Notes on the Hebrew Text of the Book of Kings by C.F. Burney

Solomon greeting the Queen of Sheba – gate of Florence Baptistry. Source: Wikipedia

Rev. Charles Fox Burney [1868–1925] was a lecturer in Hebrew at the University of Oxford, becoming Oriel Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture in 1914. This work is effectively a commentary on the Hebrew text of the Books of 1 & 2 Kings.

I had thought, once again, that I would save time by using an on-line text, but on closer examination the one I had chosen had missing and blurred pages and took extra work to correct.

Charles Fox Burney [1868-1925], Notes on the Hebrew Text of the Book of Kings with an Introduction and Notes. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1903. Hbk. pp.384. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Introduction

  1. Structure of Kings
  2. Characteristics of the Chief Ancient Versions of Kings
  3. The Synchrinisms of the Compiler

List of Abbreviations

Notes on 1 Kings

Notes on 2 Kings

Appendix:

  1. Inscription of Mesha’, King of Moab
  2. The Siloam Inscription
  3. Inscription of the Monolith of Shalmanezer II, II. 78-102
  4. Fragment of the Annals of Shalmeneser II. Descriptive Inscription from the Obleish of Shalmanser
  5. Narrative of Sennacherib’s Third Campaign (B.C. 701) from the Taylor Cylinder, Col. II. I. 34-Col. III.I.41

Additions

Index

Introduction: The Structure of Kings

The fact that Kings, like the other historical books of the Old Testament, is based upon pre-existing written sources is universally recognized; and the evidence upon which this elementary proposition is based need not here be set forth. That the main editor or compiler of these sources was a Deuteronomist, i.e. that his work was inspired by the religious revival which took place in the eighteenth year of Josiah (B.C. 621) under the influence of the newly discovered book of Deuteronomy, appears both from his religious standpoint and from his phraseology. This editor is therefore hereinafter cited under the symbol RD (Deuteronomic Redactor).

To RD is due the stereotyped form into which the introduction and conclusion of a reign is thrown, and which constitutes, as it were, the framework upon which the narrative as a whole is built. The regularity of the method of RO in the construction of this framework is worthy of special notice.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: