Charles Ellicott’s Commentary on Ephesians on-line

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905]
Charles J. Ellicott By Herbert R. Barraud (died 1896), Public Domain. Source: Wikipedia Commons,
Charles J. Ellicott [1819-1905] was during his distinguished career Professor of Divinity at King’s College London, Hulsean Professor of Divinity at Cambridge University and Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol [See Wikipedia article]. Ellicott wrote several detailed commentaries on the Greek Text of several New Testament books. Readers with good NT Greek will benefit most from this book. This title is in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], St. Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians: With a critical and grammatical commentary, and a revised translation, 4th revised edn. London: Longmans, Green Reader & Dyer, 1868. Hbk. pp.190. [Click to visit the main download page]

Table of Contents

  • Advertisement to the Fourth Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Introduction
  • Commentary
  • Translation

Preface to First Edition

The following pages form the second part of a Commentary on St Paul’s Epistles, founded on the same principles and constructed on the same plan as that on the Epistle to the Galatians.

As I explained somewhat at length in the preface to that Epistle the general principles, critical, grammatical, and exegetical, upon which this Commentary has been attempted, I will now only make a few special observations on this present portion of the work, and record my obligations to those expositors who have more particularly devoted themselves to this Epistle.

With regard to the present Commentary, I must remind the reader, that as in style, matter, and logical connexion, this sublime Epistle differs considerably from that to the Galatians, so the Commentary must necessarily in many respects reflect these differences and distinctions. Several points of grammatical interest which particularly characterized the former Epistle are scarcely perceptible in the present…

For more resources on the Book of Ephesians visit this page.

Wayne Grudem on “Does kephale (“Head”) Mean “Source” Or “Authority Over” in Greek Literature? A Survey of 2,336 Examples”

The following article is now on-line in PDF:

Wayne Grudem, “Does Kephale (“Head”) Mean “Source” or “Authority Over” in Greek Literature? A Survey of 2,336 Examples,” Trinity Journal ns 6.1 (Spring 1985): 38-59.

This is an important article for those interested in the role relationships of men and women because it fatally undermines the oft-repeated and unfounded argument that kephale means ‘source’ and not ‘head’ in the NT. Grudem’s later article on this subject is also available on-line:

Wayne Grudem, “The Meaning Of kephale (‘Head’: ‘An Evaluation Of New Evidence, Real And Alleged,” Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 44.1 (2001): 25-65.

I have recently added another article that addresses the issue from a complimentarian position that is worth a read:

The New Testament Teaching on the Ministry of Women (P.G. Nelson)