Greek Text Commentary on 1 & 2 Thessalsonians by George Milligan

Greek Text Commentary on 1 & 2 Thessalsonians by George Milligan 1

If you have a good grasp of New Testament Greek, George Milligan’s commentary on Paul’s letters to the Thessalonians will be of interest to you.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

George Milligan [1860-1934], St Pauls Epistles to the Thessalonians. The Greek text with Introduction and Notes. London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., 1908. pp.195. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

  • The City of Thessalonica
  • St. Paul and the Thessalonian Church
  • General Character and Contents of the Epistles
  • Langauge, Style, and Literary Affinities
  • Doctrine
  • Authenticity and Integrity
  • Authorities for the Text
  • Commentaries

Text and Notes

Analysis of 1 Thessalonians

  • Text and Notes of 1 Thessalonians
  • Analysis of 2 Thessalonians
  • Text and Notes of 2 Thessalonians

Additional Notes

  • St. Paul as a Letter-Writer
  • Did St Paul use the Epistolary Plural?
  • The Thessalonian Friends of St Paul
  • The Divine Names in the Epistles
  • On the history of euangelion, euangelizomai
  • Parousia. Epithaneia. Apokaluphis
  • On atakteo and its cognates
  • On the meanings of katexo
  • The Biblical Doctrine of Antischrist
  • The history of the interpretation of 2 Thess. ii. 1-12

Indexes

Subjects

Authors

References

  1. Inscriptions and Papyri
    (a) Inscriptions
    (b) Papyri
  2. Judaistic Writings

Greek Words

Preface

The Epistles to the Thessalonians can hardly be said to have received at the hands of English scholars the attention they deserve, in view not only of their own intrinsic interest, but of the place which they occupy in the Sacred Canon. They are generally believed to be the earliest of St Paul’s extant Epistles, and, if so, are, in all probability, the oldest Christian documents of importance that have come down to us. Certainly no other of the Pauline writings give us a clearer idea of the character of the Apostle’s missionary preaching, or present a more living picture of the surroundings of the primitive Christian Church. A detailed study of their contents is essential, therefore, to· a proper understanding of the Apostolic Age, and forms the best introduction to the more developed interpretation of Christian thought, which we are accustomed to describe as Paulinism.

p.vii.

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