Commentary on the Gospel of Luke by F.W. Farrar

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Gospel According to Luke with Maps, Notes and IntroductionThis is another of the Cambridge Bible for Schools series, a commentary on the Gospel of Luke by F.W. Farrar. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Gospel According to Luke with Maps, Notes and Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1888. Hbk. pp.392. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

I. Introduction

  1. The Gospels
  2. Life of St John
  3. Authenticity of the Gospel
  4. Characteristics of the Gospel
  5. Analysis of the Gospel; Chief Uncial MSS. of the Gospels; The Herods

II. Text and Notes

III. Excursus I-VII

IV. Index

Introduction, Chapter 1

The word Gospel is the Saxon translation of the Greek Euangelion. In early Greek (e.g. in Homer) this word meant the reward given to one who brought good tidings. In Attic Greek it also meant a sacrifice for good tidings but was always used in the plural euangelia. In later Greek, as in Plutarch and Lucian, euangeli’on meant the good news actually delivered. Among all Greek-speaking Christians the word was naturally adopted to describe the best and gladdest tidings ever delivered to the human race, the good news of the Kingdom of God. In the address of the Angel to the shepherds we find the words “I bring you good tidings of great joy,” where the verb used is euangelizomai. From this Greek word are derived the French Evangile, the Italian Evangelio, the Portuguese Evangelio, &c. Naturally the word which signified “good news” soon came to be used as the title of the books which contained the history of that good news….

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: