biblical Doctrine of Antischrist
  • The history of the interpretation of 2 Thess. ii. 1-12

Indexes

Subjects

Authors

References

  1. Inscriptions and Papyri
    (a) Inscriptions
    (b) Papyri
  2. Judaistic Writings

Greek Words

Preface

The Epistles to the Thessalonians can hardly be said to have received at the hands of English scholars the attention they deserve, in view not only of their own intrinsic interest, but of the place which they occupy in the Sacred Canon. They are generally believed to be the earliest of St Paul’s extant Epistles, and, if so, are, in all probability, the oldest Christian documents of importance that have come down to us. Certainly no other of the Pauline writings give us a clearer idea of the character of the Apostle’s missionary preaching, or present a more living picture of the surroundings of the primitive Christian Church. A detailed study of their contents is essential, therefore, to· a proper understanding of the Apostolic Age, and forms the best introduction to the more developed interpretation of Christian thought, which we are accustomed to describe as Paulinism.

p.vii.

J.B. Lightfoot’s Unfinished Commentaries on Paul’s Letters

Joseph Barber Lightfoot
Joseph Barber Lightfoot

Bishop J.B. Lightfoot died before completing his commentaries on Romans, 1 Corinthians, Ephesians and 1 & 2 Thessalonians. His notes on these books were gathered together and published in this volume. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Joseph Barber Lightfoot [1828-1889], Notes on the Epistles of Paul from Unpublished Commentaries. London & New York: MacMillan & Co., 1895. Hbk. pp.336. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Introductory Note
  1. The First Epistle to the Thessalonians
  2. The Second Epistle to the Thessalonians
  3. The First Epistle to the Corinthians
  4. The Epistle to the Romans
  5. The Epistle to the Ephesians
  • Indices

Introductory Note

The present work represents the fulfilment of the undertaking announced in the preface to ‘Biblical Essays’ a year and a half ago. As that volume consisted of introductory essays upon New Testament subjects, so this comprises such of Dr Lightfoot’s notes on the text as in the opinion of the Trustees of the Lightfoot Fund are sufficiently complete to justify publication. However, unlike ‘Biblical Essays,’ of which a considerable part had already been given to the world, this volume, as its title-page indicates, consists entirely of unpublished matter. It aims at reproducing, wherever possible, the courses of lectures delivered at Cambridge by Dr Lightfoot upon those Pauline Epistles which he did not live to edit in the form of complete commentaries. His method of trusting to his memory in framing sentences in the lecture room has been alluded to already in the preface to the previous volume…

page v.

Charles J. Ellicott’s Commentary on the Letters to the Thessalonians

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905]
Portrait of Bishop Charles Ellicott By Herbert R. Barraud (died 1896) – Public Domain. Source: Wikipedia
This is a detailed commentary on the Greek text of Paul’s Letters to the Thessalonians by Biship Charles Ellicott. As such those with a good knowledge of Greek will benefit most from it. This title is in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], St. Paul’s Epistles to the Thessalonians: With a critical and Grammatical commentary and a revised translation, 4th edn. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts & Green, 1880. Hbk. pp.167. [Click here to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the Third Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • 1 Thessalonians
  • 2 Thessalonians

Introduction

This calm, practical, and profoundly consolatory Epistle was written by the Apostle to his converts in the wealthy and populous city of Thessalonica not long after his first visit to Macedonia ( Acts xvi. 9), when in conjunction with Silas and Timothy he laid the foundations of the Thessalonian Church (Acts xvii. 1 sq.). See notes on ch. i. 1.

The exact time of writing the Epistle appears to have been the early months of the Apostle’s year and a half stay at Corinth (Acts xviii. 11), soon after Timothy had joined him (1 Thess. iii. 6) and reported the spiritual state of their converts, into which he had been sent to enquire (eh. iii. 2), probably from Athens; see notes on eh. iii. 1. We may thus consider the close of A.D. 52, or the beginning of A.D. 53, as the probable date, and, if this be correct, must place the Epistle first on the chronological list of the Apostle’s writings….