Commentary on Revelation by William Henry Simcox

The Reverend William Henry Simcox was the Rector of Harlaxton in Lincolnshire. This is his contribution to the Cambridge Bible for Schools series on the Book of Revelation.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

William Henry Simcox [1843-1889], The Revelation of S. John the Divine with Notes and Introduction, 2nd edn. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1910. Hbk. pp.176. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Text and Notes
  3. Appendices

Introduction: Authorship and Canonicity

In the case of some of the books of Scripture, the questions of their authorship and of their canonical authority are quite independent of one another. Many books are anonymous, many have their authors known only by a post-canonical tradition; and the rejection, in any case where it may be called for, of this tradition need not and ought not to involve a denial of the divine authority of the book. Even in cases where the supposed author is named or unmistakeably indicated in the book itself, it does not always follow that the book must either be written by him, or can owe none of its inspiration to the Spirit of truth: the person of the professed author may be assumed dramatically without any mala fides. On the other hand, there are books which plainly exclude any such hypothesis, and must either be forgeries, more or less excusable but hardly consistent with divine direction, or else must be accepted as genuine and inspired works of their professed authors.

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